Pope: Anti-Semitism Part of Wave of `Depraved Hatred'

VATICAN CITY —

Pope Francis on Friday branded anti-Semitism part of a wave of “depraved hatred” sweeping some countries and urged everyone to be vigilant against it.

In comments to members of the American Jewish Committee during a visit to the Vatican, he also reiterated that it was sinful for Christians to hold anti-Semitic sentiments because they shared a heritage with Jews.

“A source of great concern to me is the spread, in many places, of a climate of wickedness and fury, in which an excessive and depraved hatred is taking root,” Francis said. “I think especially of the outbreak of anti-Semitic attacks in various countries.”

“A source of great concern to me is the spread, in many places, of a climate of wickedness and fury, in which an excessive and depraved hatred is taking root,” Francis said. “I think especially of the outbreak of anti-Semitic attacks in various countries.”

Francis did not name any of those countries, but government statistics released last month showed more than 500 anti-Semitic attacks occurred last year in France, which has Europe’s biggest Jewish community. That was a 74 percent increase from 2017.

“I stress that for a Christian any form of anti-Semitism is a rejection of one’s own origins, a complete contradiction,” Francis said.

A European Union study last month showed that more than one in three European Jews have considered emigrating in the past five years because they no longer feel safe.

Episodes of anti-Semitism have coincided with the rise of populist or nationalist parties in predominantly Christian countries such as Italy, Germany, Poland and Hungary. In Britain, nine lawmakers quit the Labour party last month, citing the leadership’s handling of anti-Semitism in the party as a reason for leaving………………………………………………………

Interesting. It does appear over the past 2 years there have been more bugs crawling out of the gutter than I can remember, an unfortunate state of affairs.

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The increase in anti Semitism has coincided with a wave of large scale Islamic immigration into Europe.

The rise of nationalist politics has coincided with that large scale Islamic immigration.

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I was about to make the same observation.

Wonder if there is any causal connection.

Could work both ways…people who elect immigration cautious governments may be doing it. Or immigrants from Islamic countries may be doing it.
Somehow I do not think the second option will get media consideration.

This all goes back to the fear of difference and some Europeans (minority) being afraid of the loss of their “culture”.

We see an unfortunate rise in elections of nationalistic figures.

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Sometimes those politicians who get labelled as “nationalistic” are those who are resistant or less accomodating to the power of secularism and the media.

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I suspect you are right.

Or seeing unfamiliar faces and hearing unfamiliar faces in a community often results in a rise of “othering” that can turn violent.

That is left wing indoctrination so that you can look down on a certain populace who you have been told behave this way often without realising you are actually being conditioned and bullied to accept Left wing agendas through a false morality.

For me. That is the evil of our time.

The recent Smollett and Covington cases in the US are indicative of how this conditioned group are actually the ones needing to see the other as acting in a certain way.

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Respectfully, this sounds more like indoctrination and not the scholarly history of antisemitism (which again goes back much further than “our time”).

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I am not talking about a scholarly look at historical anti Semitism. That is something different and we can discuss the credibility of Left wing agendas in higher education pushing such thinking again to condition the people they are trying to influence.

We are talking about the rise in anti Semitism in Europe today.

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Right. But perhaps you should be. If you were, you’d likely see the problem with this statement:

Antisemitism doesn’t differentiate between political ideologies, sadly.

Which comes from both the left and the right.

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The UK labour politicians walking out calling their party racist and anti-Semitic along with the anti-Semitic views of the US Islamic Democratic congresswoman and the anti-Semitic charges against the Australian Labor Party are all from the left side of politics.

These are elected officials to the highest level of government in the land. I do not see anything comparable on the right side of politics.

Along with this observation is that the Left side of politics also has a false morality that somehow force the view that it is the other side of politics that behave in such a way. This is simply projection and a false morality that needs to be in the place to continue the grievance mentality that infects the Left side of politics.

It is an evil mentality and destructive of civil society.

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What, if anything, is different about today’s anti-Semitism?

On some level, it is the same old, same old. The construct is the same, the stereotypes are the same. But I think what is different today is that we’re seeing a perfect storm, in that usually it comes from either the right or the left politically. Today we’re seeing it from the political right and the political left, and we are seeing it particularly—not only, but particularly—in Europe from Islamist extremists, or jihadists, or whatever term you’d like to use.

The other element that makes today different is that we’re living at a time when there are a number of heads of state, and not just our own, who have created an atmosphere which gives comfort to the people who engage in this kind of thing. Whether you’re talking about Viktor Orbán, in Hungary, or the leaders of the P.I.S. Party, in Poland, or the A.F.D., in Germany.

The groups you listed are all right-wing. Do you think it’s worth distinguishing between right-wing and left-wing anti-Semitism, or do you think that they’re arising from similar things, and it’s more helpful to think of them together?

No, we’re not talking about completely different phenomena. They’re the same because they rely on the same stereotypical elements. I know it when I see it. Now, that’s not a sufficient definition, but it’s that way with anti-Semitism. I know it when I see it because these are the elements that are there—something to do with money, something to do with finance, that Jews will do anything and everything, irrespective of whom it harms or displaces or burdens. Both the right and the left share those kinds of stereotypes.

And they also do come from people who feel that somehow things are changing and we’ve got to find someone to blame it on. Were they to blame them on the bicycle riders, everyone would look at them and say, “You’re nuts.” But, whether it’s loss of jobs, whether it’s globalization, whatever it might be, if you blame it on a familiar figure, that makes sense.

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ok first paragraph.

There has been a sharp uptick in hate crimes against Jews, and prominent politicians and heads of state, including Donald Trump and Hungary’s Viktor Orbán, have wooed voters with anti-Semitism (and, perhaps, just expressed their honest opinions).

Trump’s daughter converted to Judaism and her Jewish husband as far as I know has been an integral part of the Trump collective. Trump has also resurrected the relationship (excuse the pun) with the Israeli government and supported Israel by the symbolic move of the embassy to Jerusalem and recognising it as the capital of the Israeli state.

I’ve listed very briefly the links of anti-Semitism to Leftist politics today. Is the writer that you linked to actually trying to include Donald Trump as an example of anti Semitism on the right? My God that is so ridiculous. Where does such a warped mindset come from I wonder?

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From the article :

today’s anti-Semitism…………… we are seeing it particularly—not only, but particularly—in Europe from Islamist extremists, or jihadists, or whatever term you’d like to use.

which is obvious and supports my original point.

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The other element that makes today different is that we’re living at a time when there are a number of heads of state, and not just our own, who have created an atmosphere which gives comfort to the people who engage in this kind of thing.

This is an extremely weak charge. Created an atmosphere which gives comfort…

Really? That is the extent of the charge?

This feeds into the bias of Left wing conditioning based on prejudice and feelings of moral superiority. Where is the actual serious charges? I don’t speak Hungarian or Polish but I speak English and the idea that Trump s creating an atmosphere of anti Semitism is so far from reality,

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Perhaps you should read her latest book. And her bona fides.

https://www.amazon.com/Antisemitism-Here-Deborah-Lipstadt/dp/0805243372/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=lipstadt+antisemitism&qid=1552276447&s=gateway&sr=8-1

Fortunately you don’t need to.

In CNN’s recent survey, 42% of Hungarians polled said they thought Jews held too much sway over the worlds of finance and international affairs. While an average of one in 10 Europeans said they personally had an “unfavourable attitude” to Jews, the figure rose to nearly 15% in Poland and 19% in Hungary.

and…

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