Plane Goes Down in Hudson River

Emergency officials are responding to a downed plane in the Hudson River in New York City, according to the city fire and police departments. The FAA confirmed US Airways Flight 1549, an Airbus A320 headed from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte, North Carolina, was down in the river following a failed takeoff.

The U.S. Coast Guard said units were also responding, and a ferry on site was dropping life jackets into the water.

The plane approached the water at a gradual angle and made a big splash, according to a witness watching from an office building.
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Let’s pray for those poor people!

I was just going to post this. Those poor people - it is so cold. It looks like crews really scrambled to get to the them though… prayers that they are ok. :gopray:

They just said on ABC the plane went down at 3:03 (Hour of Mercy!) and they apparently got everybody safely off the plane.

This could have been a huge tragedy! Thank you Jesus!

How absolutely terrifying!!! :eek:

I really do not like to fly. Ugh.

Thanks be to God that everyone is ok!!

~Liza

That is amazing! I am so impressed that they have apparently rescued everyone!

Cold and wet, maybe - but alive! What a great ending to what could have been a horrible story! :thumbsup:

God bless this pilot and crew of this plane and all their guardian angels for protecting the lives all the souls aboard. You know it always amazes me, that the actual technical terminology the authorities use is that they call all people onboard, both crew and passengers as “souls”. Wouldn’t it be nice if the world recognized that term for everyone they meet as well!

thank you God for sparing the lives of people on the ground as well. Our son is a commercial pilot but is still in training for the big birds. The training these pilots study for is incredible. Thank you again God for this pilot and crew and all the first respondersThey did an incredible job in saving lives. :thumbsup:

This is truly truly MIRACULOUS!!! Sweet Jesus, thank you!!! Listening to reports online, CBS reported that the pilots had only one shot to land that plane safely. In other words, they had to land that plane absolutely perfectly with not a single misstep. The reporter said that the precision it took was nothing less than amazing! He said the aviation people he spoke with said they didn’t know how they did it without a catastrophe. One of the passengers interviewed said that all passengers were safe, there were some with leg injuries, and they were being treated for hypothermia, but they were all alive!!

I would say their guardian angels were working overtime!! Our God is an AWESOME GOD!!

I saw one of the passengers on the plane being intereviewed and he said when the pilot came on and announced that they needed to prepare for water landing and to brace themselves for it, alot of people onboard started to pray. To Him go the glory!!! (and the pilot too who obviously is cool under pressure!:thumbsup: )

What a miracle! Thank you, God. :slight_smile:

Amen.

Praise the Lord and good pilot training.:gopray2:

Oh the crew too.

Hey, I am a pilot and I have to tell you that ditching a place (landing in the water) is a seriously difficult and dangerous maneuver. When learning to fly, we were all cautioned against ditching in water if there were any other viable places to make a forced landing, even going down in a forest is considered more survivable that ditching in the water.

Remember, the engines on this plane are mounted in nacelles under each wing and would have been the first part of the aircraft to contact the water. Generally, when ditching, the landing gear is not extended. This is not done to slow flooding but rather to increase, slightly, the extremely low odds that the at least a few of the passengers might survive the ditching.

Let me try to sum it up in an easy way. As a plane approaches the ground (surface in this case) when it gets to a height equivalent to about 1 wing length, the air under the wing starts to compress, this is called “ground effect”. When landing in water there are, obviously, waves. When a wave is under one wing and not the other, ground effect will cause that wing to rise, and the other wing to fall, banking the airplane. In the case of a jet like this where the engine nacelles are under the wing, that usually forces one engine into the water. The water acts as an immediate brake cause the plane to spin on that wing, rotate and break up spewing fuel and, well, people. Not good.

Even when this does not happen, and the to engine nacelles hit the water essentially simultaneously, a very difficult thing to accomplish, the will, again, act as sudden brakes and usually forcing the plane’s nose down and slamming it violently into the water. Also not good.

If the pilot tries to keep the nose up and in doing so the tail hits the water first, he will immediately lose roll control. The tail will probably break apart, and, as the plane rolls over, first one wing, then the fuselage will break up.

None of these appear to have happened.

In this case, and I am speculating here, the pilot appeared to be ready for contact with the water and kept the nose up, only enough so it was the back of the engine nacelles, not the air intake in the front, that must have contacted the water first. And they must have contacted the water essentially simultaneously. That, I will tell, is exceptional piloting ability. If I am not mistakes, this may be one of the only times, in the history of jet airliners, that a plane successfully ditched without breaking up. Oh yeah, God was there alright.

Now, after the plan is in the water and stopped, the cabin crew, AKA the stewardesses, kept their heads and clearly avoided a panic. They kept people out of the water, which would have killed them in minutes from hypothermia and got them into rafts and on the wings (water was just barely above freezing at 32.5 degrees F, 0.3 C, air temperatures were in the 20s).

This whole crew, pilots AND flight attendants deserve praise and recognition. Remember this the next time you fly and are tempted to annoy a flight attendant. That lady or man may save your life as they did for the people here.

Thank God all these people are safe. I will fly with this flight crew anytime.

To the pilots of that airplane, first :tiphat:. Next, I am sure that (except for the Baptists, Mormons and JWs) the passengers and their families will be standing in line to buy you…

http://bestsmileys.com/drinks/4.gif

Um… how about “Thank you pilot for taking all those simulation trainings & other practices?”

Thank you God for giving the pilot the ability to land the plane with no loss of life. That includes the simulator training and competence to accomplish this miraculous feat.:slight_smile:

Wow… you just took away any credit the hardworking guy should have got… & attributed it to God for giving him the ability.

That’s actually fairly insulting, in my opinion.

If God can just do these things, why have people train/practise at all?
How is it God giving him ability, if he TRAINED for it for years?

Here’s a link to some info about that amazingly cool and competent pilot:

michellemalkin.com/2009/01/15/flight-1549-pilot-god-bless-chesley-sullenberger/

Lighten up Robert, I was just taking a little dig at you. Some people are so touchy. God bless you.:slight_smile:

          oh, by the way, God created him so God gave him the ability. God bless you again.

Great explanation, rpp!

And a mega attaboy to the pilot for some pretty good country flying. My understanding this afternoon was that the engines had eaten some geese; we’ll see what the NTSB investigation turns up.

And thanks, Lord. It’s nice to have some good news.

DaveBj

Not unless all that ability & other psy/motol function skills were inborn; which they were not.

My understanding this afternoon was that the engines had eaten some geese; we’ll see what the NTSB investigation turns up.

Haha!

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