Pragnancy and salvation


#1

I heard on a CD I have that women have an “edge” so to speak over men on salvation due to pregancy. It is because of the pain and suffering of labor and child birth. Is this true and where is it biblically? Actually I got into a debate and cannot find the CD where I origionally heard it so I can prove the point. Good possibility I will be eating crow:) Any help is appreciated.

Thanks

Eric


#2

Makes up somewhat for Eve.


#3

There is no need to look to the bible for specific quotes. Not everything was put in there. Merely look at Christ’s crucifixtion. He sufferd under the weight of the cross to bring into this world new life. Women suffer under the pangs of labor (and other things I am sure) to bring into this world a life.

Motherhood is a holy gift and precious. There is a book out called The Apostolate of Holy Motherhood you might wish to read. Also, here is a link about redemptive suffering.

http://www.rosary-center.org/ll49n2.htm

.


#4

[quote=echasel]I heard on a CD I have that women have an “edge” so to speak over men on salvation due to pregancy. It is because of the pain and suffering of labor and child birth. Is this true and where is it biblically? … Any help is appreciated.

[/quote]

Eric…Are you looking for 1Timothy 2: 13-15?

13 For Adam was formed first, then Eve. 14 Further, Adam was not deceived, but the woman was deceived and transgressed. 15 But she will be saved through motherhood, provided women persevere in faith and love and holiness, with self-control.


#5

IMHO, when St Paul writes that woman will be “saved through motherhood” he is referring to the Annunciation and Incarnation which is the beggining and foundation of our Redemption.


#6

Well, here is a quote about it from Fulton Sheen:

A woman is capable of more sacrifices than a man. Man is more apt to be a hero, through some great passionate outburst of heroism. But a woman’s love makes a thousand small sacrifices, sprinkling them through the days and the months; their very repetition gives them the character of the commonplace. Not only her soul, but her body, has some share in the Calvary of Redemption; furthermore, she comes closer to death than man, whenever she brings forth a child.— Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, Life is Worth Living


#7

I’m wondering though, where does this leave those of us who, for whatever reason, are not given the gift of children?


#8

[quote=CarolAnnSFO]I’m wondering though, where does this leave those of us who, for whatever reason, are not given the gift of children?
[/quote]

I am affraid I cannot give the full citation, but the Pope, in one of his recent letters on women, described their motherhood in deeper terms than strictly biological. The catechism may even be considered to provide a similar commentary when it states:

“Spouses to whom God has not granted children can nevertheless have a conjugal life full of meaning, in both human and Christian terms. Their marriage can radiate a fruitfulness of charity, of hospitality, and of sacrifice.” (CCC 1654)


#9

I would say that physical motherhood is an opportunity for a woman to unite her sufferings with Christ’s, but it is up to her to be open to the grace God offers her through the gift of motherhood. For those who are not physically mothers, God will give ample opportunities for them to grow in holiness, and they can obviously still offer up their sufferings and unite them with Christ’s. Being a biological mother may be a wonderful opportunity for a woman to experience redemptive suffering, but it is certainly not the only opportunity.


#10

[quote=CarolAnnSFO]I’m wondering though, where does this leave those of us who, for whatever reason, are not given the gift of children?
[/quote]

We women (children or not) by nature generally (far more often than not) are nurturing and willing to give of ourselves without recompense. Part of how we define ourselves is through who needs us and what we can give to them for their benefit and betterment. This happens in the home, on the job, everywhere! Men give of themselves as well, but as noted elsewhere–credit is given to them for their selflessness–they are honored and respected for doing good (thus they get some recompense)–this selflessness is expected of women and we provide. Of course there are exceptions to the rule…but…That may sound sexist to men (and some women)-- so be it–it’s true.


closed #11

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