Possible move to the US


#1

So, me and my wife are contemplating a move to the US due to a great educational opportunity. However, this would tie us to the place for a couple of years, and I’m worried she might get pregnant while staying there. We live in Scandinavia at the moment, and there is good government support (like scholarships, maternal leave etc.) for students getting pregnant. There is support for studying abroad also, but the amount is less. I have calculated that we would get about 43 thousand dollars (over two semesters) with one child (about 37 thousand during pregnancy). We would also get free health insurance, so this should not become an expense.

As far as the US goes, there doesn’t seem to be any maternal benefits for international students (confirmed by student services), but the school would pay tuition (part of guaranteed scholarship) and possibly grant some extra money. We would, of course, apply for additional scholarships (we would prefer to avoid student loans in the US) if we decide to move forward with this. So, I was wondering whether the Catholic Church in the US offers student aid to (international) students who are catholic.

PS: My wife is a member, not me.


#2

What is being studied will also be considered.

I would contact the Diocese in the area you will be staying; they will be able to explain any benefits or services available.

You might also want to contact any relevant Religious Orders in the area; which the Diocese might put you in contact with.

There will almost certainly be services available to help your family. However; it is unlikely that you will be able to get a Catholic Scholarship to university if you are not a Catholic; unless you are studying either Philosophy or Theology; which may have opportunities for Non-Catholics.

One advantage however; if your wife has a child in America the child will most likely have American Citizenship.

From the sound of your Scholarship though; you won't have any financial problems unless you are a big spender!!!


#3

[quote="Persuader, post:1, topic:214482"]
So, I was wondering whether the Catholic Church in the US offers student aid to (international) students who are catholic.

[/quote]

What do you mean by "student aid?" Do you mean the Church giving you money because you are a student or to go to school?

Maybe I don't understand the questions. Why would the Church give you money?


#4

Sounds like Scandinavia is a pretty great place to get an education with support so you can focus on your studies and still start a family without being in debt the rest of your life... not sure you can find anything similar in the US.

You can definitely get assistance but not on the same level, at least not to my knowledge. We have a wonderful Educational Institutions here but often the financial support is lacking or is done through loans.

Would you be able to work while you are here? if so that might could balance things out for you.

Joe


#5

You say that medical will be covered. How will that come about? Make sure to look up physicians who will accept the medical coverage you'll have (and call to confirm). And many colleges have student housing for married couples (which is usually less expensive than getting a place off campus) so I'd look into that. Unless you're going to school in a high cost of living area, $37K should be more than enough.


#6

[quote="JohnDamian, post:2, topic:214482"]
I would contact the Diocese in the area you will be staying; they will be able to explain any benefits or services available.

[/quote]

Thanks, man. :thumbsup: I’ll ask my wife to look into it.

Really? I don’t know. We would be staying in a big city. As long as you stay in dorm rooms etc. I guess it’s okay, but with a baby the cost goes up quite a bit, right?

Well, the government scholarship is actually a loan (great loan, though), and if you pass classes part of the loan (something like 40%) becomes a scholarship. If you get pregnant, however, everything becomes a scholarship even if you fail your classes (pretty neat, right?). And of course, you don’t pay tuition as education is free and you get kindergarten (from the age of one) almost for free. It’s still better to be working so you can get parental leave based on full time salary, so we’re not going to plan for babies until we have full time jobs.

A government program covers your bills no matter what, but they use an American liaison (can’t remember the name) who deals with outsourced medical management. Student services said it wasn’t a problem to get medical assistance with this program. It’s simply an extension of universal health care, and we have a right to it, so I can’t imagine any problems.

That's good! :thumbsup:


#7

[quote="Persuader, post:6, topic:214482"]

I see, so at least my wife might get a scholarship. How about day care or kindergarten if a child comes?

[/quote]

Day care is available, and you would pay for that. Each university is independent, some have on-campus type day care and with others you would need to contract with a private company. Either way, you will pay for it. Day care is not free in the US, nor government subsidized.

[quote="Persuader, post:6, topic:214482"]

Student services said I could get a job if I wanted to, but that the salary would probably be between 7 and 15 dollars an hour (which really surprised me). That wouldn’t really help unless I worked a lot. I would hope I could at least earn 20 dollars an hour. Is this just unrealistic? My wife works part time at a clothing store and earns about 28 dollars an hour, and I earn about 32. No point in working yourself to death for nickels and dimes. :shrug:

[/quote]

Yes, you are unrealistic.


#8

[quote="Persuader, post:6, topic:214482"]

A government program covers your bills no matter what, but they use an American liaison (can’t remember the name) who deals with outsourced medical management. Student services said it wasn’t a problem to get medical assistance with this program. It’s simply an extension of universal health care, and we have a right to it, so I can’t imagine any problems.
:

[/quote]

Make sure you know of physicians who will accept your medical coverage. Universal health care here is not the same. Medicaid (a state run health insurance) is NOT accepted by many doctors, and those who do accept it limit themselves in the number of patients they accept. Do your research about this.


#9

[quote="1ke, post:7, topic:214482"]
Day care is available, and you would pay for that. Each university is independent, some have on-campus type day care and with others you would need to contract with a private company.

[/quote]

I know, and it’s really expensive (which is why I asked whether or not the Catholic Church might run something).

Don't worry, I did research it. The government offer international health insurance through a welfare agency. Now, the liaison is not a health insurance company, but they give you an insurance card which works as a guarantee of payment. Even if a physician doesn’t recognize the card, you can contact the liaison and they will take care of it. However, they said that this is highly unlikely and shouldn’t happen in a big city. The card is only for the sake of expediency, though. You could choose to get billed as an uninsured person, and get the money reimbursed later. :thumbsup:


#10

[quote="Persuader, post:9, topic:214482"]
I know, and it’s really expensive (which is why I asked whether or not the Catholic Church might run something).

[/quote]

No. The Church does not run day cares.


#11

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