Pope encourages French politicians to serve common good [CC]


#1

Speaking on November 30 to a group of French political leaders, Pope Francis said that Christians should cooperation “with believers of all religions, and all men of good will, even non-believers, in order to promote the building of a better world.”

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#2

Pope Francis said that Christians should cooperation “with believers of all religions, and all men of good will, even non-believers, in order to promote the building of a better world.”

I think there is a real problem here that Christians have been doing this for decades now to such an extent that they have ceased to think of themselves as Christians but of a wishy washy secular commonality that isn’t working out how they first imagined.

The Pope remarked that in France today, there is great potential for growth, “provided that the republican values of liberty, equality, and fraternity are not just bandied about in an illusory manner, but are explored and understood in relation to their true foundation, which is transcendent.”

My understanding was that the French values of liberty, equality and fraternity were deliberately founded in opposition to Christian concepts of transcendency. Happy to be shown differently.


#3

This is not a new argument. It goes back hundreds of years to the debates about the role of missionaries. The “purists” believed that the sole purpose of missionaries was to spread the gospel by converting non-believers. Others (like St. Teresa of Calcutta more recently) believed that in addition to spreading the Word, their role was to put into practice corporal works of mercy as evidence of the Word. The first group gave Christianity a bad name by teaming up with exploitive secular powers who saw converted heathens as easier to dominate. Fortunately, the second group won out. It is the view of this second group that motivates Pope Francis to say what he said.


#4

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