Passion Sunday


#1

The fifth Sunday in Lent has traditionaly been called Passion Sunday, recently Palm Sunday has claimed this Title, me being more traditional, I still call the fifth Sunday in Lent Passion Sunday. Anyways, here’s the question for the pull. On the fifth Sunday in Lent, does your church cover the statues and crucifixes with a purple shroud? Mine covers the crucifixes, but not the statues.


#2

No, in my church all was uncovered. And to be perfectly honest, I did not know of this tradition. I’m a fallen away (European) Catholic (now living in the USA over 30 years) who came back to the Faith in 1999.


#3

[quote=MvGeel]No, in my church all was uncovered. And to be perfectly honest, I did not know of this tradition. I’m a fallen away (European) Catholic (now living in the USA over 30 years) who came back to the Faith in 1999.
[/quote]

Today, we enter what is called Passion Tide, the church begins to focus on the Lord’s Passion, which is why this Sunday has traditionally been called Passion Sunday. Here is the old Gospel reading for this Sunday:

"At that time, Jesus said to the crowd of the Jews: Which of you shall convince me of sin? If I say the truth to you, why do you not believe me? He that is of God, heareth the words of God. Therefore you hear them not, because you are not of God. The Jews therefore answered, and said to him: Do not we say well that thou art a Samaritan, and hast a devil? Jesus answered: I have not a devil: but I honour my Father, and you have dishonoured me. But I seek not my own glory: there is one that seeketh and judgeth.

Amen, amen I say to you: If any man keep my word, he shall not see death for ever. The Jews therefore said: Now we know that thou hast a devil. Abraham is dead, and the prophets; and thou sayest: If any man keep my word, he shall not taste death for ever. Art thou greater than our father Abraham, who is dead? and the prophets are dead. Whom dost thou make thyself? Jesus answered: If I glorify myself, my glory is nothing. It is my Father that glorifieth me, of whom you say that he is your God. And you have not known him, but I know him. And if I shall say that I know him not, I shall be like to you, a liar. But I do know him, and do keep his word.

Abraham your father rejoiced that he might see my day: he saw it, and was glad. The Jews therefore said to him: Thou art not yet fifty years old, and hast thou seen Abraham? Jesus said to them: Amen, amen I say to you, before Abraham was made, I am. They took up stones therefore to cast at him. But Jesus hid himself, and went out of the temple." (John 8:46-59)

The tradition of covering the statues and crucifixes comes from when wakes were held in the house of the deceased. The family members of the deceased would cover all the pictures of the deceased and anything that reminded them of the deceased to show that they are mourning over the lose of the deceased. This tradition was carried into the church. Durring passion tide the statues and crucifixes (reminders of Jesus) were covered with a purple shroud, being the color of penance, as a sign of mourning over his passion. Everything would be covered from Passion Sunday until Easter Sunday.


#4

All statues and the processional crucifix. The main crucifix hangs from rafters above the altar and cannot be covered without use a ladder and a large deal of cloth, so it is left uncovered.


#5

All crucifixes and statues that may easily be covered are. As RomanRiteTeen pointed out, it is not always practical to cover them all. They are kept covered until Easter Sunday, always in purple (to mark the Passion).

“Passion” Sunday has always been called Palm Sunday at my parish (but I am young so don’t know that it always has been) because of the palms. The Passion is read and everyone stands throughout (although those who cannot due to health reasons may sit). IMO it is one of the most beautiful and reverant services in the year.


#6

Only the crucifix on the old high altar was covered in our church this morning.


#7

Everything was covered in our church. The parish I used to belong to didn’t do this. It really enforced to me what it really is all about.


#8

[quote=teresas1979]All crucifixes and statues that may easily be covered are. As RomanRiteTeen pointed out, it is not always practical to cover them all. They are kept covered until Easter Sunday, always in purple (to mark the Passion).

“Passion” Sunday has always been called Palm Sunday at my parish (but I am young so don’t know that it always has been) because of the palms. The Passion is read and everyone stands throughout (although those who cannot due to health reasons may sit). IMO it is one of the most beautiful and reverant services in the year.
[/quote]

The Fifth Sunday in Lent has traditionally been called Passion Sunday, it was after Vatican II that the title was transfered to Palm Sunday, making that Sunday’s full title “Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion.” Before Vatican II, Palm Sunday was called just that. That title was transferred because like you said, the Passion was read on Palm Sunday. Also, the old Gospel reading for the Fifth Sunday in Lent; which alludes to Christ’s Passion, is no longer read in any of the Liturgical lectionary cycles for that Sunday. I don’t know why, but I’m sure there was a reason.


#9

[quote=teresas1979]IMO it is one of the most beautiful and reverant services in the year.
[/quote]

I agree! :thumbsup:


#10

My parish covers all the statues and crucifix, even though we only have the Tridentine Mass on the 3rd Sunday of the month at the 10:00 Mass.

I also attend Mass at an Institute of Christ the King parish in Rockford, about a one hour drive from where I live (I live in the suburbs of Chicago). All the statues and crucifix are covered as expected. I went there today because I love the Gospel reading Psalm 45:9 posted. I also like the more solemn tone, as we now begin to focus on Our Lord’s Passion in preparation for the Sacred Triduum.


In the Tridentine Mass, the Gloria Patri is omitted as well as the Judica Me at the beginning of Mass.


Holy Week, and the Sacred Triduum in particular, is my favorite time of the year. Today begins my preparation for it. I can’t wait!



#11

Here’s some info about traditional Passion Sunday: [/font]

And here’s some info about Passion Tide in general:
newadvent.org/cathen/11535b.htm


#12

Actually, before 1956, the two sundays before Easter were called Passion and Palm sundays respectively. After 1956 to 1962 Palm sundays, in the altar missal, was changed to the 2nd Passion Sunday not Palm sunday as it had been called for ages.

Most people didn’t call this 2nd Sunday, 2nd Passion Sunday for it was repetitive and mosxt people didn’t know about it.


#13

[quote=katolik]Actually, before 1956, the two sundays before Easter were called Passion and Palm sundays respectively. After 1956 to 1962 Palm sundays, in the altar missal, was changed to the 2nd Passion Sunday not Palm sunday as it had been called for ages.

Most people didn’t call this 2nd Sunday, 2nd Passion Sunday for it was repetitive and mosxt people didn’t know about it.
[/quote]

Thank you for your information.


#14

[quote=Psalm45:9]The. Also, the old Gospel reading for the Fifth Sunday in Lent; which alludes to Christ’s Passion, is no longer read in any of the Liturgical lectionary cycles for that Sunday. I don’t know why, but I’m sure there was a reason.
[/quote]

the fifth Sunday of Lent was the first proclamation of the Passion in the old missal. The new missal emphasizes the events leading up to the passion, particularly the Cycle A readings from Johns gospel, which must always be used for Masses where the Lenten Rites of Christian Initiation for Adults are done, because they focus directly on the effects and biblical basis for the sacraments of initiation and the purification and enlightenment process the Elect are going through during Lent.


#15

Our parish just takes down the crucifix. The little one that is sometimes carried in is still there in front. :hmmm:


#16

Where I went to college, there were two Catholic Churches that covered all the stautues and crucifixes durring Passion Tide, I loved it!


#17

Here’s a link about currently veiling statues and crucifixes durring passion tide from the EWTN website: ewtn.org/vexperts/showmessage.asp?Pgnu=1&Pg=Forum9&recnu=25&number=429244


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.