Picking Names For Religious


#1

How do Religious Orders pick names for the Novices? I heard that most Religious Orders have the soon-to-be Novice pick three names, and they choose one of them, but I wanted to know if this is true? If it is, is this how the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal do it?


#2

Bump. I want to know too. I think some places just use their baptismal name. I have heard of the 3 name thing from a Franciscan order guy I met. I haven’t looked into this thing too much though.


#3

I think some orders assign you a name. Didn’t that happen with St. Therese of Lisieux?


#4

A large number of religious institutes - probably a majority - don’t ask that their members change their names.

Particular arrangements will be explained to you by whichever institute you approach, and only they can give this information accurately; but in those that do still follow this custom, it may be that they will ask you for a shortlist, or it may be that they will simply assign the name.


#5

It does vary according to the order. My brother-in-law’s niece is a sister. She prayed and submitted three names to Mother who then chose the one. I think that many orders let you have a say in it.


#6

I’ve been secretly hoping some of the obscure names make a comeback. St. Wilibrard, anyone? :smiley:


#7

[quote="ATeutonicKnight, post:1, topic:261832"]
How do Religious Orders pick names for the Novices? I heard that most Religious Orders have the soon-to-be Novice pick three names, and they choose one of them, but I wanted to know if this is true? If it is, is this how the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal do it?

[/quote]

That is how it was done with me. Keep in mind, however, that your superior is not bound by your list of 3 names. He can pick an entirely different name if he wants to. usualy hyou get your first choice but not always. I cannot speeak for the CFR's


#8

[quote="PhilomenaJohn2, post:6, topic:261832"]
I've been secretly hoping some of the obscure names make a comeback. St. Wilibrard, anyone? :D

[/quote]

Some superiors will deliberately not give you an obscure name (like Willibrord or Cyneburga) because the ones who want the obscure names tend not to persevere.


#9

Hm… I wonder why that is?


#10

I’m guessing, but perhaps because those who want to stand out and be unique have a hard time ordering their lives to the discipline of the order and the “hidden” life often necessary for a consecrated religious (particularly those who are cloistered).


#11

[quote="Tabby, post:10, topic:261832"]
I'm guessing, but perhaps because those who want to stand out and be unique have a hard time ordering their lives to the discipline of the order and the "hidden" life often necessary for a consecrated religious (particularly those who are cloistered).

[/quote]

Well, there is no hidden life with the Friars or Sisters. They go out into the world and help people. Unlike the Monasteries and Convents of the cloistered Orders, the Friaries and Convents of the Friars and Sisters allow people in, and they are not held down by the Rule to bar the doors shut to visitors. Cloistered Orders are so strict about this that Benedictine Monasteries don't allow women to enter the hallway that leads into the cells (Rooms), so half (If not more) of the Monastery is completely barred off from women, if they're lucky enough to get in at all! Friars and Sisters (Especially Franciscans) are very flexible in terms of this, while most other Orders are not, so in their case it is not a "hidden life". However, with the Monastic Orders, it most certainly is.


#12

[quote="ATeutonicKnight, post:11, topic:261832"]
Well, there is no hidden life with the Friars or Sisters. They go out into the world and help people. Unlike the Monasteries and Convents of the cloistered Orders, the Friaries and Convents of the Friars and Sisters allow people in, and they are not held down by the Rule to bar the doors shut to visitors. Cloistered Orders are so strict about this that Benedictine Monasteries don't allow women to enter the hallway that leads into the cells (Rooms), so half (If not more) of the Monastery is completely barred off from women, if they're lucky enough to get in at all! Friars and Sisters (Especially Franciscans) are very flexible in terms of this, while most other Orders are not, so in their case it is not a "hidden life". However, with the Monastic Orders, it most certainly is.

[/quote]

Even with Friars and Sisters though there is an element of 'hidden-ness' because one is not doing those things for their own glory but the glory of the Lord. If someone is of the temperament where they want to be unique and stand out then they may still be unsuited to that life because the focus is still away from their self. And even things like having to dress the same as the others in the order and being just one of the brethren may be difficult for them.

I never really thought about how the names were chosen, though I've thought about what name I would choose. I know the order I am discerning joining take new names when the women enter the novitiate, it is a Benedictine order, but I don't know how it works exactly - I'm still way at the beginning of discernment, I haven't even visited them yet.


#13

Well, I think you’re confusing “hidden-life” with what the intention of the life is.

That’s cool. I hope when you visit them you have a lot of fun. When my sister visited a group of Sisters she had a great time. I’m sure when you do it will be even greater than you think it will be.


#14

[quote="ATeutonicKnight, post:11, topic:261832"]
Well, there is no hidden life with the Friars or Sisters. They go out into the world and help people. Unlike the Monasteries and Convents of the cloistered Orders, the Friaries and Convents of the Friars and Sisters allow people in, and they are not held down by the Rule to bar the doors shut to visitors. Cloistered Orders are so strict about this that Benedictine Monasteries don't allow women to enter the hallway that leads into the cells (Rooms), so half (If not more) of the Monastery is completely barred off from women, if they're lucky enough to get in at all! Friars and Sisters (Especially Franciscans) are very flexible in terms of this, while most other Orders are not, so in their case it is not a "hidden life". However, with the Monastic Orders, it most certainly is.

[/quote]

What abbeys have you been to? All of the ones I've been to don't let anyone into the cloister, besides the monks/nuns and those on formal discernment events, and for very good reason; the cloister is to be the monastic's place away from the world where they can go to rest in the Peace of Christ. That is their vocation, to tend to the Opus Dei; everything else a monastery does is purely incidental, and is not necessary to their life.

Also, I've never heard of a monastery, except maybe the Carthusians, but they don't allow any visitors, barring just women from their monastery; doesn't mean it doesn't happen, I've just never seen or heard it.:shrug:

To answer the OP: it depends on the Order. Most monastic Orders, and I believe the Dominicans too, use the process you described, and others don't allow their new members to take different names.

Here's a thread that goes into good detail about this topic:
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=545499&highlight=religious+names


#15

[quote="Nowhere_Man, post:14, topic:261832"]
What abbeys have you been to? All of the ones I've been to don't let anyone into the cloister, besides the monks/nuns and those on formal discernment events, and for very good reason; the cloister is to be the monastic's place away from the world where they can go to rest in the Peace of Christ. That is their vocation, to tend to the Opus Dei; everything else a monastery does is purely incidental, and is not necessary to their life.

Also, I've never heard of a monastery, except maybe the Carthusians, but they don't allow any visitors, barring just women from their monastery; doesn't mean it doesn't happen, I've just never seen or heard it.:shrug:

To answer the OP: it depends on the Order. Most monastic Orders, and I believe the Dominicans too, use the process you described, and others don't allow their new members to take different names.

Here's a thread that goes into good detail about this topic:
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=545499&highlight=religious+names

[/quote]

Well, they let young men that are discerning in. They don't let random people in the hallway that leads to the cells or anything, but if anyone is to enter, women cannot under any circumstance. They might break this rule in a war-time situation, but it does go against the Rule of Saint Benedict, if I'm not mistaken.

Well, that's depressing for me to know. I want to be a Franciscan. Maybe I'll swap and become a Dominican instead. They do have those awesome capes... :D


#16

[quote="PhilomenaJohn2, post:6, topic:261832"]
I've been secretly hoping some of the obscure names make a comeback. St. Wilibrard, anyone? :D

[/quote]

I'm thinking when I become a nun to have a Spanish name. Like:
Sr. Maria Rosaria
or
Sr. Maria Cruzita


#17

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#18

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