Practices vary in CC on taking Eucharist?


#1

I know this but want to double check.

Is it so true that if you’re NOT Catholic that you CANNOT participate in the Eucharist? For example, if you’re married to a Catholic and attend Mass with them, only they can recieve the Eucharist and the non-Catholic can’t, correct?

The reason why I’m asking this is because, sigh I’m currently in a Methodist group (!!!) because I’m just too curious to know the differences that our other brethen learn. Some have told me that they DON’T agree that non-Catholics can’t take the Eucharist and I told them, well, you know, if you don’t believe everything the CC teaches, why participate? Something like that. Another one told me, regarding the Eucharist to non-Catholics, …“if you are a child of God the table should be open. It is my prayer that eventually that will be worked out but for now it is as it is.”

What on earth?

They also told me that the CC DOESN’T recognize a Methodist baptism. I told them they recognize a valid baptism from another Christian denomination…I remember also hearing this from another group…that one that I had to leave that is. I don’t know where these people are hearing this from!

One woman wrote to me:

“I’ve found in my experience that the practices in divers RC church vary. A Methodist, I’ve been in RC churches that welcomed me to take the Eucharist and some who did
not. Some members of my family and friends who married Roman Catholics were asked to be re-baptized before their children could be christened in the RC church. Some were not asked to be re-baptized. I look at all of this as squabbles in the Christian family. We still love one another”.

What’s going on here? :confused:


#2

[quote=Paris Blues]…I’ve been in RC churches that welcomed me to take the Eucharist and some who did not…
[/quote]

I have some Baptist friends who told me they had been to a parish here in Massachusetts (I don’t know which one) where the Priest had invited all Christians to receive Communion and then joked “as long as you don’t report me to the Pope.”

Blessings,
Richard


#3

[quote=Paris Blues]I know this but want to double check.

Is it so true that if you’re NOT Catholic that you CANNOT participate in the Eucharist? For example, if you’re married to a Catholic and attend Mass with them, only they can recieve the Eucharist and the non-Catholic can’t, correct?
[/quote]

That’s correct. Look inside the front cover of your missal and you’ll see a discussion of who can and who cannot take communion. The Catholic Church welcomes Othodox Christians and a couple of other Churches, but no Protestant churches.

[quote=thistle]The reason why I’m asking this is because, sigh I’m currently in a Methodist group (!!!) because I’m just too curious to know the differences that our other brethen learn. Some have told me that they DON’T agree that non-Catholics can’t take the Eucharist and I told them, well, you know, if you don’t believe everything the CC teaches, why participate? Something like that.
[/quote]

That’s a valid answer. Refer them to Canon 844. It spells out who can and who cannot take Communion.

[quote=thistle]They also told me that the CC DOESN’T recognize a Methodist baptism. I told them they recognize a valid baptism from another Christian denomination…I remember also hearing this from another group…that one that I had to leave that is. I don’t know where these people are hearing this from!
[/quote]

Again, you’re correct – it is the method that makes baptism valid, not the person who performs it.

[quote=thistle]One woman wrote to me:

"I’ve found in my experience that the practices in divers RC church vary. A Methodist, I’ve been in RC churches that welcomed me to take the Eucharist and some who did not.
[/quote]

The Catholic Church is not that diverse!!

[quote=thistle]Some members of my family and friends who married Roman Catholics were asked to be re-baptized before their children could be christened in the RC church. Some were not asked to be re-baptized. I look at all of this as squabbles in the Christian family. We still love one another".

What’s going on here? :confused:
[/quote]

Who’s doing the squabbling?


#4

[quote=Paris Blues]I know this but want to double check.

Is it so true that if you’re NOT Catholic that you CANNOT participate in the Eucharist? For example, if you’re married to a Catholic and attend Mass with them, only they can recieve the Eucharist and the non-Catholic can’t, correct?
[/quote]

Generally, this is correct.

Some have told me that they DON’T agree that non-Catholics can’t take the Eucharist

Well, most of them do not believe that this is the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ. That alone is a disqualifier. When we say “Amen” we affirm that we believe and profess all that the Catholic Church believes and teaches.

Another one told me, regarding the Eucharist to non-Catholics, …“if you are a child of God the table should be open. It is my prayer that eventually that will be worked out but for now it is as it is.”

I find it amusing that people who reject the teaching of the Catholic Church – people who do not even really *know *why the Church teaches as she does – feel that they have a right to any opinion at all. What is “a child of God?” For Pete’s sake! A Hindu is a Child of God! Should he receive the Eucharist?

They also told me that the CC DOESN’T recognize a Methodist baptism. I told them they recognize a valid baptism from another Christian denomination…I remember also hearing this from another group…that one that I had to leave that is. I don’t know where these people are hearing this from!

Paris, you now have access to the *Catechism of the Catholic Church *on line – I know; I gave you the link. You can look it up and share the appropriate quotation with your friends.

One woman wrote to me:

“I’ve found in my experience that the practices in divers RC church vary. A Methodist, I’ve been in RC churches that welcomed me to take the Eucharist and some who did
not. Some members of my family and friends who married Roman Catholics were asked to be re-baptized before their children could be christened in the RC church. Some were not asked to be re-baptized. I look at all of this as squabbles in the Christian family. We still love one another”.

While the Church recognizes “valid” baptisms, there are some denominations and cults (LDS, JWs, certain Pentecostals who baptize only in the name of Jesus; nowadays people even from mainstream denominations who should have valid baptism may have been baptized in some formula, such as “Creator, Redeemer, Sanctifier” rather than “Father, Son and Holy Spirit” which would make the baptism invalid) do not have valid baptism, so these people must be baptized validly. Others by some fluke may have invalidated what should have been acceptable (Creator, Redeemer, Sanctifier people e.g.), thus, the Catholic Church may have conditionally baptized a person whose baptism was questionable.

No RE-baptism is possible! The Church does not re-baptize. It wil baptize conditionally in cases where the original baptism is questionable.


#5

[quote=vern humphrey]That’s correct. Look inside the front cover of your missal and you’ll see a discussion of who can and who cannot take communion. The Catholic Church welcomes Othodox Christians and a couple of other Churches, but no Protestant churches.

That’s a valid answer. Refer them to Canon 844. It spells out who can and who cannot take Communion.

Again, you’re correct – it is the method that makes baptism valid, not the person who performs it.

The Catholic Church is not that diverse!!

Who’s doing the squabbling?
[/quote]

Excuse me but none of these quoted posts are mine so why is my name against them!


#6

[quote=thistle]Excuse me but none of these quoted posts are mine so why is my name against them!
[/quote]

You’re right! They are not yours! They’re MINE!!! Hmmmm…


closed #7

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