Pastoral Provision


#1

Is the pastoral provision allowing married non-Catholic clergy to become Catholic priests only for Episcopal/Anglican clergy or are some other Protestant clergy eligible?


#2

I think someone posted here that it’s only for communities that have a clerical tradition (so like Anglicanism or Lutheranism) where their “priests” would be a different state of life. So not for those that would say that there’s nothing special about a service leader (the Baptist or non-denominational types).


#3

[quote="Arrowsmith1994, post:1, topic:210308"]
Is the pastoral provision allowing married non-Catholic clergy to become Catholic priests only for Episcopal/Anglican clergy or are some other Protestant clergy eligible?

[/quote]

You should speak to a Priest or contact your local diocese for information.

With the vast difference in different "denominations" of Christianity; particularily Protestant; no one can say with certainty which remain Priests; it is sometimes an option with Episcopal/Anglican/Lutheran Priests; with the full consent of a wife (if necessary).

Nonetheless; even if one is a convert you can pursue a normal vocation; although most seminaries or religious orders would prefer you to have a few (2-5) years as a Catholic first.


#4

A number of years ago a pentacostal minister in the Detroit area who was married was ordained a priest after he completed studies mandated by his bishop. He led most of his congregation into the Church.


#5

As we understand it, the pastoral provision can be made available to men of any Christian tradition. But it’s up to the bishop to decide who and how. Remember, the pastoral provision only applies to secular priests, not to the consecrated life. To enter an institute of consecrated life you must be either widowed or your previous marriage must be null and void. There are no exceptions.

There was a pastoral povision that allowed married people to separate and enter the religious state. The canons of 1983 did away with that. The novitiate it not valid, if you’re in a valid marriage, even if it was in another church or a natural marriage. It does not matter if you are divorced and there is no possibility of reconciliation. The marriage remains valid and you are excluded from the consecrated life. However, you are not excluded from the priesthood. You cannot become a brother, but you can become a priest, with the bishop’s permission.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :slight_smile:


#6

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