Permission from a bishop needed to marry a non-Catholic?

Is special permission needed from a bishop for a Catholic to marry a non-Catholic?

If so, who was responsible for getting that permission? I married a non-Catholic and never heard anything about this. I certainly never asked for permission nor did anyone ever tell me that anyone asked. Perhaps I didn’t hear about it because it’s not necessary.

Anyone know what I’m talking about?

In Christ,
Nancy :slight_smile:

If you got married in church, as you are also supposed to do, you had to speak to the parish priest and receive instructions in the sacrament.

If you did that, I think you can presume that the priest got the appropriate paperwork and permissions completed, so every thing should be copasetic.

Even if you didn’t see the piece of paper from the bishop yourself.

[quote=Kielbasi]If you got married in church, as you are also supposed to do, you had to speak to the parish priest and receive instructions in the sacrament.

If you did that, I think you can presume that the priest got the appropriate paperwork and permissions completed, so every thing should be copasetic.

Even if you didn’t see the piece of paper from the bishop yourself.
[/quote]

Thanks!

In Christ,
Nancy :slight_smile:

yes a Catholic requires a dispensation to marry a non-Catholic (it varies based on whether this person is baptized or not what is needed), also a dispensation is required if the ceremony will be in a place other than a Catholic Church. If you married in the Church and went through marriage preparation this was covered. You can check with your pastor.

Nancy,

Before this permission is given to a Catholic to marry a baptized non Catholic, the Catholic party is required:

(1) to promise that he|she is prepared to remove dangers of defecting from the faith him|her self, and

(2) to make a sincere promise to do all in his|her power so that all offspring are baptized and brought up in the Catholic Church.

Then the other party is to be informed so that that he|she is truly aware of the promises and obligations of the Catholic party. There is to be catechesis about marriage and its obligations.

Those promises by the Catholic are also required before this permission as well as a dispensation is given to marry a non baptized non Catholic.

While you wouldn’t have seen the paperwork and the promises did not need to be signed, you might recall these promises.

[quote=puzzleannie]yes a Catholic requires a dispensation to marry a non-Catholic (it varies based on whether this person is baptized or not what is needed), also a dispensation is required if the ceremony will be in a place other than a Catholic Church. If you married in the Church and went through marriage preparation this was covered. You can check with your pastor.
[/quote]

Actually I believe that only a Bishops permission is required for a Catholic to Mary a Baptized Non-Catholic Christian.

A Dispensation is required from the Bishop for a Marriage between a Catholic and a non-Baptized person. Because Canon Law states that a Marriage between a Catholic and a non-Baptized person is invalid. So a Bishop must dispense from the specific canon prohibiting the marriage.

Most diocese have a delegation in place so that pastors may provide the necessary dispenstation in cases of Catholics marrying another baptized Christian, so the bishop is not actually involved directly.

A decent number also allow pastors to dispense for ‘disparity of cult’, marriage to non-Baptized persons, but most retain that right, IIRC.

**2.6.10 Marriage to a Member of Another Christian Church **

Marriages between a Catholic and a baptized Christian who is not in full communion with the Catholic Church (e.g., Orthodox, Lutheran, Methodist, Baptist, etc.) are called mixed marriages. Where the two Christians are both validly baptized, the Catholic Church considers such marriages to be sacramental.

Marriages between Roman (Latin) Catholics and Eastern Catholics are NOT mixed marriages. See section 2.6.10.1 for information about Roman Catholic-Eastern Catholic marriages.

Procedure

The difficulties of mixed marriage must not be underestimated. Differences about faith and the very notion of marriage but also different religious mentalities, can become sources of tension in marriage, especially as regards the education of children. The temptation to religious indifference can then arise (Catechism of the Catholic Church, #1634).

If possible, the Catholic minister should take steps to establish contacts with the minister of the other church or ecclesial community. In general, mutual consultation between Christian pastors for supporting such marriages can be a fruitful field of ecumenical collaboration.

Since for validity where one or both partners are Catholic, the marriage has to be contracted in the presence of the Ordinary, parish pastor, the priest, or deacon delegated by either of them (Canon 1108), the Catholic canonical form is to be observed also for mixed marriages (Canon 1127). However the Ordinary of the place for grave reasons, and without prejudice to the law of the Eastern Churches, can dispense the Catholic partner from the observance of the canonical form in individual cases. See The Ecumenical Directory, 153, 154 (the reasons to justify such a dispensation are listed), and 155. If a dispensation from the canonical form has been given, it is still required for validity that there be some form of public celebration. (See Canon 1127, 2)

If a dispensation from the canonical form has been obtained and if invited to do so, a Catholic priest a Catholic priest or deacon may attend or participate in the celebration of a mixed marriage at another Christian church by offering prayers, reading from Scripture, or giving a brief exhortation. Alternately, if the Catholic priest or deacon will be presiding, he may, upon the request of the couple, invite the minister of the non-Catholic party to participate in the marriage ceremony. In any case there may be only one ceremony in which the presiding person receives the marriage vows.

Mixed marriages ordinarily follow The Rite for Celebrating Marriage Outside Mass. The Eucharist is a symbol of unity, and celebrating a Christian marriage at Mass may make the celebration awkward for both parties by highlighting their differences in faith. If circumstances justify it and the non-Catholic party agrees to their having a Mass, The Rite for Celebrating Marriage within Mass may be used. However, it must be stressed that should there be a Mass, directives of The Ecumenical Directory (159/160) and the Code of Canon Law (Canon 844) concerning reception of the Eucharist are to be observed. Couples should consult with their priest about this delicate matter.

In all mixed marriages, permission for a mixed marriage must be requested. The parish priest will assist in this simple procedure. To obtain permission, the Catholic party will be asked to affirm in some way (verbally or in writing) that he or she will do all in his/her power to see that the children of the marriage are baptized and educated in the Catholic faith. The other partner is to be informed of these promises and responsibilities; the non-Catholic partner may feel a similar obligation because of his/her own Christian commitment. No formal written or oral promise is required of the non-Catholic partner. In carrying out this duty of transmitting the Catholic faith to the children, the Catholic parent will do so with respect for the religious freedom and conscience of the other parent and with due regard for the unity and permanence of the marriage and for the maintenance of the communion of the family. It is important that during the marriage preparation, both partners together discuss the Catholic baptism and education of the children they will have, and, where possible, come to a decision on this question before marriage (The Ecumenical Directory, 150).

Bro SFO is as usual being properly precise with terminology and using words to mean exactly what they mean, for which we thank him, he is correct. forgot to add, if any kind of dispensation or permission as required for your marriage, that will be noted in the marriage record book, and noted on the marriage certificate.

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