Pope: Memorize prayers in Latin

VATICAN CITY (CNS) – Presenting the new “Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church,” Pope Benedict XVI urged Catholics around the world to memorize the most common Catholic prayers in Latin. Learning the prayers in Latin as well as in one’s own language “will help Christian faithful of different languages pray together, especially when they gather for special circumstances,” the pope said June 28 as he distributed the Italian version of the compendium, which included an appendix with the Latin texts of many traditional prayers, including the Sign of the Cross, the Gloria, the Hail Mary and Come, Holy Spirit. The pope said he hoped the compendium, a 200-page synthesis of the voluminous 1992 catechism, would give Catholics and non-Catholics easy access to the basic and essential tenets of the Catholic faith.


Brief

AMEN AMEN AMEN !!! Go B16!!

:clapping: :dancing: :bounce: :love:

Does anyone know of a website or book that would list these prayers as well as the proper pronunciations of the Latin words? This would be a great summer activity with the children.

Never mind…I found a website listing the words of many prayers as well as providing a voice that pronounces each word:
trosch.org/chu/latin-prayers.html.

God Bless!

I was looking through that site, and I think they are a bit over in the radtrad ideology. The prayers are correct, however.

A safer site would be preces-latinae.org/index.htm .

It is interesting though, I personally took it upon myself to learn the prayers of the Rosary in Latin, just because I like the sound of Latin. I have memorized the Pater Noster (Our Father), Ave Maria (Hail Mary), Doxologia Minor (Glory Be), Domine Jesu (Fatima Prayer) but still have trouble with the Salve Regina (Hail Holy Queen), the Symbolum Apostolorum (Apostles’ Creed), and the ending prayer (can’t even remember the name right off :o ).

Thank the Lord for our Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI!!!

Comrade…
Thanks. I went back and looked at the website further…you’re right about their “agenda”. Hatred for such a holy man as JP2, I’ll never understand.

[quote=ComradeAndrei]A safer site would be preces-latinae.org/index.htm .
[/quote]

Thanks for posting that web address; that site will be very helpful!

(Although I’m still struggling to try to learn the pronunciation of the Rosary prayers in French. :o )



Crazy Internet Junkie Society
****Carrier of the Angelic Sparkles Sprinkle Bag

[quote=SueG]:clapping: :dancing: :bounce: :love:

Does anyone know of a website or book that would list these prayers as well as the proper pronunciations of the Latin words? This would be a great summer activity with the children.
[/quote]

Although it does not have the proper pronunciation, the Handbook of Prayers by James Socias has maby of the more common prayers on facing pages in Latin and English. It also has the order of the Mass in both Latin and English on facing pages.

In fact, I have to find mind before I goto Mass tomorrow night. Some of it was in Latin.

PF

I hope it’s like riding a bike, it all comes back to you. Was in Fla for a Holy Day Mass a couple of years ago on the feast of the Assumption and the cantor sang Salve Regina, it was like a light going on, I just belted it out, and it has been a long time since our Sodality at St. Mary’s High School had that as our “theme song”. I have Fr. Hardon’s prayer book and it has the prayers in English and Latin.

[quote=stumbler]Learning the prayers in Latin as well as in one’s own language “will help Christian faithful of different languages pray together, especially when they gather for special circumstances,” the pope said …
[/quote]

:amen:

I hasten to add that learning the Mass (the greatest prayer of all) in Latin will help bring greater unity to Christian faithful of different languages as well.

[quote=SueG]:clapping: :dancing: :bounce: :love:

Does anyone know of a website or book that would list these prayers as well as the proper pronunciations of the Latin words? This would be a great summer activity with the children.
[/quote]

This is the best one that I have been able to find:

shrinesf.org/rosary.htm

These are the Latin-English prayer books I use:

[left]***[size=3]The Rosary in Latin and English***


Beginner’s Guide to Ecclesiastical Latin


The Way of the Cross in Latin and English [/left]
[/size]

dominanostrapublishing.com/id6.html

Great, I’m becoming relevant again.

Does anyone know exactly which prayers are on the list?

My priest mentioned the compendium, and that we are to learn some prayers in latin (he thought there were 4), but he didn’t know which ones.

Does anyone have access to, or know where I can find, the list of prayers that the Pope wants us to learn in Latin?

Thanx!

I dunno about those website pronunciations. [font=Comic Sans MS]I’m no language expert, but I do have a keen ear for accents, and the recordings made me shudder - they sounded like Americanized Latin rather than true Latin. When listening to Latin spoken at the Vatican, it sounds much more like what I would expect.[/font]

Can anyone correct me on this?

Almost forgot what I really wanted to say. If the Holy Father is telling us to memorize the Latin prayers, does this indicate that we may expect to see them more frequently in the mass? :clapping:

[quote=TeriGator]I dunno about those website pronunciations. [font=Comic Sans MS]I’m no language expert, but I do have a keen ear for accents, and the recordings made me shudder - they sounded like Americanized Latin rather than true Latin. When listening to Latin spoken at the Vatican, it sounds much more like what I would expect.[/font]

Can anyone correct me on this?

[/quote]

Yeah, it is a bit like hearing English spoken by someone from the deep South… :whistle:

[quote=otm]Yeah, it is a bit like hearing English spoken by someone from the deep South… :whistle:
[/quote]

And just who would you be referring to? :ehh: :smiley:

I have a multitude of accents because I have lived in so many different areas in the U.S. It’s amazing to see the difference even from town to town. For instance, Cedar City, Utah, has its own peculiar pronunciations that aren’t common anywhere else. East Texans don’t sound like West Texans, Northern Californians don’t sound like Southern Californians, and even the California valleys have different accents. I can almost always tell a Southerner, even if they have worked hard to overcome their accent. Sometimes I can even tell which state they are from.

Anyway, back to Latin - I know that ecclesial Latin is spoken differently than secular Latin, but I have never had a chance to compare the two.

Call me a geek, but I would love to have the time to study dialects of the world. :nerd:

[quote=TeriGator]does this indicate that we may expect to see them more frequently in the mass?
[/quote]

One can only hope. I, for one, have been hoping for our parishes to get around to implementing GIRM #41


  1. Since faithful from different countries come together ever more frequently, it is fitting that they know how to sing together at least some parts of the Ordinary of the Mass in Latin, especially the Creed and the Lord’s Prayer, set to the simpler melodies.

tee

But what does this mean for our regular parish Mass? Or are you seeing this as a small step Pope Benedict is making towards liturgical reform. I guess I’m failing to see the impact of his statement.

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