Polls: Support for Obamacare at all-time high


#1

(CNN)Support for Obamacare is at an all-time high, according to two surveys released this week as Republican leaders continue to press the case for repeal amid fierce resistance at many town halls.

The latest Health Tracking Poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that 48% of Americans view the law favorably, compared to 42% who have an unfavorable view. This is the highest level of favorability measured in more than 60 Kaiser Health Tracking Polls conducted since 2010.

The boost comes largely from independents, half of whom view Obamacare favorably compared to just 39% who don’t. Nearly three-quarters of Democrats continue to view it favorably, while about the same share of Republicans have an unfavorable view.

Also, a survey from the Pew Research Center found 54% of Americans approve of the Affordable Care Act – the highest level ever recorded by Pew – while 43% disapprove. That’s up from an even split (48%-47%) in a Pew survey from December, suggesting support for the law may be galvanized by the ongoing public fight over its future.

Predictably, Republicans are most likely to say they disapprove (89%) while Democrats are most likely to express approval (85%). But more independents say they approve (53%) than disapprove (45%) – up about 10 points from December.

The Pew survey results also found that even among those who disapprove of the law, 25% want GOP leaders to “make modifications” while just 17% want to “get rid of the law entirely.”

The Kaiser survey also asked respondents about their views on Medicaid, which was broadened under Obamacare to cover low-income adults.

Some 84% of those polled say it is either “very” or “somewhat” important for any replacement plan to ensure that states that received federal funds to expand Medicaid continue to receive those funds. This includes majorities of Democrats (95%), independents (84%) and Republicans (69%).

Two-thirds of respondents say they don’t support turning Medicaid into a grant program, where the federal government would send a fixed amount of funding to the states but give them more control over who and what is covered. They prefer the status quo, they said.

cnn.com/2017/02/24/politics/pew-survey-obamacare-support-record-high/index.html


#2

Trump ran on a platform of repealing and replacing ObamaCare. Didn’t Hillary Clinton run on a platform of preserving ObamaCare? Trump won the election. ObamaCare is going to get repealed and replaced.


#3

More than just Obamacare was part of the election. Including the propensity of Americans to ebb and flow and a few states being decided by 1% to determine the EC. And the election was in Nov. This is Feb as indicated by the 10 pt change among independents since Dec that was cited in the polling.


#4

We never appreciate what we have as much as when we are about to lose it. I believe the support for Obama is also at an all-time high.


#5

Polls can be manipulated to give the result that one wants. It may take no consideration of those young populace who may not want it.


#6

It my neck of the woods the young populace tell us that it’s cheaper to pay the penalty for not having health insurance that paying the premiums for Obamacare. Thus, sadly it’s a nightmare for actuaries because having the usually healthier younger people in the pool and paying full premiums helps pay medical expenses for those that are older or have more medical expenses.

Mary.


#7

this makes no sense. Obamacare was unfavorable and unwelcome from the beginning. Now all of a sudden it is popular? More leftist rubbish. All of a sudden there are commercials on tv about how wonderful Obamacare is. Come on! You can’t be that naive to what is happening. Another way to undermine Trump. The shadow government at work.


#8

After being dropped by insurance companies the past few years, along with the large price increases, and news of different hospitals no longer taking patients with exchange ACA insurance, I gave up on Obamacare.

I ended up signing up with a Christian Healthcare Sharing plan. it is except from the ACA penalty, doesn’t turn away those with pre-existing conditions, costs are less and one is to live a Christian life. I find it to be a better program in my opinion.


#9

I did a gallup poll once. They are unstrustworthy. They asked if I was “Roman” Catholic. Shudders (I hate the term). Anyway, when I made a little aside about why I hold the views I do the girl on the line was like “I don’t have to know why”. I’m sorry, but if you want the reason WHY things are like that I have to tell you WHY I have my views in the first place. That’s not very scientific otherwise. Asking people their opinion is important, but failing to ask why renders the whole point moot.


#10

I’m not fan of Trump (Nor was I of Obama), nor am I against having government healthcare (although I think it should be under more direct control of local governments). But I am inclined to agree. It seems like when Obama was president, everyone was afraid to say anything negative about him. Now that Trump is president, it’s open season. Obamacare was a failure from the start. Our country had never had anything like that before (I am American), had no one to implement it, and made people who had religious objections to some of what it paid for, pay for it. I always thought that odd, given that Amish people don’t pay social security because they don’t use it (contrary to persistent myth, they DO pay taxes). Anyway, Eden foods (a health food organisation) is what made me against it. The big boss there said women can get abortions and contraceptives, but he doesn’t have to pay for it. I had a Facebook a few years ago, and the Facebook page was full of vitriol from people that were angry (mainly women) that this man wouldn’t pay for abortions and contraceptives. Okay, why should a CEO of a health food company pay for you to pump your body full of hormones? Isn’t that kind of the antithesis to WHY you buy that food to begin with? It seemed so stupid and so out of place. I understand people are passionate about their views, but it seemed so bizarre to me. So hormones in food are bad but in pills good? Anyway, these are my main problems with Obamacare. I am sure president Obama has some redeeming traits, just as I am sure President Trump does, but sometimes, it’s hard to see politicians in that light. Pray for them, if nothing else.


#11

The claim was about popularity. Hillary, supporting Obamacare, did get more votes.


#12

Good Lord. What world are you living in?


#13

Pew Research has a good reputation for conducting polls scientifically. If you disregard their polls you will have to disregard all polls.


#14

ACA (“Obamacare”) requires insurance carriers to cover 10 key items, including maternity care.

If Trump wants to be a “pro-life” president, he can’t kick those unborn (and to-be born) babies’ mommies off maternity leave coverage.

That’s not “pro-life.” :tsktsk:


#15

Wonder how come those ACA supporters don’t see that it is imploding. IMO that was the objective all along.


#16

I completely understand why the person doing the poll said they didn’t need to know why, but I would agree that they want to know why.

My company started doing employee engagement surveys about 10 years ago. At first it was say 20 questions about things like “are we headed in the right direction” or “do you have confidence in you manager”. All well and good, but it is onpy data that provides no insight. After 3 years of asking those questions without asking they were frustrated that scores weren’t changing. They finally started asking why people rated things one way or another and low and behold they found that the same response could have very different drivers. Twon people could say they strongly disagreed with where the company was headed, but one might think it was because of making poor financial choices where another might say it was because we weren’t involved more in the community. Two very different things.

The problem I have is not with polls in of themselves, but rather in the analysis and reporting. Generally people are hearing 3 or 4 data points from the media that are drawn from a report done by a polling org with maybe 15-20 points of analysis. So people hear what the reporter thought was insightful based on what the polling org presented, but it is a filtered view of a filtered analysis. I would put more stock in the polls if the orgs gave access to the raw data so that others could slice and dice the data. Having worked with other data analysts, sometimes someone from a different perspective can provide additional insight that you might be prebiased against.

Personally, this tells me that perhaps attitudes have changed, but it does nothing to say if it is a long term shift or what drives the shift. I think most people actually have no problem with certain provisions in ACA, but one person could say they mostly approve because of 5% they find good whereas someone else could like the same 5% but mostly disapprove because of the 95% they find troublesome.


#17

You got it! :thumbsup:


#18

Precisely. Left to its own, Obamacare will implode. Keeping cost down, according to the chief architect of Obamacare caught on video, was never the intention. It was all just another entitlement program for the “poor” paid for by the working class of America.


#19

But is there not a working poor who also have benefited from Obamacare since they did not previously have health care coverage from their employee, and some of whom voted for Trump for other reasons? What conservatives often call identity politics, in this case based more on class than race, is not necessarily present here.


#20

Maybe the reality of having to pay $100,000 for surgeries has finally been realized, Trump or no Trump.

Wait till the issues of dismantling Social Security and Medicare come up. What were Republican voters thinking?


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