Pointed Questions for Door-to-Door Missionaries


#1

Not sure if this thread should be here or non-Catholic religions. :o

Often times in reading about the experience of experienced apologists, they’ll recount tales of talking to door-to-door non-Catholic missionaries. I notice that they seem to have a knack for asking pointed questions that cut through all the smoke and make the missionary stop and think.

Whenever I read these stories, I think to myself, “Boy, I never would have thought to ask that questions.” It seems to me that, no matter how much knowledge you have of the faith, there are more effective and less effective ways to actually convey it. This has always been a difficulty for me, especially when faced with situations where you have to think quickly on your feet.

So my question is, are there any simple pointed questions you have either used yourself or heard other people use that cut through the smoke to allow the light of truth to penetrate?

Of course, I realize that it is the Holy Spirit who ultimately converts and we can’t “argue” people into the faith. I also realize that differing situations would likely necessitate different questions (i.e. you would speak differently to a Mormon than to a fundamentalist). But I think there are good and not-so-good questions to pose to door-to-door missionaries, some of which might be more or less universal.

Any suggestions would be helpful! Thanks!


#2

Kindly explain that you too, are a Christian and point him/her to the neighbor, wish him blessing and tell him to keep the good fight for the Gospel is to be spread to all corners of the earth!


#3

My pointed question would be “If I believe in Christ and trust in him for my salvation, why shouldn’t I remain Catholic? How will my being Catholic prevent me from getting to heaven?”


#4

In my experience, you have to start by asking basic, non-threatening questions that give *you *information about them and force them to think. Questions like:

**“That’s an interesting statement–why do you think that?”

“What makes you say that?”**

In addition to giving you time to think, if you’ve done your apologetics homework these simple questions will call to mind responses and defenses.

**“That’s not what I believe. I would put it like this, and this is why…” **

The trouble with most of us is we’re too nice. We don’t want to interrupt anyone or contradict them for fear of being rude. The worst thing you can do is let them lead you around by the nose. By asking questions, you are the one controlling the conversation and putting them on the defensive.


#5

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=179131

…if you can contribute more such questions to the thread, please do so!!!


#6

Thanks for the link to the previous thread. That will keep me busy for a while! :slight_smile:


#7

The number one thing to keep in mind is that Catholics believe Jesus established a Church that has SURVIVED the ages. The Gospel was NEVER lost. (Passages that come to mind, Mat 16:18; Mat 28:20; 1 Tim 3:15, Jude 1:3)

Groups like LDS and JWs are founded on the principle the Gospel was lost somewhere “along the way” and that their prophets recovered it. And by “along the way” they mean the time starting from after the apostles died UP TO the mid 1800s when the LDS and JWs came on the scene. :eek:

Tell them if Jesus couldnt preserve the Gospel then that is failure on His part…but we all know Jesus doesnt fail.


#8

I tend to find that asking, “Hi, would you like to come in and see my collection of sacrificial crucifixies” stops most people in their tracks…:smiley:

Seriously though, I’m normally just polite, commend them for their faith, and ask them if there is anything they would like to pray for…:slight_smile:


#9

I usually tell them, “No, I’m not interested, but before you go, let’s pray together.” I step outside on the porch and pray that God will bring us all closer to Himself and then conclude with something like “In the Name of Jesus, God the Son, Second Person of the Trinity, God of God, eternally God forevermore, we pray. Amen.”

They then leave. :slight_smile:


#10

If we look at the history of the Church, the continuity is amazing. If the Catholic Church was not the true Church, I don’t see how the continuity could have remained across the “dark ages” from 600-1100. All of the other “churches” barely maintain continuity from year to year.


#11

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