Placing the Consecrated Host on the Corporal


#1

I am a deacon and recently served Mass with a retired guest priest in our parish. He refused to use a paten during the Mass, not only for distribution of Holy Communion, but for the principal host as well. After the elevation he simply placed the consecrated Host on the corporal and not in any sacred vessel. I have never seen this before in my life and it struck me as wrong.

It's a difficult topic to search as I can't seem to find the correct terminology to direct me to any documents that might concern this. The GIRM, paragraphs 78, 79, 141 and 151 address the actions but not if the paten must be used.

Can anyone refer me to a document that addresses or discusses the use of the paten for the host? I have also asked this question of our diocesan liturgical expert and am awaiting his answer. I am discerning if this needs to be mentioned to the bishop.

Thanks!


#2

far from a priest but how about this: newadvent.org/cathen/11541b.htm


#3

[quote="deacon2011, post:1, topic:351316"]
I am a deacon and recently served Mass with a retired guest priest in our parish. He refused to use a paten during the Mass, not only for distribution of Holy Communion, but for the principal host as well. After the elevation he simply placed the consecrated Host on the corporal and not in any sacred vessel. I have never seen this before in my life and it struck me as wrong.

It's a difficult topic to search as I can't seem to find the correct terminology to direct me to any documents that might concern this. The GIRM, paragraphs 78, 79, 141 and 151 address the actions but not if the paten must be used.

Can anyone refer me to a document that addresses or discusses the use of the paten for the host? I have also asked this question of our diocesan liturgical expert and am awaiting his answer. I am discerning if this needs to be mentioned to the bishop.

Thanks!

[/quote]

Given that he's an older priest (or rather, assuming so since he's retired), my guess is that this is a hang-on from the 1962 Missal. In the Extraordinary Form (and probably the first few versions of the Mass of Paul VI) the "principal host" had to be placed directly on the corporal, with no option for using the paten during the Eucharistic Prayer until after the consecration.

This is because the corporal is meant to represent Calvary, and sacrifice, while the paten is a plate which represents the meal aspect. The sacrifice must take place before the meal.

That being said, I don't think it's a major problem.

If this is allowed by the rubrics, with the host being on the corporal beforehand, and the paten afterwards, I think it has a beautiful bit of symbolism around it.

That being said, I think you did the right thing by referring to the diocese's liturgist. Please let us know if he comes back to you with a verdict!


#4

[quote="L_Marshall, post:3, topic:351316"]
Given that he's an older priest (or rather, assuming so since he's retired), my guess is that this is a hang-on from the 1962 Missal. In the Extraordinary Form (and probably the first few versions of the Mass of Paul VI) the "principal host" had to be placed directly on the corporal, with no option for using the paten during the Eucharistic Prayer until after the consecration.

This is because the corporal is meant to represent Calvary, and sacrifice, while the paten is a plate which represents the meal aspect. The sacrifice must take place before the meal.

That being said, I don't think it's a major problem.

If this is allowed by the rubrics, with the host being on the corporal beforehand, and the paten afterwards, I think it has a beautiful bit of symbolism around it.

That being said, I think you did the right thing by referring to the diocese's liturgist. Please let us know if he comes back to you with a verdict!

[/quote]

Agree.


#5

Isn’t the corporal also a representation of the burial cloth?


#6

Thanks for the replies.

L Marshall: Your response was very charitable and insightful but a clarification is necessary. He never used the paten, before or after consecration. That is what bothered me. The consecrated host was placed on the corporal during the entire liturgy of the eucharist.

We have a somewhat traditional parish and use a chalice veil and burse. Prior to Mass this priest had the sacristan remove the chalice veil, burse and the paten. I will update this post when I hear back from our diocesan liturgist.

Thanks again to all!


#7

Hm.

I would say it was a traditional hold-over, but if he never used a paten... can't say that I have ever encountered this. As stated above, the old rite allows for the principal host to be placed on the corporal. But if he never used a paten... possible abuse? Definitely check with the liturgist.


#8

I was going to say "old school" as well as I know some Traditional Anglicans do the same. After the Mass, the corporal is soaked in water and therefore any crumbs dissolved.

Curious, what is your concern with his doing it that way?


#9

[quote="deacon2011, post:1, topic:351316"]
I am a deacon and recently served Mass with a retired guest priest in our parish. He refused to use a paten during the Mass, not only for distribution of Holy Communion, but for the principal host as well. After the elevation he simply placed the consecrated Host on the corporal and not in any sacred vessel. I have never seen this before in my life and it struck me as wrong.

It's a difficult topic to search as I can't seem to find the correct terminology to direct me to any documents that might concern this. The GIRM, paragraphs 78, 79, 141 and 151 address the actions but not if the paten must be used.

Can anyone refer me to a document that addresses or discusses the use of the paten for the host? I have also asked this question of our diocesan liturgical expert and am awaiting his answer. I am discerning if this needs to be mentioned to the bishop.

Thanks!

[/quote]

In the Extraordinary form, the consecrated host is always placed on the corporal. It is starched to make scraping up the particles easier. The reason the corporal is folded a certain way is to protect consecrated particles from being lost. After, the corporal must be properly purified.


#10

Here’s the reply from our diocesan liturgist:

In the pre-Vatican II liturgy the celebrant’s host was placed directly on the corporal from the offertory prayers until after the Our Father. In the current rite this is not really done, though I have on occasion seen the Bishop do it while the paten is passed around to the concelebrating priests. The corporal is so named because the body of Christ is placed on it. It would probably be prudent to “scrape” the corporal with a paten (after Mass) to purify it of any particles, or at least make sure it is adequately soaked before being laundered.


#11

I definitely remember that priests would “scrape” the corporal with the paten and then purify the paten and chalice after Communion.


#12

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