Practical use of NFP

#21

Not to rain on your NFP parade

Don't worry, I have an umbrella. :p

That being said, two weeks abstinence still doesn't sound right. I'm reading about the Marquette mucus only model (which I gather is a variation of the Creighton model). They say, from when you notice peak mucus, abstain 6 days before that (or when "high" mucus is seen) and until evening on the 3rd day after. This makes 9-10 days tops. I don't see how you get from here to 14. And if you're cross checking with other signs you might not even need that, I don't know about that though.

Also, someone put a link in another nfp thread, a study by Georgetown University that showed NFP using couples did not have les sex than ABC couples. This doesn't really seem to match up with 2 weeks or more of abstinence.

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#22

[quote="Em_in_FL, post:20, topic:226691"]
Who told you that's normal? That sounds EXTREMELY abnormal to me!
A healthy woman has an infertile luteal phase after ovulation, which normally lasts at least 9 days.
If you're only able to have 4 days I would try to find a new instructor or method... or talk to a doctor about an underlying medical issue... because that's certainly not "normal".:o

[/quote]

I recall reading that in order for implantation to be able to occur, the luteal phase needs to be at least 10 days (or maybe it was 9). So there's 9 or 10 days right there in which you know you cannot conceive, because once you know you have already ovulated (which you can usually tell from BBT charts in addition to checking mucus), you can no longer conceive in that cycle. So even if for whatever reason it would be too "risky" to have sex in the follicular phase (before ovulation), you know you can in the luteal phase. And you know when the luteal phase is over, because the new cycle starts with menses.

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#23

[quote="Em_in_FL, post:20, topic:226691"]
Who told you that's normal? That sounds EXTREMELY abnormal to me!
A healthy woman has an infertile luteal phase after ovulation, which normally lasts at least 9 days.
If you're only able to have 4 days I would try to find a new instructor or method... or talk to a doctor about an underlying medical issue... because that's certainly not "normal".:o

[/quote]

I was told my by Creighton method instructor because I run on the shorter side of cycles (25 days) that I'm normal and I went to a NFP doctor and was cleared that there was nothing wrong or imbalanced.

People don't always fit into the perfect window that is listed in brochure - be prepared for a few "surprised" ;)

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#24

[quote="convert38, post:23, topic:226691"]
I was told my by Creighton method instructor because I run on the shorter side of cycles (25 days) that I'm normal and I went to a NFP doctor and was cleared that there was nothing wrong or imbalanced.

People don't always fit into the perfect window that is listed in brochure - be prepared for a few "surprised" ;)

[/quote]

I have a short cycle also, 24 days average, but still have a 13 day luteal phase, in which, as I have read, you can't conceive.

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#25

[quote="convert38, post:23, topic:226691"]
I was told my by Creighton method instructor because I run on the shorter side of cycles (25 days) that I'm normal and I went to a NFP doctor and was cleared that there was nothing wrong or imbalanced.

People don't always fit into the perfect window that is listed in brochure - be prepared for a few "surprised" ;)

[/quote]

Unless you have an underlying fertility issue, there is always a luteal phase post-ovulation.
If you do not have those minimum 9 days in the luteal phase, I highly suggest talking to a doctor (preferably a reproductive endocrinologist) and trying to decipher what the issue is.
It's easy to talk about "outliers" from the norm and complaining that NFP doesn't work... or you could take the next step and see if there's some way you can improve your situation!
Just trying to help - because that's certainly not a healthy, normal cycle without that luteal phase... :shrug:
Now, if you're headed into menopause, then that's a different story... ;)

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#26

[quote="SummerSmiles, post:15, topic:226691"]
Just to add to Em's response a bit. It's much easier to find your cervix when you're infertile (because it's lower) so I suggest starting your observations during one of these times. It feels like a little circle of skin gathered together. When it's more open, I find that it's just enough for the pad of my finger to "nest" in. (So it might feel more like an indentation than an actual open hole in your body.)

I remember when I first learned the cervical position check--everything was vague to me. It's like the instructor and the book were too worried about TMI, so they purposefully left out some details that would have been helpful.

[/quote]

MASSIVE TMI ALERT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you are my fiance, don't read this! :blush:

Thank you for your responses. I'm still having trouble though (and my teaching couple just thinks I'm weird for asking questions, so I don't feel comfortable asking them). I feel this thing that feels like an upside down hill, and then is disappears when I stand up. I'm very confused. Where did it go? :p My body is weird. And if there is this big lump up there blocking the whole passage, how did a guy ever have sex with me? And why do every time I try to find it, I manage to fall over and curse really loud?

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#27

:rotfl: I hope you are being facetious, because that made me laugh. Upside down hill, check, there should be an indent in the middle kind of like the top of a pear (without the stem :D). I can’t reach my cervix standing up, so that could be why it “disappears.” Oh and that big lump is the passage to the uterus. When you are fertile it opens up to allow the sperm through to implant the egg. When you are fertile that hill should move higher (ie be more difficult to reach), get softer like a pear ripening, and that indent in the middle should get bigger (more of your finger should be able to “sit” in the indent). For me, I compare it to that cycle, not to positions from other cycles.

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#28

[quote="CountrySinger, post:26, topic:226691"]
MASSIVE TMI ALERT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you are my fiance, don't read this! :blush:

Thank you for your responses. I'm still having trouble though (and my teaching couple just thinks I'm weird for asking questions, so I don't feel comfortable asking them). I feel this thing that feels like an upside down hill, and then is disappears when I stand up. I'm very confused. Where did it go? :p My body is weird. And if there is this big lump up there blocking the whole passage, how did a guy ever have sex with me? And why do every time I try to find it, I manage to fall over and curse really loud?

[/quote]

Upside down hill sounds about right. As for it disappearing when you stand, I don't think it's all that weird. That whole region is more "stretched out" when you're standing straight up rather than sitting slouched over. Think of it this way, your tummy gets kind of squished when you sit down, your insides do the same.

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#29

Regarding cervical observations, there is a site called “Beautiful Cervix” or something like that. It is a series of photographs of the cervix throughout the cycle. It is VERY graphic, so if you are squeamish it’s not for you. But if you think the human body is a beautiful thing and want to understand your own body better, I personally recommend it. As a woman with a cervix that is often so high I can’t reach it at ALL even with my longest finger, it was really helpful for me to see what’s supposed to be happening throughout the cycle so, on the rare occasions I can reach it, I know what I’m looking for.

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closed #30
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