Please Pray for Me


#1

If all you guys could send up a quick prayer for me I’d really appreciate it. I just got confirmed Catholic but I was raised Lutheran and I’m still coming to terms with the Eucharist. I want to believe in the Real Presence with all my heart but sometimes its real hard. Its like I walk up the communion line and I don’t feel like anything extraodinary is happening. I didn’t grow up believing in it so maybe that has something to do with it. I know modern-day miracles do occur, and that if Christ wants to effect the miracle of transubstantiation then of course He can do it, so I accept it intuitively. Its putting my heart into it that’s tough.


#2

Dear Collegekid

You will be in my prayers! I would suggest lots of prayer and regular attendance at Holy Hours where there is exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, obviously as well as going to Holy Mass. I would also recommend a wonderful book called “Come to me in the Blessed Sacrament” which is absolutely fantastic and I am sure it would help you alot as it has helped me. Here’s the link to that book:

catholicstore.com/browseproducts/Come-To-Me—In-The-Blessed-Sacrament.HTML


#3

you have described faith very well. “You have believed, Thomas, because you have seen. Blessed are those who have not seen, but yet believe.” Feelings are not an assurance of faith and are a very unreliable guide to faith. Simply get in the habit of saying, with Thomas, My Lord and My God and ask Jesus to come to you before every communion. Your faith will grow.


#4

Thank you, WILKM.

Part of my problem may be my lack of a complete understanding of the sacrament: do we take communion in memory of the last supper, or Christ’s crucifixion, or both? Correct me if I’m wrong, but before the last supper and the crucifixion Christ simply told us to partake of the sacrament because his body and blood are true food and true drink and we must do this if we want to have life within us. Was it his crucifixion which makes the sacrament complete?


#5

[quote=CollegeKid]Part of my problem may be my lack of a complete understanding of the sacrament: do we take communion in memory of the last supper, or Christ’s crucifixion, or both? Correct me if I’m wrong, but before the last supper and the crucifixion Christ simply told us to partake of the sacrament because his body and blood are true food and true drink and we must do this if we want to have life within us. Was it his crucifixion which makes the sacrament complete?
[/quote]

I asked a similar question and just recieved an answer. Since Christ is God and God is beyond time, Christ had the ability to offer up the sacrifice of Calvary before Calvary even historically took place. Without the crucifixion, the Eucharist would not have much meaning. Christ offered himself up to the Father, the priest offers up that perpetual sacrifice and we eat the risen paschal lamb.


#6

Psalm,

Thanks. That definitely helps me understand better.


#7

[quote=CollegeKid]Psalm,

Thanks. That definitely helps me understand better.
[/quote]

Also, the fact that you don’t sense anything with your conscious senses that the Real Presence has come, is not a problem and should not be construed as an alarm for you.

The mystery is beyond seeing and feeling – though I believe there have been some exceptions historically. As another poster mentioned, you have described faith very well. You believe it though you neither understand nor feel it. If you could do either of those, you wouldn’t need any faith to believe it, like Thomas!

Welcome to the forums, and to this beautiful Church. Climb aboard and take a seat among all of us sinners somewhere. The seas aren’t always smooth, but God will get His Church through any and all storms.

Alan


#8

Psalm (or anyone),

I need further clarification: when the priest offers up the bread and wine to be consecrated and we then eat it, God is conferring onto us the salvific effects of Christ’s crucifixion? One of the things I was struggling with is that it seemed a little incongruous as to how Christ dying for us on the cross translated to the need to partake of his body and blood, or how his earlier commandments to eat his body and blood had anything to do with the crucifixion. Is it simply because Christ told us to do it this way, to receive the saving effects of the crucifixion by participating in the eucharist?


#9

I’m really sorry because I’m basically just repeating myself, but I think this clarifies my understanding of the Eucharist, correct me if I’m wrong: the divinity of Christ and the saving effects of his crucifixion are contained in the bread and wine when they are changed into his body and blood, so this if why we take communion?


#10

Another help for you:

Through partaking of His Body and Blood, we become part of His Body on earth, doing what He would have us to do-- the Catholic Christian Community.


#11

[font=Arial]For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed. [/font]
[font=Arial]John 6:56[/font]
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[font=‘Trebuchet MS’]Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you. And behold I am with you all days, even to the consummation of the world. Matthew 28:20[/font]
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[font=Arial]God bless you collegeKid![/font]
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#12

[quote=CollegeKid]I’m really sorry because I’m basically just repeating myself, but I think this clarifies my understanding of the Eucharist, correct me if I’m wrong: the divinity of Christ and the saving effects of his crucifixion are contained in the bread and wine when they are changed into his body and blood, so this if why we take communion?
[/quote]

Here is a good article CollegeKid!
therealpresence.org/eucharst/realpres/eucheff.html


#13

While you do not ‘feel’ anything as you take communion, nonetheless, you are still receiving Christ Himself in that moment. It is not symbolic, it is real - even though it doesn’t ‘feel’ real (real flesh, real blood)…

I don’t know if it’s the official teaching of the church, but what I’ve noticed is that one will feel, if you take the time to notice…is the affect Christ within you has on your life…mostly it is very subtle, but sometimes it can be profound. You are no longer just ‘you’ when to leave the church…you now have Christ within you - truly, not just symbolically or in your mind only - and so as you drive away, encounter people throughout the rest of your day, go about your regular tasks and duties, everything you do takes on another element to it. It’s there, if you take the time to see it, to feel it. There is peace, courage, strength and conviction in everything you do because there is the confidence in knowing you are not encountering these things alone, but with Christ.

If you only attend mass on Sunday, and don’t pray regularlyor reflect upon Christ throughout the week, you’ll also notice it gets harder with each day to remain charitable, patient, kind, etc. Then Sunday rolls around, you go back to Mass…and by actively participating in the entire liturgy your spirit is rejuvenated - particularly after receiving Christ again through the Eucharist. It is why there are many Catholics who choose to attend Mass daily. The ability to receive the grace of God before you face your day of work/school/family is such a wonderful gift.

I hope this helps. Observe the little nuances of your day after you leave Mass…look for the signs of peace, comfort, tranquility in situations you otherwise would have been uneasy - that is the grace of God working inside you as a result of recieving Him in the Eucharist.


#14

Yinyangmom

Beautiful post and so true! Couldn’t agree with you more.


#15

[quote=CollegeKid]Psalm (or anyone),

I need further clarification: when the priest offers up the bread and wine to be consecrated and we then eat it, God is conferring onto us the salvific effects of Christ’s crucifixion? One of the things I was struggling with is that it seemed a little incongruous as to how Christ dying for us on the cross translated to the need to partake of his body and blood, or how his earlier commandments to eat his body and blood had anything to do with the crucifixion. Is it simply because Christ told us to do it this way, to receive the saving effects of the crucifixion by participating in the eucharist?
[/quote]

Great questions, and welcome to the forum.

I has similar doubts at one time, and still take care to make a conscious oath of faith in the Eucharist before receiving.

One thing that really helped me was understanding the Eucharist in relation to the New Covenant in Christ’s Blood, and how His sacrifice on Calvary is re-presented to us in the Mass. On the site linked below, choose “The Fourth Cup” to read a transcription of a speech by Scott Hahn, a well-respected theologian, on the Mass in relation to the Passover. It’s great!

netfiles.uiuc.edu/tomashek/www

Feel free to look at some of the other articles I’ve linked to, and PM me what you think.

The short of it (although you should still read it ;)) is that we look at the Mass as the New Passover, by which not only the Jewish people are saved, but all of humanity. If you look back to the Passover, not only were the Jews to sacrifice a pure, unblemished lamb (foreshadoing Christ) and spread it’s blood on the post and lintel of their doorway (aka, the cross), they were also required to partake, or eat of the sacrificial lamb. This ritual, performed in faithful obedience to God, is what bound them to the covenant which was their salvation. If they did not eat the passover meal following the sacrifice, they did not enter into the covenant and were not saved from the tenth plague.

The Mass is the New Passover (why do you think Jesus instituted the Mass on Passover?), where the truly perfect Lamb of God offered Himself as the sacrifice of the New Covenant, which He asked us to partake of regularly when He commanded “Do this in rememberance of Me”. It is through our reception of the Eucharistic Lord that we bind ourselves to the New Covenant and the family of God, and it is through that covenantal relationship with our Creator that we are saved. Every time we receive the Lord, we pledge ourselves anew to following the commands of the New Covenant, and subject ourselves to the sovereignty of God by the means He gave us to do that, the sacraments, especially the Eucharist.

Hope this helps – God’s plan is truly more beautiful and wonderous than we can comprehend! I pray for your faith – please pray for mine.

Peace,
javelin


#16

I started this thread a while back, and perhaps it would be of use for you now. It’s not very long, but it answers some of the questions you have (I think!):
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=58800

Please let me know if I can explain some of the imagery!

May God bless you and keep you,
RyanL

Mark 9:24 (New King James Version)

24Immediately the father of the child cried out and said with tears,** "Lord, I believe; help my unbelief!"

**


#17

CollegeKid -

In one of your posts you mention participating in the Crucifixion when receiving the Eucharist. That reminded me of a paper by Dr. Scott Hahn at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, Ohio, called “The Fourth Cup.” I’m not sure where to find the article, but the gist of it is that Christ completed the Jewish Passover ritual on the cross when He accepted the ‘drink’ offered to Him, then said “It is finished.” You can probably get a copy of the article by sending an email to Dr.Hahn. God bless you in your continuing growth in Catholicism!

MountainMan


#18

we’re praying for you, collegekid!


#19

[quote=CollegeKid]If all you guys could send up a quick prayer for me I’d really appreciate it. I just got confirmed Catholic but I was raised Lutheran and I’m still coming to terms with the Eucharist. I want to believe in the Real Presence with all my heart but sometimes its real hard. Its like I walk up the communion line and I don’t feel like anything extraodinary is happening. I didn’t grow up believing in it so maybe that has something to do with it.
[/quote]

The Lutheran Church (as well as some other Protestant denominations) does teach belief in the Real Presence. In the Lutheran Church it is called Consubstantiation.

God Bless


#20

[quote=Psalm45:9]I asked a similar question and just recieved an answer. Since Christ is God and God is beyond time, Christ had the ability to offer up the sacrifice of Calvary before Calvary even historically took place. Without the crucifixion, the Eucharist would not have much meaning. Christ offered himself up to the Father, the priest offers up that perpetual sacrifice and we eat the risen paschal lamb.
[/quote]

Shoot- I am a cradle Catholic and you just helped ME understand - or at least put into words - the whole presence and the reason for the Eucharist…thank you!


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