Parents 'have no due process or privacy right


#1

confirmthem.com/?p=1861#more-1861

“There is no fundamental right of parents to be the exclusive provider of information regarding sexual matters to their children.”
The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which has previously ruled that the Pledge of Allegiance is unconstitutional, has again thrust a dagger into the heart of the American way of life — and has this time attacked the very institution which has kept the foundation of this country secure — the family.

Fields v. Palmdale School Dist., — F.3d– (9th Cir. 2005), was decided today by the court. In that case, parents sued the Palmdale School District for giving a survey, which included ten questions of a sexual nature, to students between the ages of seven and ten.

The School District sent a note home to parents asking for parental consent to engage their children in a survey of early trauma. The survey was prepared by Kristi Seymour, a volunteer “mental health counselor” at Mesquite Elementary School while she was enrolled in a master’s degree program at the California School of Professional Psychology. The School District, collaborating with the School of Psychology and Seymour, developed and administered the questionnaire to first, third, and fifth grade students. While parents were informed that the survey would cover “baseline . . . exposure to early trauma (for example, violence),” it specifically did not mention sex. In fact, the survey asked seven year olds to “rate the following activities” among which were these:

  1. Touching my private parts too much

  2. Thinking about having sex

  3. Thinking about touching other people’s private parts

  4. Thinking about sex when I don’t want to

  5. Washing myself because I feel dirty on the inside

  6. Not trusting people because they might want sex

  7. Getting scared or upset when I think about sex

  8. Having sex feelings in my body

  9. Can’t stop thinking about sex

  10. Getting upset when people talk about sex


#2

[quote=swampfox]confirmthem.com/?p=1861#more-1861

“There is no fundamental right of parents to be the exclusive provider of information regarding sexual matters to their children.”

Interestingly, while the court ruled that parents have no “right to override the determinations of public schools as to the information to which children might be exposed,” the public schools, according to the Ninth Circuit, can only expose children to sex. Exposing children to prayer or the Pledge of Allegiance would indoctrinate the children unfairly.
[/quote]

:eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:


#3

I don’t wonder why I home school.


#4

Who would expect the 9th circuit to rule otherwise?

A better question is when are the people not going to tolerate renegade and immoral decisions by unelected judges?


#5

WorldNetDaily
Court: It does take a village
when it comes to sexuality
Parents ‘have no due process or privacy right
to override the determinations of public schools’

Posted: November 3, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern

© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled yesterday against parents who sued their local school district after their elementary-age children were given a sexually charged survey, saying there is “no fundamental right of parents to be the exclusive provider of information regarding sexual matters to their children.”

The three-judge panel of the full court further ruled that parents “have no due process or privacy right to override the determinations of public schools as to the information to which their children will be exposed while enrolled as students.”

Six parents sued the Palmdale, Calif., School District after finding out their kids had been asked a series of sexual questions in class. They included asking the children about the frequency of:

For More: worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47195

It makes me glad I chose to Home School! I hope some higher court gets this over ruled before it really gets out of hand!


#6

I thought most public schools ahd opt-out procedures specifically to avoid situations like this?!


#7

So much for the ancient social tenet that the parents are the first and primary educators of their children, period.
HELLO BIG BROTHER!


#8

What a skewed survey! If the first approach didn’t work out in the courts, then the parents need to find a different angle because those questions most certainly have the undertones of a pro-fornication attitude. In other words, it seems as if the questions are designed to find answers that will make it appear that the children need even more sex ed! “Professionals” will use those results to prove that childrennned a more objective and in-depth sex ed at school since the children’s survey replies show such deep emotional conflict for that group. Give me a break.

But more importantly, what a tragic violation of parental rights. That survey is garbage at best and is something that would create confusion and shame in most children. Those poor families. God bless them for their courageous stance on this matter. I hope their children are being educated elsewhere.


#9

[quote=kp1]It makes me glad I chose to Home School! I hope some higher court gets this over ruled before it really gets out of hand!
[/quote]

That is how you claim that right.

[quote=smartblkchick]I thought most public schools had opt-out procedures specifically to avoid situations like this?!
[/quote]

Yes, but they aren’t compelled by law to do so. This is a very good reason to be active in those bodies that do have a right to dictate these policies: school boards. Parent-teacher associations also have a great deal of leverage.

According to these rules, the parents of a single child have limited rights in overriding the consensus of the educators, administrators, and other parents at their school. This makes it clear how very important it is to be informed and active in these bodies.

BTW, those questions sound very much like they are aimed at identifying children who are being sexually molested, because they lean so hard on words like “too much” and other uncomfortable feelings toward the child’s own body. If this is the aim, perhaps it could be achieved in a way less likely to cause collateral damage.


#10

[quote=BLB_Oregon]BTW, those questions sound very much like they are aimed at identifying children who are being sexually molested, because they lean so hard on words like “too much” and other uncomfortable feelings toward the child’s own body. If this is the aim, perhaps it could be achieved in a way less likely to cause collateral damage.
[/quote]

The story I read said that parents had signed permission forms but that the forms did not metion that the survey would concern sex, also that the survey was for very young children. I agree with Oregon about the above statement. And I say this as someone who was sexually molested as a child. Having a survey such as this might have helped me admit and deal with the trauma at a much earlier age, which would have been a blessing. As it was I didn’t deal with it until I was a very confused, messed up adult. My abusers were the kids of a woman who ran a day care out of her home, but I know that in many cases it is the parents or other family member that is the guilty party -thus they would never consent to something that might bring their abuse to light. However, I realize that there is no easy answer to the problem and can sympathize with the feelings of the parents.


#11

Fortunately, or unfortuately, the Ninth is the most frequently overruled Appeals Court in the U.S.


#12

hilarious…and thank GOD the 9th Cir. Appellate is the joke of the system. Let’s see…the parent can sue in hopes of winning the right to determine whether or not the Pledge of Allegiance is said in the classroom because their child is being brought up as an athiest and saying ‘under God’ might make them uncomfortable…but parents as a group do not have the primary role in determining what sexual education is given to their child…:whacky:


#13

confirmthem.com/?p=1861#more-1861

“There is no fundamental right of parents to be the exclusive provider of information regarding sexual matters to their children.”
The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which has previously ruled that the Pledge of Allegiance is unconstitutional, has again thrust a dagger into the heart of the American way of life — and has this time attacked the very institution which has kept the foundation of this country secure — the family.

Fields v. Palmdale School Dist., — F.3d– (9th Cir. 2005), was decided today by the court. In that case, parents sued the Palmdale School District for giving a survey, which included ten questions of a sexual nature, to students between the ages of seven and ten.

The School District sent a note home to parents asking for parental consent to engage their children in a survey of early trauma. The survey was prepared by Kristi Seymour, a volunteer “mental health counselor” at Mesquite Elementary School while she was enrolled in a master’s degree program at the California School of Professional Psychology. The School District, collaborating with the School of Psychology and Seymour, developed and administered the questionnaire to first, third, and fifth grade students. While parents were informed that the survey would cover “baseline . . . exposure to early trauma (for example, violence),” it specifically did not mention sex. In fact, the survey asked seven year olds to “rate the following activities” among which were these:

  1. Touching my private parts too much

  2. Thinking about having sex

  3. Thinking about touching other people’s private parts

  4. Thinking about sex when I don’t want to

  5. Washing myself because I feel dirty on the inside

  6. Not trusting people because they might want sex

  7. Getting scared or upset when I think about sex

  8. Having sex feelings in my body

  9. Can’t stop thinking about sex

  10. Getting upset when people talk about sex


#14

Interesting. I have a Master’s in Counseling and a survey like this would have never been approved by my supervisor. Just because something is legal doesn’t make it morally correct. I would say the union probably had it’s lawyers all over this to set an example because it could have opened all sorts of other lawsuits to the school district.


#15

[quote=Cupofkindness]But more importantly, what a tragic violation of parental rights. That survey is garbage at best and is something that would create confusion and shame in most children.
[/quote]

Beyond parental rights, what about the poor children being asked such personal, private questions by authority figures in their school? Would a child given that survey have enough courage to tell teachers that that those questions are none of their business? Or would refusing to answer such garbage get a child sent to the principal’s office for being non-cooperative? Even if the parents don’t object to these questions being asked, I feel sorry for the children asked those types of questions.

If this is how they educate children about sexuality, I wonder what “survey” questions they ask to educate children about math and grammar.


#16

[quote=swampfox]--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

confirmthem.com/?p=1861#more-1861

“There is no fundamental right of parents to be the exclusive provider of information regarding sexual matters to their children.”
The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which has previously ruled that the Pledge of Allegiance is unconstitutional, has again thrust a dagger into the heart of the American way of life — and has this time attacked the very institution which has kept the foundation of this country secure — the family.

Fields v. Palmdale School Dist., — F.3d– (9th Cir. 2005), was decided today by the court. In that case, parents sued the Palmdale School District for giving a survey, which included ten questions of a sexual nature, to students between the ages of seven and ten.

The School District sent a note home to parents asking for parental consent to engage their children in a survey of early trauma. The survey was prepared by Kristi Seymour, a volunteer “mental health counselor” at Mesquite Elementary School while she was enrolled in a master’s degree program at the California School of Professional Psychology. The School District, collaborating with the School of Psychology and Seymour, developed and administered the questionnaire to first, third, and fifth grade students. While parents were informed that the survey would cover “baseline . . . exposure to early trauma (for example, violence),” it specifically did not mention sex. In fact, the survey asked seven year olds to “rate the following activities” among which were these:

  1. Touching my private parts too much

  2. Thinking about having sex

  3. Thinking about touching other people’s private parts

  4. Thinking about sex when I don’t want to

  5. Washing myself because I feel dirty on the inside

  6. Not trusting people because they might want sex

  7. Getting scared or upset when I think about sex

  8. Having sex feelings in my body

  9. Can’t stop thinking about sex

  10. Getting upset when people talk about sex
    [/quote]

If a child does not have knowledge about sex-and most kids of seven don’t-then how could they answer some of these questions? My daughter would be be confused by most of these questions.


#17

I have a seven year old daughter, who I have not yet talked about sex with. I can’t imagine what she would think about such questions. I can only guess that she would be highly confused.:frowning:


#18

[quote=smartblkchick]I thought most public schools ahd opt-out procedures specifically to avoid situations like this?!
[/quote]

Not necessarily. See this thread: forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=78557

Many states no longer offer that option.


#19

I’m sorry but what is the “true” purpose in something like this? I honestly don’t see a real point to this. If they want a survey on trauma with children exposed already to violence and sexual abuse, talk to these children, they need the help. You would get your answers there. I think a survey with such content would do more damage than any “help” that might come of it.


#20

This is being discussed on Rush’s show right now. I’m surprised it took so long.


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