Polygamy website for British Muslims touts skyrocketing growth, 100K membership


#1

The founder of a polygamy website for British Muslims has released a press release touting its quick rise to 100,000 members.

m.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/aug/25/polygamy-website-for-british-muslims-touts-skyrock/


#2

Oh, man… the Islamization of Europe has taken hold. The next thing you know, they’ll be outbreeding the native Britons. (Muslims in France already have an 8.1 fertility rate per family, while the French only have like a 1.8 fertility rate). :frowning:


#3

I presume Azad Chaiwala is is a Muslim. It’s interesting that a Muslim is using the fact that same-sex marriage has been legalised in various countries as an point/argument that polygamists should have “same rights”.


#4

Muslims are increasing all over the world, not just in Europe. In our neighborhood, the Muslim family has a lot of children, whereas most Roman Catholic families at the local church seem to be small. According to polls that I have read, many Roman Catholic married couples use artificial birth control, even though for Roman Catholics it is materially a grave sin to do so. Also, Muslims pray five times every day, but I have not met a Roman Catholic lay person who prays five rosaries every day. How many Roman Catholic lay people do you know who pray five rosaries every day? Polls show that about 63%of Muslims pray five times every day.


#5

The comparison between a Muslim performing Salaat five times a day and a Catholic praying the rosary is not quite the best one. Perhaps it would be better to compare Salaat and Fixed Hour Prayer or Liturgy of the Hours. Each is a set prayer (or prayers) at a specific time of day.

I don’t know how many Catholics (outside of monastic houses) pray the Hours, but I would think not a lot. There certainly are breviaries that are compiled for the laity, and many want to take on that discipline, but it is not easy.

Muslims are quite disciplined spiritually to keep the Hours. They are a good example for those of us who are not so disciplined (like me).


#6

Yes, it is admirable. I believe the Liturgy of the Hours (five times of prayer) is an extension of Jewish practice during the Babylonian exile, when they were separated from the Temple and “synagogues” became places of instruction and communal prayer. Likewise, I learned somewhere that the Muslim prayer five times a day is a take-off from the Liturgy of the Hours. It was a “Eureka!” moment in my Intro to Judaism class, when the Rabbi talked about the five times of prayers.


#7

Yes, exactly! It’s a shame that Christianity has forgotten what praying the Hours is all about, or that we have left it to the monastics to do. Judaism, too, for that matter. We all are related in prayer…

But this is a bit of a sidetrack from the growing demographics worldwide. Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world, and it makes sense that they would want to carry their traditions and customs with them when they emigrate. The problem is when conflicts arise with the existing culture. But that has been the case from time immemorial, hasn’t it?


#8

Some of the conflicts are real. For example, if a woman completely covers her face, how will she be identified in class while taking an exam? Other conflicts are totally made up and not really conflicts at all, but just issues brought up for no good reason except to create unnecessary controversy. For example, why should anyone care if a Muslim woman wants to wear a scarf covering her head, or if she wants to dress modestly while on the beach?


#9


#10

I laughed! :slight_smile:

Also, I don’t think we can blame immigration and high birth rates. Why Islam is so compelling to some people as opposed to the freedom and security in culture that so many other religions offer (seriously, look at Hinduism or Jainism and compare), I wouldn’t know.

Converts:


closed #11

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.