Plenary Indulgence on Divine Mercy Sunday


#1

Another forum member reminded me that this coming Sunday is Divine Mercy Sunday, upon which I might gain a plenary indulgence.

My question is, how do I know that I am not attached to any sin, even a venial sin? I can state that firmly with my mouth, but how do I really KNOW that I am not secretly desiring of some aspect of my sins? This seems like an impossible feat to me. I would LIKE to be unattached to sin; I STRIVE to be unattached to sin, but I fear that I am still attached to sin, since I keep on sinning.

Do I just fulfill the other aspects of the indulgence and trust that if I state out loud that I am unattached, that I am??

Mystified. I want to know how anyone gains this plenary indulgence. Help.


#2

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:1, topic:321627"]

Mystified. I want to know how anyone gains this plenary indulgence. Help.

[/quote]

As far as I know, all plenary indulgences have the condition that one have no attachment to sin. I don't think that we can know with certainty that we have no attachment to sin, but we fulfill all the rest of the conditions of the indulgence. God will judge and, if we have attachment to sin, we will only receive a partial indulgence. That is still a very good thing.

Here is a post by Fr. Z on the question:

Several people have written with a measure of dismay to ask how it is possible for us to obtain plenary indulgences. They assert that it is pretty much impossible because one of the conditions is that we must have no attachment to any sin, even venial sins. How, they wonder, can be be without any attachment to sins?

First, consider that Holy Church, in laying down this condition, nevertheless believes that you can, in fact, gain the indulgences! Holy Church, the greatest expert on humanity there has ever been, is confident that you can perform these works and also make an act of will against all sins, even venial sins. Holy Church would not offer something that it impossible to obtain.

We are members of a fallen race, susceptible to the problems that arise from the world, the flesh and the devil. We are always in a state of striving while in this world. We often fail, but we must always keep striving.

We can, in fact, habituate ourselves to making an act of will against all sins. We can do this!

Just as you habituate yourself to be grateful to God for all His gifts by praying before meals and after, just we we habituate ourselves with acts of the will to love God above all creaturely things by making acts of faith, hope and love during the day, just as we habituate ourselves to check our actions and words carefully by making a daily examination of conscience, we can also habituate ourselves truly to hate sins and desire not to commit them. We can have the intention, the desire, not to sin even when realistically we know that we are still poor sinners in need of graces and mercy.

Before performing an indulgenced work make an act of will against all sins and ask God to take away all attachment for any sins you might habitually or even infrequently commit, moral or venial.

People habituate themselves and organize their time around all sorts of worldly pursuits. They will move heaven and earth to be able to park themselves in front of a television for a sports event on a certain date. They will make plans to go to the opening of a new movie. If we do these things, which are passing and ephemeral, can we not be even more dedicated to watching for opportunities for gaining indulgences? Think of the benefit. We have pleasure from watching a ballgame and we prepare around the event. But by plenary and partial indulgences we help souls in purgatory who, in turn, will be grateful for our help and will pray for us before God’s throne when they enter into the happiness of heaven, perhaps in part because of YOUR prayer!

As Catholics, it should be part of our identity and regular practice to avail ourselves of the great treasure Holy Church offers from the merits of the Sacrfice of the Lord and of the saints. We should, as a normal part of our lives, develop the habit of seeking indulgences. Therefore, we should keep close track of the liturgical calendar. Priests should announce opportunities for indulgences during announcements at Mass and in the bulletin. We should help each other gain them, for example by going together with people to a church on its patronal feast or to a cemetery during November, etc.

This is what Catholics do.

It is all about developing habits. This can take some time, but the rewards are far more than the effort we spend on them.

You can indeed make an act of will to detest sins and desire not to commit them. You can do this. It takes some practice, so that it becomes easier, but … you should be doing that anyway, indulgences in view or not.

wdtprs.com/blog/2011/10/quaeritur-attachment-to-sin-indulgences-and-you/


#3

Great question. Going to confession? I will see if my scripture want-to-be hubby can find something and post back. Thanks for your original post.


#4

[quote="floresco, post:2, topic:321627"]
As far as I know, all plenary indulgences have the condition that one have no attachment to sin. I don't think that we can know with certainty that we have no attachment to sin, but we fulfill all the rest of the conditions of the indulgence. God will judge and, if we have attachment to sin, we will only receive a partial indulgence. That is still a very good thing.

Here is a post by Fr. Z on the question: wdtprs.com/blog/2011/10/quaeritur-attachment-to-sin-indulgences-and-you/

[/quote]

Thank you, that's a great article! I bookmarked it and will keep it nearby as I attempt this indulgence.


#5

[quote="90Domer, post:3, topic:321627"]
Great question. Going to confession? I will see if my scripture want-to-be hubby can find something and post back. Thanks for your original post.

[/quote]

Do you mean that when I go to confession, I should be clear of attachment to sin? Theoretically, that is the intent. And I am absolved from the sins I've committed, but what about sins I still habitually commit almost without noticing them? Do I truly despise them? Or do I give mere lip service to hating my sins?

I need to spend some time in adoration before Sunday.


#6

I'm not sure where I read it, or who said it, but I read something by a Saint that said that most people are never free of attachment to sin and that people usually end up only getting partial indulgences when they try for plenary indulgences.

However, even a partial indulgence is pretty good, and you can obtain those up pretty easily if you go to confession and communion about every 2 weeks.


#7

[quote="thomasf, post:6, topic:321627"]
I'm not sure where I read it, or who said it, but I read something by a Saint that said that most people are never free of attachment to sin and that people usually end up only getting partial indulgences when they try for plenary indulgences.

However, even a partial indulgence is pretty good, and you can obtain those up pretty easily if you go to confession and communion about every 2 weeks.

[/quote]

As I understand it, partials are achieved by making a good confession, receiving the Eucharist, and praying for the intentions of the Pope. Is that right?

I will attempt the plenary, though. I get an image of a diver making a high dive and waiting for the scores to show up...:) except that I won't know the scores in this life.


#8

Please don't forget, too, that one must say the Divine Mercy Novena along with the Divine Mercy Chaplet for each of the the nine days for the plenary indulgence. In addition to going to confession on the Saturday before Divine Mercy Sunday, too. :thumbsup:

+JMJ+


#9

[quote="jmj777, post:8, topic:321627"]
Please don't forget, too, that one must say the Divine Mercy Novena along with the Divine Mercy Chaplet for each of the the nine days for the plenary indulgence. In addition to going to confession on the Saturday before Divine Mercy Sunday, too. :thumbsup:

+JMJ+

[/quote]

Now, wait just a red-hot minute - I didn't hear that was necessary! :confused:

*The plenary indulgence is granted (under the usual conditions of a sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion and a prayer for the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on Divine Mercy Sunday, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, recite the Our Father and the Creed, and also adding a devout prayer (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!).
*

divinemercysunday.com/plenary_indulgence.htm


#10

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:9, topic:321627"]
Now, wait just a red-hot minute - I didn't hear that was necessary! :confused:

The plenary indulgence is granted (under the usual conditions of a sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion and a prayer for the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on Divine Mercy Sunday, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, recite the Our Father and the Creed, and also adding a devout prayer (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!).

[/quote]

You are correct, Juliane. The indulgence is not dependent upon performing the novena, but is Our Lord's wish to sanctify His faithful on this special Feast, removing all stain of sins from their souls.

Regarding the attachment to sin, you will be encouraged by this post that explains the Church's position on this.

[size=3]We may treat the more "lenient" view as common teaching since the Church clearly intends to grant plenary indulgences that can be obtained by the faithful every day.
It would not seem reasonable to do this if it were almost impossible to gain them in practice

.

We may therefore encourage people to carry out the works prescribed for the gaining of a plenary indulgence (including, for many, a return to the sacrament of confession) without discouraging them by the rigorist opinion that a plenary indulgence can scarcely ever be gained in fact. [/size]


#11

Not that there is anything WRONG with saying the Novena…I didn’t mean to imply that…Just that it’s going to be difficult enough for me to fulfill just the regular stuff without going into a 9 day prayer.


#12

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:11, topic:321627"]
Not that there is anything WRONG with saying the Novena...I didn't mean to imply that...Just that it's going to be difficult enough for me to fulfill just the regular stuff without going into a 9 day prayer.

[/quote]

I understand. I mentioned this since the novena is just about over. If you had a misconception that your plenary would not count, therefore, I wanted to let you know that it does. It is a most special grant by our church for this holy feast day, since it was Our Lord's wish specifically directed by Him to St. Faustina. If you did not pray the novena that started Good Friday, you are still able to gain the plenary.


#13

Here is a link to an article I read recently on this matter: taylormarshall.com/2013/04/why-divine-mercy-sunday-is-better-than.html.

Now, I'm quite confused. The article says Christ does not require detachment from all sin for attaining the special grace of Divine Mercy Sunday.

Another question: If one is in the state of sin and he is not able to go to confession but he makes a perfect act of contrition (resolving to go to confession afterwards), may he receive communion? If he can,does this satisfy the condition for the indulgence?


#14

[quote="browebmaster, post:13, topic:321627"]
Here is a link to an article I read recently on this matter: taylormarshall.com/2013/04/why-divine-mercy-sunday-is-better-than.html.

Now, I'm quite confused. The article says Christ does not require detachment from all sin for attaining the special grace of Divine Mercy Sunday.

Another question: If one is in the state of sin and he is not able to go to confession but he makes a perfect act of contrition (resolving to go to confession afterwards), may he receive communion? If he can,does this satisfy the condition for the indulgence?

[/quote]

I was not able to view the link, since I had a message that there was a problem with the script. My advice would be that it is the Church that gives the grant of indulgence, and therefore the Church alone gives the guidelines for receiving the plenary. I would not trust this author's opinion, since Christ told us to listen to the Church. Do not attempt to go to communion on a "perfect contrition" if you are in mortal sin.

Usually, we have 20 days before or after performance of the act that receives the grant of indulgence, but in this case, Jesus said we must receive communion on the Feast of Divine Mercy. It may not apply in this instance, since you have not been to confession.

You may obtain a plenary indulgence in other ways many times through the year simply by performing the act within the time allowed. There are many ways to obtain the indulgence, so you haven't missed an opportunity if you fail to receive it on this feast day. Probably the easiest way ever to receive a plenary was when Pope Francis blessed us on his inaugural mass and again on Easter. He granted it even to those who were watching his mass on television.


#15

[quote="Sirach2, post:14, topic:321627"]
I was not able to view the link, since I had a message that there was a problem with the script. My advice would be that it is the Church that gives the grant of indulgence, and therefore the Church alone gives the guidelines for receiving the plenary. I would not trust this author's opinion, since Christ told us to listen to the Church. Do not attempt to go to communion on a "perfect contrition" if you are in mortal sin.

Usually, we have 20 days before or after performance of the act that receives the grant of indulgence, but in this case, Jesus said we must receive communion on the Feast of Divine Mercy. It may not apply in this instance, since you have not been to confession.

You may obtain a plenary indulgence in other ways many times through the year simply by performing the act within the time allowed. There are many ways to obtain the indulgence, so you haven't missed an opportunity if you fail to receive it on this feast day. Probably the easiest way ever to receive a plenary was when Pope Francis blessed us on his inaugural mass and again on Easter. He granted it even to those who were watching his mass on television.

[/quote]

Does going to the Saturday vigil count or do I need to go back tomorrow?


#16

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:1, topic:321627"]
I would LIKE to be unattached to sin; I STRIVE to be unattached to sin, but I fear that I am still attached to sin, since I keep on sinning.

Do I just fulfill the other aspects of the indulgence and trust that if I state out loud that I am unattached, that I am??

Mystified. I want to know how anyone gains this plenary indulgence. Help.

[/quote]

I have read an explanation of this on a priest's blog. (I think it was Fr. Z of WDTPRS).
Basically, we can never know for sure if we are attached to sin, only God knows. We go with the best possible intention of not being attached. Even if we don't get a plenary indulgence, ithe indulgence can still be obtained to a some degree. Nothing ever goes to waste.


#17

The vigil mass is the mass of Sunday; i.e., Divine Mercy. I believe so, because I went tonight also. There is a nearby parish that has a holy hour tomorrow at 3 PM for Divine Mercy that includes benediction and recitation of the Chaplet. I’m very happy that at least one parish in my area has offered this. There was not even a mention of Divine Mercy by my pastor, not even in the bulletin. :frowning:


#18

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:1, topic:321627"]
Another forum member reminded me that this coming Sunday is Divine Mercy Sunday, upon which I might gain a plenary indulgence.

My question is, how do I know that I am not attached to any sin, even a venial sin? I can state that firmly with my mouth, but how do I really KNOW that I am not secretly desiring of some aspect of my sins? This seems like an impossible feat to me. I would LIKE to be unattached to sin; I STRIVE to be unattached to sin, but I fear that I am still attached to sin, since I keep on sinning.

Do I just fulfill the other aspects of the indulgence and trust that if I state out loud that I am unattached, that I am??

Mystified. I want to know how anyone gains this plenary indulgence. Help.

[/quote]

Detachment is indicated in that you regret even having done the sin and intend not to repeat it again. You are not considering continuing in the mortal or venial sins you confessed.

Even if not perfect it will default to partial, which is significant, expecially since the church doubles it. From Pope Paul VI: Indulgentiarium Doctrina (1967):
Regarding partial indulgences, with the abolishment of the formerdetermination of days and years, a new norm or measurement has beenestablished which takes into consideration the action itself of thefaithful Christian who performs a work to which an indulgence is attached.
Since by their acts the faithful can obtain, in addition to the meritwhich is the principal fruit of the act, a further remission of temporalpunishment in proportion to the degree to which the charity of the oneperforming the act is greater, and in proportion to the degree to whichthe act itself is performed in a more perfect way, it has been consideredfitting that this remission of temporal punishment which the Christianfaithful acquire through an action should serve as the measurement forthe remission of punishment which the ecclesiastical authoritybountifully adds by way of partial indulgence.

 It has also been considered fitting to reduce appropriately the number ofplenary     indulgences in order that the faithful may hold them in greateresteem and may in     fact acquire them with the proper dispositions. Forindeed the greater the     proliferation (of indulgences) the less is theattention given them; what is     offered in abundance is not greatlyappreciated. Besides, many of the faithful need     considerable time toprepare themselves properly for acquisition of a plenary     indulgence.

ewtn.com/library/PAPALDOC/P6INDULG.HTM


#19

[quote="Sirach2, post:17, topic:321627"]
The vigil mass is the mass of Sunday; i.e., Divine Mercy. I believe so, because I went tonight also. There is a nearby parish that has a holy hour tomorrow at 3 PM for Divine Mercy that includes benediction and recitation of the Chaplet. I'm very happy that at least one parish in my area has offered this. There was not even a mention of Divine Mercy by my pastor, not even in the bulletin. :(

[/quote]

That's always sad. :( I may go tomorrow anyway. Can't hurt, right?

:)


#20

On Divine Mercy Sunday there are 2 different things going on that day.

The first is the promise made by Christ to St Faustina of the complete forgiveness of sins. To do that, one must go to confession and receive communion on Divine Mercy Sunday. Also complete an act of mercy. And I do believe one is supposed to venerate the image of the Divine Mercy as well. Read more about the promise here:
secure.marianweb.net/thedivinemercy.org/celebrate/greatgrace/graces.php

There is also the plenary indulgence granted by the church that day. Pope JPII granted that indulgence when he declared the day a feast. The usual conditions for indulgences apply. Confession, communion, prayer for the Pope's intentions, detachment from sin. Read more about that here:

divinemercysunday.com/plenary_indulgence.htm
vatican.va/roman_curia/tribunals/apost_penit/documents/rc_trib_appen_doc_20020629_decree-ii_en.html

So you can get the plenary indulgence that day, and also Christ promised a remission from sin that day as well. As I posted in another thread, one could gain the indulgence, offer it for a soul in purgatory as an act of mercy, and qualify for the promise that Christ made. And that way, place trust in Jesus as he requested. Just a thought.


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