Peter first Pope?


#1

I know and i firmly believe that peter was the first pope but i was hoping to find proof (bible) because everytime my mother in law comes she like to bring me down in this subject… any info would really help.

Thank you,

ROB


#2

I recommend going to these links:

catholic.com/library/church_papacy.asp

scripturecatholic.com/primacy_of_peter.html

Downloads: bringyou.to/apologetics/audio.htm

Note the word Pope is not mention in the Bible. The name Pope came from the word Papa, which means Father.


#3

wonder how Peter’s mother-in-law regarded this topic (just can’t help speculating)


#4
  1. Mathew 3:16. While protestants like to mince words and change the meaning of “you are” to fit their own man made beliefs, this verse CLEARLY states that Peter was the rock on which Christ’s church was to be built.

  2. Later in the Gospels (i forget where): Jesus entrusts PETER of all the disciples with the charge to feed and look after His sheep. The command is clear: “Peter, in my absense YOU are the shepherd”

  3. Acts: The first council of the church is recorded in the book of acts and it is readily apparent that the other disciples (the bishopry of the church) all defer to Peter, the bishop of Rome.

  4. Early Church Fathers: by as early as 100 AD (and before) the early church fathers were already writing about the primacy of Peter, the Pope, the magisterial authority of the Bishop of Rome, etc etc. As some protestants are fond of saying “if it’s new, it ain’t true” and the belief that Peter was not the first pope is certainly new by comparison to what the doctors of the church were writing for the first 1,000 years after Christ was ascended.


#5

Note Luke 22:24-32

A dispute also arose among them, which of them was to be regarded as the greatest.

25] And he said to them, "The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and those in authority over them are called benefactors.
26] But not so with you; rather let the greatest among you become as the youngest, and the leader as one who serves.
27] For which is the greater, one who sits at table, or one who serves? Is it not the one who sits at table? But I am among you as one who serves.
28]
"You are those who have continued with me in my trials;

29] and I assign to you, as my Father assigned to me, a kingdom,
30] that you may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom, and sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel.
31]
"Simon, Simon, behold, Satan demanded to have you, that he might sift you like wheat,

32] but I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail; and when you have turned again, strengthen your brethren."

Jesus prays for only Peter. Peter is charged with caring for the rest.


#6

or his wife


#7

Was Peter married at the time of his ministry?


#8

Yes


#9

C’mon, go the extra mile. Demonstrate your assertion.


#10

Why, all you have to do is actually read the Gospels. We can’t do all the leg work for people. Ok, fine:

Mat 8:14 And when Jesus was come into Peter’s house, he saw his wife’s mother lying sick of a fever.

Mar 1:30 Now Simon’s wife’s mother lay sick of a fever; and straightway they tell him of her:

Luk 4:38 And he rose up from the synagogue, and entered into the house of Simon. And Simon’s wife’s mother was holden with a great fever; and they besought him for her.


#11

Healing Peter’s Mother-in-law

Matt 8:14; Mark 1:30; Luke 4:38


#12

While it is likely that Peter’s wife was still living at this time, the passages you cite here say nothing of her. They speak only of her mother. All we can know is that Peter WAS married and may still have been married. He also may have been a widower. The Gospels do not say.


#13

Ah, the familiar “if you’d just read the bible for yourself” dig…

Mat 8:14 And when Jesus was come into Peter’s house, he saw his wife’s mother lying sick of a fever.

Mar 1:30 Now Simon’s wife’s mother lay sick of a fever; and straightway they tell him of her:

Luk 4:38 And he rose up from the synagogue, and entered into the house of Simon. And Simon’s wife’s mother was holden with a great fever; and they besought him for her.

I see no evidence in these passages that Peter’s wife was or was not alive at this point. Am I wrong?


#14

Yes, the greek implies a present state. Further, it is also a matter of tradition that Peter was married. From the Catholic Encyclopedia:

Simon settled in Capharnaum, where he was living with his mother-in-law in his own house (Matthew 8:14; Luke 4:38) at the beginning of Christ’s public ministry (about A.D. 26-28). Simon was thus married, and, according to Clement of Alexandria (Stromata, III, vi, ed. Dindorf, II, 276), had children. The same writer relates the tradition that Peter’s wife suffered martyrdom (ibid., VII, xi ed. cit., III, 306). Concerning these facts, adopted by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., III, xxxi) from Clement, the ancient Christian literature which has come down to us is silent. Simon pursued in Capharnaum the profitable occupation of fisherman in Lake Genesareth, possessing his own boat (Luke 5:3).


#15

Could you please elucidate that for us?


#16

Yes. It is in the present tense as opposed to another tense and the mode does not modify. Sometimes in english we play hard and fast with tense but that is not the case in Koine or in Hebrew which is probably the original language for Matthew. So, understanding the gramatical rules in a passage is paramount to uderstanding the meaning. This is part of the First sense of Scripture.

Mat 8:14 και ελθων ο ιησους εις την οικιαν πετρου ειδεν την πενθεραν αυτου βεβλημενην και πυρεσσουσαν


#17

OK then, the Greek conveys more than the English. Fair enough.

And I didn’t know those traditions about Peter’s wife being martyred.

Well, it really was just a question. Peter’s papacy by no means lives or dies on his maritial state.


#18

Thank you. I guess my Greek isn’t good enough to understand how this makes the case that the wife is still alive.

I’m not arguing for a dead wife here. Just can’t get my arms around the certainty that she is alive.

Side note: I personally speculate that one of the reasons for the first great draft of fish was to pay for the support of Peter’s and James’ families while they took a leave of absence from the fishing business to follow Jesus.


#19

True, in fact all of the first Popes were married. I don’t recall who was the first celebate Pope but it was a few hundred years into the history of the Church.


#20

Regarding Peter’s wife, you might take a look at this article/link:

members.aol.com/insight944/APOL/Celibacy.html


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