Police turn their back on de Blasio


#1

New York Post
By Shawn Cohen, Kirstan Conley and Amber Jamieson
December 20, 2014 | 10:34pm

A blue wall of silently seething police officers turned their backs on Mayor de Blasio Saturday night — literally.

As the mayor and his entourage snaked through a jammed third-floor corridor at Woodhull Hospital, where two officers had been pronounced dead just hours earlier, scores of grieving cops faced the walls — and away from the leader they believe has failed them.

Earlier, de Blasio approached a cluster of cops at the Brooklyn Hospital and offered, “We’re all in this together.”

“No we’re not,” an officer replied tersely, according to a cop who witnessed the icy scene.

(Read more)


#2

Let’s see, they are mad because he said his son should be wary of police. Well, I don’t know about New York, but here is some of the hilarity coming out of the Cleveland Police Dept.

cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2014/12/cleveland_police_union_defends.html

where a Cleveland police officer managed to avoid losing his job for being in a drunken bar fight where he lost his weapon and badge because there has been worse done without losing the job including

  • one officer pulled his wife out of her car and fired off eight shots into it because he did not want her to get the car in a divorce settlement;
  • another got drunk and threatened his girlfriend with a shotgun;
  • another officer shot his gun “in a threatening manner” while intoxicated;
  • an officer pulled his gun during a drunken wedding fight;
  • a female officer smeared animal feces on her own apartment walls during a rent dispute, and told her landlord to pick her keys up at the department’s gun range;
  • another officer fled the scene of an accident after he hit a man on a motorcycle.

Now, it seems like if police want people to not be scared of them, then they have to work to rout out the bad cops instead of hiding behind the blue line of silence.


#3

What does Cleveland have to do with the NYC police? Are you saying that police are all the same? As far as being scared of the police the reason why I’m not scared of them is because I try to obey the law. And if they stop me I don’t try to fight with them or give them an attitude. For example, I was stopped twice by the police recently in my neighborhood. The first time was when I was waiting to pick up my older daughter from the bus stop. They asked to see my ID. So I showed it to them. Then I took her home and then drove back to wait at the bus stop for my younger daughter. As soon as I parked, a different police officer asked me for my ID because he didn’t know that another had just asked me. But rather than getting hostile and showing attitude, I showed him my ID. That’s how I avoided going to jail or getting killed by the police. Even though I was inconvenienced I was glad that they were doing their job in looking after the neighborhood. And the first couple of times in my life that I’ve ever been stopped was by a black police officer.


#4

I said I don’t know about the New York police, but I think there are probably common elements of big city police departments. If you want, here’s what a former NY police officer had to say:

nydailynews.com/new-york/serpico-wedge-driven-police-society-article-1.2034651

“But today, we have cops crying wolf all the time. They testify “I was in fear of my life,” the grand jury buys it, the DA winks and nods, and there’s no indictment.” - Frank Serpico.

As far as not being scared of cops because you obey the law, then I give you Tamir Rice.


#5

Emergency workers killed in the September 11 attacks

341 firefighters and 2 paramedics from the New York City Fire Department (FDNY);[1]
37 police officers from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department (PAPD);[2]
23 police officers from the New York City Police Department (NYPD);[3] and
8 emergency medical technicians and paramedics from private hospital units dispatched through the 911 system, as well as commercial ambulance groups brought in under "mutual aid" for this disaster emergency medical services.[4][5]
3 New York State Court Officers[6]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emergency_workers_killed_in_the_September_11_attacks


#6

It is funny how when criminal acts are reported about real criminals everything is prefixed with ‘alledged’ but when its the cops whoa re accused, well that is just proven fact, no need for footnoting anything.


#7

The outrage over police abuse of power is similar to the outrage over a school teacher molesting a child, or a military squad engaging in a massacre, a banker embezzling, and so on…

One of the rules of society is that with power comes responsibility. This is true for anyone who has the legal right to make decisions which affect another person. Unfortunately, those who are in positions of power sometimes forget this truth, and they sometimes even cover up each others’ abrogation of duty.

Priests who molested children were protected by the people who should have disciplined them. Military personnel who engaged in illegal killing were protected by those who should have prosecuted them. Police who break the law are often protected by their peers and by prosecutors. Physicians who engage in malpractice are protected by their peers, who should be forcing them out of medicine. I imagine a psychologist can tell you why this is. But as a society, we expect a higher standard of conduct from those in such positions then we might from others.


#8

And yet, just like common criminals, the police have the PRESUMPTION of INNOCENCE till proven guilty.

That is one point I was making you seemed to have missed, and the other is that there are those who are too quick to defend criminals that are obviously guilty, who cant see who Brown was guilty of anything for example, but jump like a bug to damn the police reflexively.


#9

None of the below examples show abuse of power, just everyday human stupidity.

  • police officer (was) in a drunken bar fight where he lost his weapon and badge
  • one officer pulled his wife out of her car and fired off eight shots into it because he did not want her to get the car in a divorce settlement;
  • another got drunk and threatened his girlfriend with a shotgun;
  • another officer shot his gun “in a threatening manner” while intoxicated;
  • an officer pulled his gun during a drunken wedding fight;
  • a female officer smeared animal feces on her own apartment walls during a rent dispute, and told her landlord to pick her keys up at the department’s gun range;
  • another officer fled the scene of an accident after he hit a man on a motorcycle.

#10

It’s very likely that all these cases are abuses of power. After all, they are police officers and I would submit that a) the people they threatened knew they were police officers and b) they thought they could get away with it because they are police officers. That sounds like an abuse of power to me.


#11

Except Mayor Di Blasio did not condemn the police. He just said that he told his son about the ‘dangers’ some police pose. Now, the police are turning their backs on him and accusing him of being responsible for these murders, which is ridiculous.


#12

The other side of the story is that these are individuals who put their lives on the line frequently in service to their fellow men. Nothing worse than feeling betrayed by the very ones who you risk your life trying to defend. If no one has your back why would you bother to risk your life protecting those who show no appreciation for what you are doing?

My guess is that morale among officers in big cities across the US is at an all time low. We are not going to raise that, nor form better departments by nit-picking instances of poor judgement caused, very likely, by increasing stress.

Look at the state of the US military. Morale has dropped to frightening levels. It will happen with police departments, as well.

Taking the side of perpetrators or portraying them as victims isn’t helpful. Second guessing grand jury findings doesn’t help build confidence among officers because even if they are found innocent, their actions will always be questioned. Why would anyone place themselves in such a precarious position that may cost them their life or end them up in prison because no matter what they do there will be a presumption of guilt.

There is a dysfunctional dis-ease running through modern western society. We seem more preoccupied with finding guilt and scapegoating than truly diagnosing the source of the problem. I suggest the problem stems from rampant egoism, individualism and unfettered libertarianism. It will only get worse until we wake up from the delusion.


#13

No, he’s not responsible. But…
He made a statement that is anti-police, so they turned their backs. I agree with them.


#14

How is the Mayor telling his son about the dangers some police pose different than police officers telling their sons about the dangers some black people pose? Are you ok with both scenarios?


#15

No. I don’t have a problem with that at all.


#16

I consider it turning your back on your boss and the people you are supposed to serve. But, they can’t be fired, so I guess all is good.


#17

But the point is that a boss isn’t supposed to turn HIS back on his people. Many feel DiBlasio did just that.


#18

Not really seeing it that way. What he said was relatively benign, but,it seems like it is giving some of the police and their unions a chance to blame him and others for the fact that a large portion of the public lacks faith in them.

Of course, a better way to handle it would to be able to fire the bad cops, but, as we see in Cleveland, you can shoot up your ex-wife’s car and not lose your job.


#19

He’s getting what he gave.


#20

What did he give?


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.