Pope Francis invites homeless to dine at Vatican

From CNA:
On July 1 Pope Francis invited a group of 200 homeless individuals to dinner at the Vatican, where they were served in his name by Cardinal Giuseppe Bertello.

Cardinal Bertello, president of the Governatorate of the Vatican City State, spent the entire evening with the special guests, with whom he chatted at length and shared personal experiences, according to the July 3 edition of L’Osservatore Romano.

“I welcome you in the name of the Pope. As you know, this is your home, and he is pleased that you are here,” he told the group of homeless persons before dinner was served.
Nice.

God Blees the Pope.

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Dios bendiga al Papa Francisco. :thumbsup:

How awesome is this?

It’s a great thing that has been done in some manner by most popes for a long time. Benedict XVI often dined with the poor/homeless.

I hope this encourages us faithful to do more of this! (I hope it encourages me!!!)

WONDERFUL! And now on to building apartments for those homeless on church owned grounds. Yeah!

Actually, there are many of these apartment complexes on Church property or other property, but operated by the Church. The problem with housing is that the number of homeless people around the world increases at a faster rate than housing. To provide housing, you not only need the land and the buildings, but you also need the infrastructure and financial resources to maintain them so that they don’t turn into slums.

not to mention conditional use permits and variances and rezoning and permits from the health department, fire department, police department, and the complaints from the neighbors whose single family residences have just taken a nosedive in value.

THis is great news.

I do think that at least on accession, meals for the poor have been offered in some part of Vatican City.

I’d have to look it up though.

Still Francis is awesome@

JR: “Actually, there are many of these apartment complexes on Church property or other property, but operated by the Church. The problem with housing is that the number of homeless people around the world increases at a faster rate than housing.”

Annie: Jesus said “the poor you will always have with you”. Do you suppose He said this to teach the disciples that there are just too many poor people so don’t try to help any because it will be too overwhelming? I read in the bible that we are going to be judged according to what we did Matt. 25:31f

JR: To provide housing, you not only need the land and the buildings, but you also need the infrastructure and financial resources to maintain them so that they don’t turn into slums.

Annie: Yes and we need leaders who can organize this. The financial resources should come from us; not to mention our elbow grease. Why should we expect the government to do that which Christians have been commissioned to do and what we will be judged on. I live not far from a city with a large population of people who live in federally subsidized housing. Why is the federal government doing this, why not us? I have thoughts also of setting up training facilities for the unskilled. We have done this before if I can say “we” regarding the Jesuits because they were Catholic and so am I. Read these urls to see what the Jesuits did for the indigenous people of Paraguay and elsewhere. benverhoeftours.com/jesuitmissions.html
projectparaguay.com/guarani.htm
While being trained for skills they could also be taught what it means to be productive citizens and give back. The Church could teach them how blessed they are to be receiving this help and they should in turn give to others
FW: not to mention conditional use permits and variances and rezoning and permits from the health department, fire department, police department, and the complaints from the neighbors whose single family residences have just taken a nosedive in value.

Annie: There are many obstacles to overcome. We all need to do our part. We have lawyers. I’m thinking that at least some of them will do pro bono work for our Church. I’m betting that we have constructions workers, electricians and people who are skilled in the art of persuasion who could organize meetings to smooth things over in the neighborhoods (Calling all Irishmen). Especially when they know that those who we are helping are being taught Catholic morals.

Just think of the work that the Franciscans did. Although I have read much about how the Indians were forced into slavery by the missionaries I have seen no proof of that. I live in Southern California and have been to many missions. I have seen how the monks lived including the room that Fr. Junípero Serra
lived. It is a humble tiny room. No luxury there (sound like any new Pope we know?) I think that what happened is that the monks built the mission for the Indians but they required them to work on the property as a means to support the mission itself. I have those same thoughts about the people who the Church would shelter. We should not have to hire grounds keepers. We should allow those people the ability to work out their own salvation by doing their part in feeding the hungry etc.
The Church already owns much unused land. Think of Castel Gondolfo. Pope Pius XII sheltered Jews there during WWII. I’m thinking that Pope Francis is very much like him. Housing could be built to fit into the landscape so as to keep its beauty. The Pope might inspire the Bishops around the world.

Yes JReducation and Fairwinds it will be difficult. And there will be false starts (I’m thinking of St. Francis miss starts ie rebuilding the physical church and the incident with his father’s merchandise). He didn’t stop there. Neither did the Jesuits in or the Franciscans in Mexico.

Pax et Bonum

Annie

I don’t think that anyone is disagreeing with you. What we’re saying is that it requires more than we can produce in a timely fashion. If you look around, new projects for the homeless are going on everyday around the world, all directed and paid for by the Church. But we just can’t keep up.

I do disagree with one thing. I don’t know who said it, but I read it in your post above. The comment about the cells that the monks lived in in the California missions. Franciscans are not monks and we are very offended when people call us monks as monks are very offended when people call them friars. These are very different vocations, deliberately juxtaposed by the Church.

I don’t understand why people are turning every single act like this into a news piece. I cannot speak as if I were a Pope, but if I were in an influential position I would try very hard to make sure that my acts of charity are not publicized. At least not small ones that are part of everyday life.

Part of the issue lies in Pope Francis being a public figure and the excessive media efforts to fashion significant news stories from the daily lives of every public figure, celebrity, etc. I’m sure that the Holy Father wanted to make these people feel welcomed, loved, and at home. It got media attention. The other thread which spoke about him having the statue removed is indicative that he is intent on the focus not being on him, but on God. I see him trying to live his role in the Church as humbly and faithfully as possible. This in turn has helped me to rethink my own role within the Church and how I go about serving others.

Bro. JR: I don’t think that anyone is disagreeing with you. What we’re saying is that it requires more than we can produce in a timely fashion. If you look around, new projects for the homeless are going on everyday around the world, all directed and paid for by the Church. But we just can’t keep up.

Annie: I don’t want to go into too much detail. It might look like too much finger pointing. I will ask you if you think that the people in the Church in general and maybe those in your Diocese in particular are are doing all that they can or do they even come close to reasonably doing all that they can? I can tell you about my diocese. They are not and I am privy to the projects that they are involved in. Do you think that if we put our collective shoulders to the wheel that we could do a better job of keeping up?

BJR: I do disagree with one thing. I don’t know who said it, but I read it in your post above. The comment about the cells that the monks lived in in the California missions. Franciscans are not monks and we are very offended when people call us monks as monks are very offended when people call them friars. These are very different vocations, deliberately juxtaposed by the Church.

A: That made me LOL. For the record, I know the difference between a monk and a friar. I just misspoke or mistyped in this case. My mind was on the bigger and I think more important picture. I have been a follower of St. Francis for many years though not officially due to circumstances beyond my control. I have known many Franciscans throughout my life and I have never come across one who actually takes offense at this sort of mistake. I don’t know about monks though since I have never met one.

Pax et Bonum

Annie

I see your point and ordinarily I would agree with you however Pope Francis is so very different in the best sense of that word and as such is a living reminder of how we should live the Christian life. I think that small instances like the fact that people had to buy him a new pair of shoes to go to the Vatican because his had holes in them is the type of thing that is so very St. Francisesque to coin a word. St. Francis was wedded to Lady Poverty.

For good or ill, the media will do what it wants… How many times do you think Pope Francis has his picture taken every day?

Pope Francis is very good copy, nowadays. He is THE most recognizable religious figure in the world. ANYTHING he does is news, whether he wants it to be or not. I don’t think Pope Francis will get all Sean Penn on the shutterbugs; rather he may just be content to be the Vicar of Christ; preaching the Gospel. Using words from time to time. More power to him :smiley:

Because some of them are just so endearing like cancelling his newspaper. Yes, that is something that normal people do, but famous people don’t. It was as if someone forgot to tell Francis that he was now in charge of the entire Church or it hadn’t (or still hasn’t) sunk in. It did take about nine days for this to leak out, so it was done pretty secretively, but the Pope is fascinating to the press because he gives them lots of good headlines.

When you’re living as Pope Francis does, in the middle of the crowd, everything you do is going to be seen and commented on, good or bad. He has no control over that.

I’m not authorized to speak for the diocese, but I can say what I see. I see housing for seniors, unwed mothers, homeless, people with disabilities. I see property being used for pregnancy centers, soup kitchens, shelters. We have property used for respite, long-term rehabilitation. We have property being turned into center for prayer. And we have properties used to pay bills. I think the biggest bill in any diocese is going to be the seminary. Seminaries are not cheap to run. It costs millions of dollars. We’re talking about an undergraduate and graduate school that has to meet state and international requirements to grant degrees.

A: That made me LOL. For the record, I know the difference between a monk and a friar. I just misspoke or mistyped in this case. My mind was on the bigger and I think more important picture. I have been a follower of St. Francis for many years though not officially due to circumstances beyond my control. I have known many Franciscans throughout my life and I have never come across one who actually takes offense at this sort of mistake. I don’t know about monks though since I have never met one.

That and clericalism are very touchy issues in the renewal movement. Because we’re trying to get away from both images and restore image of the friar without the monastic and priestly focus. We do borrow some things from monks, such as the LOTH and we do have clerics. But we are not monks or clerics.

Among Benedictines there is a strong push to disengage them from the friars. Often, people think that because a Benedictine can be engaged in an apostolic work, this makes him the same as a friar, which is not true. Within the religious life, the monastic vocation is a call to find Christ in solitude, prayer and labor. The friar finds Christ in brotherhood, prayer and service.

No one is going to be offended to the point of calling you on the carpet for it. It’s not as serious as calling one a pig. Calling a friar a monk or a monk a friar is not at that level. But it is something that we’re trying very hard to change.

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