Pope: Memorize prayers in Latin

[quote=Elzee]But what does this mean for our regular parish Mass? Or are you seeing this as a small step Pope Benedict is making towards liturgical reform. I guess I’m failing to see the impact of his statement.
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Well, I think were seeing a step towards a more traditional Church. In fact, our Priest even mentioned this after Mass last Sunday- He wanted to let everybody know that they needed to brush up on their Latin.

I think many of us are hopeful that we will see the winds of change blow the putrid stench of the last 30 years out of our Church…

[quote=stumbler]VATICAN CITY (CNS) – Presenting the new “Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church,” Pope Benedict XVI urged Catholics around the world to memorize the most common Catholic prayers in Latin. Learning the prayers in Latin as well as in one’s own language “will help Christian faithful of different languages pray together, especially when they gather for special circumstances,” the pope said June 28 as he distributed the Italian version of the compendium, which included an appendix with the Latin texts of many traditional prayers, including the Sign of the Cross, the Gloria, the Hail Mary and Come, Holy Spirit. The pope said he hoped the compendium, a 200-page synthesis of the voluminous 1992 catechism, would give Catholics and non-Catholics easy access to the basic and essential tenets of the Catholic faith.


Brief
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great! may i know where did you get this info? is there any link that i can go to? thanks

Realizing I’m going to be stepping on lots of toes with this . . . originally, Latin was chosen as the language of the Church because it was supposedly the “universal” language. The goal seemed honorable, yet it never really was universal since most of the laity never could understand a single word being spoken, it was only the educated who knew what was going on, thus, in reality, it led to distancing the people from their faith.

Today, Latin is nearly dead. No one outside of some Catholic clergy and a few obscure scholars speak Latin, so it’s the least viable means to use as a unifier. If the Pope truly wanted to unify the faithful, he would recommend prayers be memorized in English, that is the closest thing to a universal language the world has ever had since pre-Babel days.

David

[quote=DavidB]Realizing I’m going to be stepping on lots of toes with this . . . originally, Latin was chosen as the language of the Church because it was supposedly the “universal” language. The goal seemed honorable, yet it never really was universal since most of the laity never could understand a single word being spoken, it was only the educated who knew what was going on, thus, in reality, it led to distancing the people from their faith.

Today, Latin is nearly dead. No one outside of some Catholic clergy and a few obscure scholars speak Latin, so it’s the least viable means to use as a unifier. If the Pope truly wanted to unify the faithful, he would recommend prayers be memorized in English, that is the closest thing to a universal language the world has ever had since pre-Babel days.

David
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I think the Pope only wants us to memorise these common Prayers like the Pater Noster etc. I know that is is difficult to study Latin but if we can at least memorise these common prayer we can pray in unity.

I think it is as easy as memorising a french song if you are an american. Or memorising African song if you are a german. You dont need to study other language but to memorise and at least to know the meaning of these (which is basically there are lots of translation in different languages.

[quote=ComradeAndrei]I was looking through that site, and I think they are a bit over in the radtrad ideology. The prayers are correct, however.

A safer site would be preces-latinae.org/index.htm .

It is interesting though, I personally took it upon myself to learn the prayers of the Rosary in Latin, just because I like the sound of Latin. I have memorized the Pater Noster (Our Father), Ave Maria (Hail Mary), Doxologia Minor (Glory Be), Domine Jesu (Fatima Prayer) but still have trouble with the Salve Regina (Hail Holy Queen), the Symbolum Apostolorum (Apostles’ Creed), and the ending prayer (can’t even remember the name right off :o ).
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That site to which you’ve linked is ideal IMO

Thank the Lord for our Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI!!!

Presumably that means you have been praying the customary prayer, with response & versicle, for the Pope :slight_smile:

[quote=DavidB]Realizing I’m going to be stepping on lots of toes with this . . . originally, Latin was chosen as the language of the Church because it was supposedly the “universal” language. The goal seemed honorable, yet it never really was universal since most of the laity never could understand a single word being spoken, it was only the educated who knew what was going on, thus, in reality, it led to distancing the people from their faith.

Today, Latin is nearly dead. No one outside of some Catholic clergy and a few obscure scholars speak Latin, so it’s the least viable means to use as a unifier. If the Pope truly wanted to unify the faithful, he would recommend prayers be memorized in English, that is the closest thing to a universal language the world has ever had since pre-Babel days.

David
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I think that is an excellent point. Suggesting that people memorize prayers in Latin is a waste of time, because few people will actually do it, and in the end, it will not accomplish the stated goal of unity.

I took 4 years of classical Latin in school, so I have nothing against it. I kind of enjoy hearing it, it’s like an old friend.

Pete

For those of you with small children, I would highly recommend the Holy Baby video.

It’s a “Baby Einstein” style video with all the Rosary prayers in seven languages

(English, French, Spanish, Latin, Vietnamese, German and Portuguese)

On the DVD, you can use options to choose only Latin, for example.

My kids love it and they all know the “Ave Maria” now (well OK, not the 6 month old :stuck_out_tongue: ), and the 7 year old (oldest) know his “Pater Noster”

This video is also now the standard Baptism gift we give to family and friends.

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