Paradigms for Liturgy


#1

As I understand it, the idea of “Mass as Paschal Mystery” paradigm was always present in the Roman Rite, but it was not emphasized until after Vatican II and is, of course, most especially present (at least theoretically) in OF celebrations. This paradigm is very appropriate and traditional in the Eastern Rites, I believe.

My question is, what was/is the paradigm of the Mass/liturgy according to Roman books published before Vatican II?

Furthermore, do you think it is legitimate to apply any other liturgical paradigms to the OF?


#2

The expression of the whole Paschal Mystery - Christ’s Passion, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension - is fundamental in all Catholic liturgy.

I disagree with statement that the Paschal Mystery was not emphasized until after Vatican II. Actually, IMHO the reverse is true even if the term may not have been specifically employed previously.

God Bless.

mda


#3

But doesn’t an overemphasis of that make the notion of different Masses–Christmas, All Souls, Epiphany, Sts. Peter and Paul, etc.–pointless?


#4

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:1, topic:306493"]
As I understand it, the idea of "Mass as Paschal Mystery" paradigm was always present in the Roman Rite, but it was not emphasized until after Vatican II and is, of course, most especially present (at least theoretically) in OF celebrations. This paradigm is very appropriate and traditional in the Eastern Rites, I believe.

My question is, what was/is the paradigm of the Mass/liturgy according to Roman books published before Vatican II?

Furthermore, do you think it is legitimate to apply any other liturgical paradigms to the OF?

[/quote]

Baltimore Catechism 1891:

Q. 405. On what day did Christ rise from the dead?
A. Christ rose from the dead, glorious and immortal, on Easter Sunday, the third day after His death.

Q. 406. Why is the Resurrection the greatest of Christ's miracles?
A. The Resurrection is the greatest of Christ's miracles because all He taught and did is confirmed by it and depends upon it. He promised to rise from the dead and without the fulfillment of that promise we could not believe in Him.

Q. 417. Why is the paschal candle which is lighted on Easter morning extinguished at the Mass on Ascension Day?
A. The paschal candle which is lighted on Easter morning signifies Christ's visible presence on earth, and it is extinguished on Ascension Day to show that He, having fulfilled all the prophecies concerning Himself and having accomplished the work of redemption, has transferred the visible care of His Church to His Apostles and returned in His body to heaven.

Q. 807. What is Lent?
A. Lent is the forty days before Easter Sunday, during which we do penance, fast and pray to prepare ourselves for the resurrection of Our Lord; and also to remind us of His own fast of forty days before His Passion.

Q. 895. Why did Christ institute the Holy Eucharist?
A. Christ instituted the Holy Eucharist:[INDENT] 1. To unite us to Himself and to nourish our soul with His divine life.
2. To increase sanctifying grace and all virtues in our soul.
3. To lessen our evil inclinations.
4. To be a pledge of everlasting life.
5. To fit our bodies for a glorious resurrection.
6. To continue the sacrifice of the Cross in His Church.
[/INDENT]Q. 917. What is the Mass?
A. The Mass is the unbloody sacrifice of the body and blood of Christ.

Q. 918. Why is this Sacrifice called the Mass?
A. This Sacrifice is called the "Mass" very probably from the words "Ite Missa est," used by the priest as he tells the people to depart when the Holy Sacrifice is ended.

Q. 919. What is a sacrifice?
A. A sacrifice is the offering of an object by a priest to God alone, and the consuming of it to acknowledge that He is the Creator and Lord of all things.

Q. 920. Is the Mass the same sacrifice as that of the Cross?
A. The Mass is the same sacrifice as that of the Cross.

Q. 921. How is the Mass the same sacrifice as that of the Cross?
A. The Mass is the same sacrifice as that of the Cross because the offering and the priest are the same -- Christ our Blessed Lord; and the ends for which the sacrifice of the Mass is offered are the same as those of the sacrifice of the Cross.

Q. 922. What were the ends for which the sacrifice of the Cross was offered?
A. The ends for which the sacrifice of the Cross was offered were: 1. To honor and glorify God;
2. To thank Him for all the graces bestowed on the whole world;
3. To satisfy God's justice for the sins of men;
4. To obtain all graces and blessings.


#5

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