Personal Lord and Savior


#1

Can anyone help me with why Catholics don’t 'accept Jesus as their Personal Lord and Savior"? I don’t mean, why don’t we think we are saved forever from one act, I mean, is there something intrinsically against Catholic teaching about Christ being a personal savior? Scripture, Church Fathers?
Why do Catholics not speak of a “personal” Jesus?
( I am not looking for a dissection on Evangelical Protestantism)
Thanks,
mommyjo2


#2

He is, we just don’t use that style language.

I’ve heard many priests speak of how very personal our relationship with the lord is. Catholics, the ones I know and myself, simply didn’t grow up with that style language, nor have cultivated its use. Read the lives of the saints- it’s edvident how very personal our relationship with the Lord should be :slight_smile:


#3

Of course Catholics accept Jesus as their personal Lord and Savior—why do you think otherwise? We just don’t often put it that way. Just a matter of style, no more.


#4

[quote=Sherlock]Of course Catholics accept Jesus as their personal Lord and Savior—why do you think otherwise? We just don’t often put it that way. Just a matter of style, no more.
[/quote]

Ditto.


#5

What I mean was, why is that terminology considered… not Catholic? Is there a deeper or hidden meaning I am not seeing/understanding?
Of course Christ is my personal Savior, as I am a person…
I guess I am asking a language question?


#6

Its just that the teaching is not sufficient. For example, we can accept Jesus as our personal Lord and Savior, but still rebel against Him by mortal sin because we think one of His teachings are wrong, and die unrepentant and end up in hell.

Thus, we not only have to accept Jesus and believe in Him, we also must obey Him.

Also, we are not saved the moment we accept Jesus. Under normal condictions it is not until we are baptized that we are saved from our sins. St. Paul was not saved from his sins the moment he believed. His sins were not washed away until he was baptized.


#7

[quote=mommyjo2]Can anyone help me with why Catholics don’t 'accept Jesus as their Personal Lord and Savior"? I don’t mean, why don’t we think we are saved forever from one act, I mean, is there something intrinsically against Catholic teaching about Christ being a personal savior? Scripture, Church Fathers?
Why do Catholics not speak of a “personal” Jesus?
( I am not looking for a dissection on Evangelical Protestantism)
Thanks,
mommyjo2
[/quote]

This should help you. :slight_smile: [size=5]Are Catholics Born Again?

Catholics and Protestants agree that to be saved, you have to be born again. Jesus said so: “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God” (John 3:3).

When a Catholic says that he has been “born again,” he refers to the transformation that God’s grace accomplished in him during baptism. Evangelical Protestants typically mean something quite different when they talk about being “born again.”

For an Evangelical, becoming “born again” often happens like this: He goes to a crusade or a revival where a minister delivers a sermon telling him of his need to be “born again.”

“If you believe in the Lord Jesus Christ and believe he died for your sins, you’ll be born again!” says the preacher. So the gentleman makes “a decision for Christ” and at the altar call goes forward to be led in “the sinner’s prayer” by the minister. Then the minister tells all who prayed the sinner’s prayer that they have been saved—“born again.” But is the minister right? Not according to the Bible. [/size]


#8

Of course Jesus should be your personal Lord and Savior :slight_smile: We just don’t often say that - or push it. But it’s still quite true.

Let’s put it this way; if someone was “saved” the moment they accepted Jesus, but then turned into a criminal that refused to ever accept Jesus, is he still saved?


#9

This may not come out right, but let me give it a try. Each of us is the result of a thought of God. We’re His idea. We belong to Him. The talents we have are gifts from Him to give to others. We are called by Christ to die to ourselves. To say that Christ is my “personal” anything implies that I have some kind of ownership in Him. That it’s all about the “me.” Yes, Jesus is my savior, but He’s not just mine. The word “personal” just doesn’t fit. I do have a one on one relationship with Him; however, it is joyfully a master slave relationship.


#10

I never thought about that, David! And it actually makes some sense, too - saying, “Jesus is my personal savior” is almost like being able to say, “This television is my personal savior” because it’s actually about YOU.

Still, Jesus is your savior, so bond with Him :wink:


#11

I’d be interested in knowing the origin of this phrase since those exact words are not found in Scripture (I don’t mean that in a negative way at all - I really would like to know how the phrase came about.)

Why haven’t Catholics ‘adopted’ it? I think it’s because it has come to be analogous to being ‘born again’, which is not what the Catholic Church teaches (we are ‘born again’ through baptism).
So, yes, Jesus is our personal Lord and Savior, but this term has taken on an additional meaning beyond what the words say. So although the words are accurate,part of the belief associated with the ‘words’ are not. Does that help?

Oh, one more thought - we are not be lone ranger Christians. Jesus founded a Church. So, yes, while he is ‘my personal savior’, it is not just ‘me and Jesus’. We are part of the Body of Christ. I think the term can also imply that it doesn’t matter what Church we belong to as long as ‘me and Jesus’ are okay. Perhaps that’s another reason it hasn’t been adopted.


#12

We recieve Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, his body, soul, blood, divinity. His real presence is coursing through our veins. How much more of a personal relationship can you have? When we go up to recieve Jesus and say amen, we accept not only the real presence but him as lord and saviour.


#13

[quote=StCsDavid]This may not come out right, but let me give it a try. Each of us is the result of a thought of God. We’re His idea. We belong to Him. The talents we have are gifts from Him to give to others. We are called by Christ to die to ourselves. To say that Christ is my “personal” anything implies that I have some kind of ownership in Him. That it’s all about the “me.” Yes, Jesus is my savior, but He’s not just mine. The word “personal” just doesn’t fit. I do have a one on one relationship with Him; however, it is joyfully a master slave relationship.
[/quote]

You said what I was trying to say in my last paragraph much better than I did. Thank you!


#14

Catholics not only have a Personal Relationship With Jesus - we have an intimate one - through the celebration of the Eucharist.

It is much more than just a personal one …

:slight_smile:


#15

The phrase annoys me, even though I was reared Baptist and Jesus has been my “personal” Savior since I was 7. If I’m asked this, I always want to say,“No, He’s my IMpersonal savior. We agreed He would save me, but He wouldn’t be breathing down my neck. He stops by for coffee once and a while, though.” Of COURSE, HE’s our personal Savior!!!


#16

[quote=MGEISING]Catholics not only have a Personal Relationship With Jesus - we have an intimate one - through the celebration of the Eucharist.

It is much more than just a personal one …

:slight_smile:
[/quote]

Ah, yes! I read/heard this same thought of sorts recently. One may have a “personal relationship” with their neighbor or teacher or friend, but the terminology just doesn’t do justice to the deep intimacy that we must have with Jesus Christ!

He, in every way, is my Savior and Lord, but to limit our relationship as a “personal” one doesn’t seem to fit into the Biblical model for what our relationship truly is supposed to be.

Beginning in the Old Covenant, God promised his people a Messiah that would come to redeem the whole world. He was never meant to be solely a “personal Lord and Savior”–that is true, but not the whole sense of his mission of salvation. He came to make us FAMILY.

I have five siblings. I can not imagine talking to one of my siblings and saying “Dad is my personal Father.” To claim my Father as my own would be true in a sense, but it doesn’t recognize that he their Father, too. In the same way, to speak of Christ as “my personal Lord and Savior” is sometimes to ignore the beautiful relationship of family that Jesus Christ won for us through his death and rising!

There is nothing, in my mind, intrinsically wrong with the words of “personal Lord and Savior,” but I think it is a more a cultural term than a Biblical one. It, in essence, is a “tradition.” It is not a bad one, nor one that I would reject totally, but I do feel that it is somewhat lacking and evidence of a man-made cultural divide.

That being said, I think the idea of God becoming a “personal” One rather than the Old Testament idea of the God of our fathers (the Old Covenant communal sense) has a good rooting in the New Testament when the Gentiles were brought into the New Israel, the Church. The Gentiles had long been practicing their religion with the recognition and worship of “personal” lords and gods. They, in their homes and temples, would construct altars for worshipping and honoring their “personal” favorite gods–fertility, harvest, etc–who they depended on in a very personal way for prosperity and health. This was not always the common communal worship often seen in Judaism, but a more private and “personal” approach to seeking divine mediation (albeit, false in the case of the Gentiles and pagans). In fact, St. Paul recongizes this practice among the Greeks and tells them in Acts 17, that the altar that they have for “A God Unknown” is actually going to be made know to them as the One true God, Jesus Christ. In this way, St. Paul helps build the bridge between “God’s offspring” (Acts 17:28-29). It puts God in familiar terms for the Gentiles and introduces a new perspective for the Jewish Christians.

This personal approach to lordship certainly influenced the early Christians in many ways. The melding of Old Testament Judaism and the new Gentile converts to Christianity certainly has provided us (some 2000 years later) with a broader perspective of who Jesus Christ is and how we come to know Him as Lord of all AND our personal Savior!

As a Catholic, I appreciate our Church’s comprehensive teaching and great latitude in allowing us to develop the relationship with Jesus Christ that fulfills His will for our lives!


#17

Mommyjo2:

Glad you came here to ask that question. Even though I’m not Joaquin Navarro Valls(Vatican Spokesman), I would like to definitievely describe to you what practicing Catholics ‘feel/think’ about Christ being our personal Lord and Savior.

I accept Jesus as my personal Lord and savior…

…when I was baptized through my parents and godparents
…everytime I do my morning prayers.
…everytime I genuflect in front of the tabernacle
…everytime I make the sign of the cross
…everytime I pray before meals
…everytime I go to Confession
…when I was Confirmed
…when I got Married
…everytime I go to Mass and recieve the Most Holy Eucharist
…everytime I pray the bible through the Holy Rosary
…everytime I pray with my wife at bedtime
…everytime I drive, play, work and talk to people
…everytime I do my aspirations and mortifications.
…etc. etc.

How could we possibly put a date on that when it permeates every second of our lives? Our syntax is different…up until the Reformation, not a single Christian funneled their love for Christ in the form: I accept Jesus as my Lord and Savior. To us, this is the GIVEN. It needs not mention for we express it in a plethora of ways.

Please disregard what you may have been taught regarding Catholic’s acceptance of Christ as Lord and Savior…Of course he is our Lord and Savior, otherwise, what have we been doing for the past two thousand years?

I hope you want to know more about this and keep posting, most likely your impressions of the Catholic faith are derived from your educators…please give us a fair trial by asking us and study what we believe and strive for.

in XT.


#18

You are asking two questions here. Do Catholics think that Jesus is their Lord and Savior, and do Catholics think that they are “saved” by a one-time act?

Faithful Catholics do believe that Jesus is their Lord and their Savior. Stating that Jesus is my personal Lord, and my personal Savior is redundant. How could the relationship with Jesus as my Lord be anything other than personal? And if Jesus is my Savior, he is, of course, my personal Savior.

Catholics rightly object to the presumption of the “Once Saved, Always Saved” Protestant that thinks he is saved by a “one time act”. The belief in salvation through a “one time act” implies that keeping a continuing relationship with Jesus as one’s Lord is NOT necessary for his salvation. (Which is why Protestants that preach the heresy of antinomianism are said to believe in Non-Lordship Salvation.)

The antinomian OSAS Protestants believe that once they get “saved”, that there is NO sin that they could commit that would make them lose their salvation. No sin, none whatsoever, no matter how horrible, no matter how depraved, not even dying as an unrepentant Satan worshipping backslider could damn a “saved” man to Hell. If that were true, then a “saved” man is free to totally reject having Jesus as his Lord, since having a relationship with Jesus as Lord necessarily means obeying Jesus. "Why do you call me `Lord, Lord,’ and not do what I tell you?”
Luke 6:46

…he who does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God rests upon him.
John 3:36

"Not every one who says to me, `Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven.”
Matt. 7:21Antinomian OSAS Protestants believe that they only need to have a relationship with Jesus as their Savior in order to enter Heaven - having a relationship with Jesus as their Lord is strictly opional.

Catholics reject the heresy of antinomianism. Catholics believe that to enter Heaven that they must lovingly obey the commandments of God, and that necessarily means entering a relationship with Jesus as their Lord that is not optional.


#19

[quote=mommyjo2] Can anyone help me with why Catholics don’t 'accept Jesus as their Personal Lord and Savior"?

[/quote]

Note that your question(Why don’t Catholics) is simultaneously an allegation(Catholics don’t accept Jesus as Personal) - and the allegation is false. This makes it impossible to answer without implying something that simply isnt true. An example of this would be if I asked you, “Have you stopped cheating on your husband yet?” A yes answer implicates you once cheated on him, a no answer implies you still are - either way you’re admitting guilt when none exists. Jesus Christ is my personal Lord and Savior and I am Catholic.

Again, they do - they simply don’t dwell on the phrase as an attempt to distinguish themselves from other Christians - which is often what proponents of this terminology are doing. Im trying to think of any biblical reference in the NT which describes Jesus as a “personal” Lord and Savior. Can anyone produce such a verse?

Phil


#20

I would also add, to the many excellent responses here, that Catholic theology is very familial: we are part of a family. It’s not just about “me n’ Jesus”, it’s about our whole family, with our brothers and sisters on earth; with our triumphant family of saints in heaven; with our suffering brothers and sisters in Purgatory. The “I, me, my” aspect of “Jesus Christ is my own personal Lord and Saviour” has always turned me off (even in my Protestant years) because it seemed so isolated and even self-centered.


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