Polygamy?


#1

I was watching a news special about a man(who i believe was mormon; please correct me if i’m wrong) who had four wives. How could a so called christian be married to more than one women; how can you fully love four wives at the same time. Not to meantion the conflict between the family. But then I remembered reading about how King David, Abraham, Jacob, Solomon all practiced polygyny:confused: . Is polygyny allowed in the RCC? To me this seems to diffiicult to believe. How many of you believe this should be accepted?


#2

polygamy isn’t acceptable in RCC

here’s how the catechism states:

**2387 **The predicament of a man who, desiring to convert to the Gospel, is obliged to repudiate one or more wives with whom he has shared years of conjugal life, is understandable. However *polygamy *is not in accord with the moral law." [Conjugal] communion is radically contradicted by polygamy; this, in fact, directly negates the plan of God which was revealed from the beginning, because it is contrary to the equal personal dignity of men and women who in matrimony give themselves with a love that is total and therefore unique and exclusive."179 The Christian who has previously lived in polygamy has a grave duty in justice to honor the obligations contracted in regard to his former wives and his children.


#3

I expect this will be the next battlefield after the so-called “gay marrage” is played out. In fact, I am supprised that the ACLU has not filed any law suits on this in hehalf of Muslims (I think some can have upto four wives in Islam).

PF


#4

I’m not sure if Mormons consider themselves Christian but by definition they’re not, since they believe in three gods instead of the Trinity.


#5

What’s all this talk about two or more wives?

I can’t even find one!:crying:


#6

I feel what the Catechism says and have always felt it. It’s always been a strong tradition in my family – none would be even remotely romantic with two people at a time. It’s also been a very strong tradition in my country, but morals have loosened up everywhere now.


#7

[quote=DJJG]What’s all this talk about two or more wives?

I can’t even find one!:crying:

[/quote]

And one is all some of us can handle!!


#8

Handling a girlfriend is already tough. :wink:


#9

[quote=KiwiCatholic86]I’m not sure if Mormons consider themselves Christian but by definition they’re not, since they believe in three gods instead of the Trinity.
[/quote]

LOL! No, this belief is in the same rubbish bin as Sacrificing Babies and having a seperate “Bible”.

  1. Mormons ARE Christian and whoever tells you otherwise is sadly misguided.

  2. LDS belive in the same trinity as Catholics, only they believe that God the Father has a body, since we were made in his image (though I personally do not subscibe to this).

  3. Though the practice of Polygamy was practced back in the early day’s of the church, it was banned in 1852 and is today an excomunicatable offense. There is an “offshoot” of excommunicated former members in Southern Utah and Arizona (who have just recently moved to Texas) called the Reformed Orthadox church that do practice polygamy, but they are in no way associated with the LDS church or even recognized by the LDS church.

And just remember what the bible say’s about multiple wives. “No man may serve 2 masters” :smiley:


#10

[quote=†ChristPaladin†]I was watching a news special about a man(who i believe was mormon; please correct me if i’m wrong) who had four wives.
[/quote]

If what you describe is correct, this man would not be what I consider a mormon. People practicing polygamy now in the LDS church get excommunicated when found out. Perhaps he might be called a “mormon fundamentalist” or an “apostate mormon” but referring to him as a just a “mormon” appears to be a misleading classification.


#11

[quote=Jo’s_Dad]LOL! No, this belief is in the same rubbish bin as Sacrificing Babies and having a seperate “Bible”.
[/quote]

LOL. Nice post! I wouldn’t have responded if I had seen your post first.


#12

Mormon Fool,

What get’s me is that the way the trinity was explained to me in the LDS church is exactly the same way (with the exception of God having a body) that it was explained to me in the Catholic church, yet one’s right and one’s wrong???

LOL! I’m beginning to see the world through Noah’s eyes :smiley: Can you toss me a hammer and round up those flamingo’s? :smiley:


#13

[quote=Jo’s_Dad]Mormon Fool,

What get’s me is that the way the trinity was explained to me in the LDS church is exactly the same way (with the exception of God having a body) that it was explained to me in the Catholic church, yet one’s right and one’s wrong???

LOL! I’m beginning to see the world through Noah’s eyes :smiley: Can you toss me a hammer and round up those flamingo’s? :smiley:
[/quote]

I am still looking for a dictionary that defines christians based on a whether a particular model of the Trinity is believed in. :smiley:


#14

Hypothetic question:

You are living in 18th century Ireland. Your wife’s sister’s husband (or your brother) has died, leaving a widow with four young children. You sister-in-law has no resources to live on her own, and no home. There are no single men worthy of her in the area. You are in relatively good shape-- maybe a teamster. Do you allow her and the children to starve to death, etc, or do you take them into your home? Given no other relatives available to do so-- no other alternatives?

It could be a scandal to those who don’t understand, but the alternative would be worse. It would be difficult to live chastely in such circumstances, but would you do it?

Given that she is willing to do whatever she can to help support the family.

I state this question in a strictly Catholic context, to illustrate the problem of a person with more than one spouse who converts to Catholic Christianity, and his responsibility to the extra spouse(s).


#15

[quote=mormon fool]If what you describe is correct, this man would not be what I consider a mormon. People practicing polygamy now in the LDS church get excommunicated when found out. Perhaps he might be called a “mormon fundamentalist” or an “apostate mormon” but referring to him as a just a “mormon” appears to be a misleading classification.
[/quote]

This is debatable among Mormons on who is the apostate:

Polygamy is unambiguously condemned in the Book of Mormon, which calls it “whoredoms” (Jacob 2:26-27). But 13 years after the Book of Mormon was first printed, a revelation to Smith was recorded in the Doctrine and Covenants, proclaiming polygamy “a new and an everlasting covenant.” All those “who have this law revealed unto them must obey” it. “No one can reject this covenant and be permitted to enter” into the Lord’s glory (D&C 132:4-6)…

…It is anticipated that God will flip-flop again. Polygamy is still a requirement for godhood, and there will not only be polygamous marriages in the afterlife, but on earth, in the future, as well. Mormons anticipate there will be futher revelation from God through the Mormon prophet on plural marriage. The “holy practice will commence again after the Second Coming of the son of Man and the ushering in of the millennium.” (Mormon Doctrine, 578) The government presumably will not be threatening the Mormon church then, so it will be safe for God to reintroduce the practice…

-Inside Mormonism, p. 477-8


#16

[quote=Jo’s_Dad]LOL! No, this belief is in the same rubbish bin as Sacrificing Babies and having a seperate “Bible”.

  1. Mormons ARE Christian and whoever tells you otherwise is sadly misguided.

  2. LDS belive in the same trinity as Catholics, only they believe that God the Father has a body, since we were made in his image (though I personally do not subscibe to this).

:smiley:
[/quote]

  1. Sorry, Christians are not polytheistic, while Mormons are. Mormons believe in an eternal progression of countless gods.

  2. That’s not correct. Catholics hold that there is one God, not many. There are three persons in the Trinity, but one nature. Humans have one nature, one person. Chairs have one nature, zero persons.


#17

[quote=DeFide]1. Sorry, Christians are not polytheistic, while Mormons are. Mormons believe in an eternal progression of countless gods.

  1. That’s not correct. Catholics hold that there is one God, not many. There are three persons in the Trinity, but one nature. Humans have one nature, one person. Chairs have one nature, zero persons.
    [/quote]

Related Link: catholic.com/library/Gods_of_the_Mormon_Church.asp


#18

[quote=DeFide]This is debatable among Mormons on who is the apostate:
[/quote]

You are probably right about that. What constitutes an “apostate mormon” is slightly subjective. And I am guessing someone I call an “apostate mormon” might not identify themselves as such. I was only appealing to greater accuracy than the alternative. Perhaps “schismatic mormon” might be better than my 2nd suggestion.

Really there is no debate that the main definition of mormon is a member of the LDS church. This is the common association everyone makes. Beyond that the use of the word “mormon” becomes ambiguous and highly problematic.To suggest some random polygamist is “mormon” is misleading. Shouldn’t we strive for greater accuracy? It doesn’t hurt my fingers all that much to type up an additional word for clarity.

As for your quote, I addressed some of the assertions of it on another thread on this message board if you want to search.

fool
"heretical christian"


#19

Want to learn more about the LDS (Mormans)? Here are some links.

utlm.org/navtopicalindex.htm
mormon.org/learn/0,8672,957-1,00.html

PS. It was Joe Smith, the great Morman prophet, that helped in part lead me home to the Catholic Church. I owe him and some Baptist preachers a great debt.


#20

When I went to BYU back in the late 70’s I remember my roommates discussing at the dinner table if they could accept their future husband taking another wife if celestial marriage was ever reinstated. They seemed to feel that it was suspended for now, but could possibly begin again in their lifetimes through revelation. They definately believed it would be practiced in the celestial kingdom in the next life, especially for single women who died and needed a man with the priesthood to call them forth. They felt there were more worthy women and not enough worthy men! Of course, this was just young adult speculation, but formed out of concern for certain beliefs prevelant at the time.

What started the speculation was a young married guy (non-student) on the block who was ex-ed because he took another wife. He studied church teaching and believed a few things like 1) the revelation didn’t begin “Thus saith the Lord (or something like that)” and 2) that some of the apostles continued to have children with their numerous wives even after the revelation until the church clamped down a few years later when the government was about to move in to enforce law. I guess he believed the church lost it’s authority on this issue because my roommates were troubled that he had sent a flyer out to the houses quoting apostles and General Authorities who, prior to the revelation ending polygamy, said things in all their writings and speeches that it wouldn’t end in this life and there were severe penalties for those that didn’t go along with it. But as I said, he was excommunicated.

The reason I took note of his reasoning was that everyone there told me the great apostasy happened and the church Jesus set up was taken from the earth because of the Catholic Church’s changing of Christ’s teachings. So I wondered why they didn’t hold onto the first decades of Joseph Smith and Brigham Young’s teachings…which was easily explained away by them of the glory of continuous revelation between God and the prophet.


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