Perspectives; John Updike

Inventory will consume the next few days. Perspectives will resume next week.

John Hoyer Updike (1932 – 2009) was an American novelist, poet, short-story writer, art critic, and literary critic. One of only three writers to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction more than once (the others being Booth Tarkington and William Faulkner), Updike published more than twenty novels, more than a dozen short-story collections, as well as poetry, art and literary criticism and children’s books during his career.

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“It is easy to love people in memory; the hard thing is to love them when they are there in front of you.”

“The true New Yorker secretly believes that people living anywhere else have to be, in some sense, kidding.”

“We do survive every moment, after all, except the last one.”

“How can you respect the world when you see it’s being run by a bunch of kids turned old?”

“We are fated to love one another; we hardly exist outside our love, we are just animals without it, with a birth and a death and constant fear between. Our love has lifted us up, out of the dreadfulness of merely living.”

“The world keeps ending but new people too dumb to know it keep showing up as if the fun’s just started.”

“Looking foolish does the spirit good. The need not to look foolish is one of youth’s many burdens; as we get older we are exempted from it more and more.”

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