Parents turn down $100M settlement


#1

Since Erika Langhart died at age 24 after two heart attacks in 2011, her parents Karen and Rick Langhart have fought to have the product that they say killed her – NuvaRing – taken off the market.

Now they are denouncing the $100 million settlement that Merck & Co., the pharmaceutical giant that produces NuvaRing, is offering to resolve about 3,800 lawsuits in federal and state courts, claiming the company concealed NuvaRing’s potentially lethal side effects.

Numerous studies show NuvaRing, a form of birth control that uses “desogestrel,” a third-generation progestin, increases the risk of blood clots that lead to strokes and heart attacks.


#2

These sorts of lawsuits are ridiculous IMO. NuvaRing has always included a warning about the risk of blood clots so is it that unreasonable to expect people to read the warning labels on the packaging before they insert a foreign object into their bodies?


#3

I can understand them turning down the 100 million…their daughter life is priceless to them and money wont replace her or bring her back.

And i have to admire them for trying to prevent the same thing happening to someone elses daughter.

May their daughter rest in peace


#4

Pity all the way around, yet even fellow “Christians” still praise the worth of contraception.


#5

Which is why I will not carry/dispense it (or OC’s, either).


#6

This reminds me of a (perhaps apocryphal) story about the early days of the pill. In the 50’s, drug companies were researching pills that could suppress female fertility but ALSO were looking into pills that would temporarily render men infertile.

As the story goes, a male pill made it to clinical trials at nearly the same time as the women’s pill. In the men’s group, a several men experienced side effects ranging from longer term infertility to impotence. All testing was immediately ceased and the research abandoned.

The first clinical trials of the WOMEN’s pill included several DEATHS and severe blood clot events. The researchers promptly reduced the dosage slightly and went to market!

Wish I knew if the story were true. If so, it quite uncovers the lie that the pill was created to liberate women.


#7

Whoah!!!
I’m gonna check this. Do you remember if you read it somewhere or if someone told you about it??

.


#8

Its a bit of an urban legend. The first clinical trial took place in Boston and there were no deaths or reports of blood clots. The second took place in Puerto Rico and while two women (out of hundreds) who were participating in the clinical trial died; their cause of death was never determined so no one knows if it was just coincidence or really was related to the clinical trial. Dosages were actually reduced in response to reported side effects such as dizziness, nausea, and vomitting. Blood clots were never reported as a side effect in those days nor would they have been based on their understanding, or lack thereof, of such things even as late as the 1950s - early 1960s. Back then, doctors and researchers thought they were just symptoms of a hereditary blood disorder and had no idea it could be worsened by external factors.


#9

It’s not an urban legend. In Puerto Rico, three women died while participating in the clinical trials and no investigation was conducted to determine the cause of death. This alone should be alarming. In the United States, any side effect reported by any clinical trial participant is recorded as potentially being caused by the drug or procedure being studied. If a clinical trial participant is hit by a bus walking home from the hospital, it’s counted as a potential side effect. Dr. Edris Rice-Wray was the faculty member at Puerto Rico Medical School in charge of running the clinical trials on the oral contraceptive and advised American scientists John Rock and Gregory Pincus that although the pill was very effective at preventing pregnancies (100% in that original trial), he considered it to have too many side effects to be acceptable for women.

I think the reason this is considered relevent is because when original clinical trials for the male contraceptive pill resulted in slight testicle shrinkage, the trials were stopped. It’s a double standard and speaks to a true disregard for women’s health. In other words, what does it say about our respect for the two sexes when we tolerate death as a (however remote) potential side effect for women but think it unacceptable to risk shrinkage of a male body part? And all in the name of being able to have sex without consequences…


#10

I’ve heard a similar story, except that the side effect in men was testicular shrinkage.

I seem to know a lot of women who took birth control back in the 70’s who subsequently had to have hysterectomies.


#11

vanityfair.com/politics/2014/01/nuvaring-lethal-contraceptive-trial

Also here on Lifesite:

lifesitenews.com/blog/vanity-fair-busts-planned-parenthood-in-undercover-nuvaring-sting

If you go to Page 3 on the Vanity Fair link you will see where they sent people in to Planned Parenthood to see what they say about NuvaRing.


#12

Check out this story from Vanity Fair about Nuvaring which has been publicised by a number of people:

vanityfair.com/politics/2014/01/nuvaring-lethal-contraceptive-trial


#13

:thumbsup:


#14

Testicular shrinkage in an unapproved drug or not, this woman should have known the risks of the drug she was taking, but ignored them.

Sounds like she is like so many others that take medications without learning the risks. :shrug:


#15

But, how many people question a doctor regarding the risks of taking a drug? They trust the doc knows what they are doing. (Silly, I know.) And even if you question a doctor, they will ignore your concerns. (I have had that happen a number of times with different docs & different drugs.)


#16

Warning labels do a VERY poor job of communicating actual risks. Just take a look at your next bottle of Tylenol or Advil if you doubt me. They also disclose risk factors and tiny print enough to turn you blind. Expecting the average consumer to know 15 lines of fine print denoting serious risks from 15 lines of tiny print covering lawyer CYA copy isn’t realistic and is a real shortcoming of the FDA system. In my opinion, of course.


#17

Maybe it made sense to blindly trust everything your doctor said, 40 years ago.

Forty years ago they knew you.

Nowadays, they spend 10 minutes, if you are lucky, with you and are out of the door before they learn your name. So, yes, you have to be your own advocate.


#18

It is lot easier to understand than that. This family was not offered $100,000,000 for themselves. That amount was to settle more than 3800 suits and that would be about $26,000 less attorney fees if everyone received an equal amount. Not all the suits involved deaths, but illnesses and disabilities can be more expensive than a death in legal calculations.

The total amount sounds like a lot of money which is exactly why the defendant would announce it this way. It is a mere pittance compared to the harm done, but then you also have to consider that there was a warning label and the patient should have no expectation the the risk is non-existent.

Catholics are fortunate to know that the risk of using contraception is greater than anything that can kill the body, if only they listen to the authentic magisterium rather than the current culture.


#19

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