Prayers to Angels


#1

On another forum, someone mentioned that they pray regularly to the usual Trinity, Mary, the other saints and… angels.

I’ve rarely ever heard of the notion of praying to angels. I’m led to understand that angels are servants of God, while the saints act as intermediaries on our behalf (if we ask them).

My questions:

  1. Is it appropriate for us to pray for the intercession of the angels?
  2. Do any of you do it? If so, could you give an example of what form that prayer would take, if any?

Thanks in advance.


#2

I would have thought it would be acceptable - the Prayer of Saint Michael is quite well known and was for a long while directed to be prayed after Mass, if memory serves.


#3

True, but I think you’re referring to Saint Michael, as opposed to the archangel Michael.

Big difference: the 24 St Michaels were men who died and whose souls reside in Heaven; the archangel has never died (never been human, in fact) and has existed, probably, since prehuman times.

Thanks for the reply.


#4

Hi, angels are messengers of God, created to worship him and to help us carry out His will. We do not worship angels, but it is good to ask for their help. They are waiting for us to ask.

Peter Kreeft has a great overview of angels:

peterkreeft.com/topics/angels.htm

Here is a prayer from Lorna Byrne’s website, from the Archangel Michael.

Pour out, Thy Healing Angels,
Thy Heavenly Host upon me,
And upon those that I love,
Let me feel the beam of Thy
Healing Angels upon me,
The light of Your Healing Hands.
I will let Thy Healing begin,
Whatever way God grants it,
Amen.’


#5

There is a duly approved prayer given, in English, as an example in the Manual of Indulgences [Enchiridion Indulgentiarum] (1999) published by USCCB, with partial indulgence:

Angele Dei

Angel of God, my guardian dear, to whom his love entrusts me here, enlighten and guard, rule and guide me. Amen.

Here is a Latin version:

Ángele Dei, qui custos es mei, me, tibi commíssum pietáte supérna, illúmina, custódi, rege et gubérna. Amen.

Pope John Paul II recommended the prayer (of Pope Leo XIII, 1896) to St. Michael in Regina Coeli April 24, 1994, which some say after the Rosary:

Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray; and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the divine power of God, cast into hell Satan, and all evil spirits who wander now throughout your world seeking the ruin of souls.

Also September 29th is the Feast of Saint Michael, Saint Gabriel, and Saint Raphael
Archangels

Guardian Angels Memorial is October 2nd

Angels are mentioned in the Bible:

Raphael (Tobit Chapter 12)
Gabriel (Daniel 8:16; 9:21; Luke 1:19, 26) and Michael (Daniel 10:13, 21; 12:1; Jude 1:9; Rev 12:7).


#6

Gee, I hope its okay…because I just prayed the Litany of the Holy Angels last night.:wink:


#7

St. Josemaria Escriva, founder of Opus Dei, strongly recommended that people pray to their guardian angels for temporal and spiritual favors, and also for assistance in dealing with people in work and apostolate.

I ask my angel to help me in danger, to overcome temptation, to find the right words, to find parking spaces, and to work with the angels of people I am praying for. My angel is a great help.

Betsy


#8

yes, it is appropriate to pray to the Angels :slight_smile: all prayers eventually go to God, and when we talk with the Angels, are are just asking them to help us etc. We can pray to our Guardian Angel, because they’re always with us. We can also pray to known angels like St Michael, St Gabriel, and St Raphael.

here are some examples, but there are many others including litanies, novenas, etc
catholic.org/saints/anglpray.php

the St Michael prayer is indeed directed to St Michael the Archangel (who is also called ‘Saint’, though he’s an Angel)


#9

Ah, well, that was the sticking part in my reasoning: you’re all saying Saint Michael in reference to the angel.


#10

Just curious, who are the 24 St. Michaels?


#11

prayerchanges, the 24 are probably the 24 Elders below St. Michael that are mentioned in the Mozarabic Brevary. (The Roman Catholic, Mozarabic liturgy is used mainly in Toledo Spain.) The 24 Elders are in Revelations (Apocalypse) 4:4

And round about the throne were four and twenty seats; and upon the seats, four and twenty ancients sitting, clothed in white garments, and on their heads were crowns of gold.


#12

here are lots of prayers to Guardian Angels :slight_smile:
2heartsnetwork.org/guardian.htm


#13

Here is the list I got from Catholic.org. I note now that some of them are “blessed”–I guess that means Saints-in-waiting.
And here’s the settling point for me: one of them is Saint Michael the Archangel. Gabriel is also listed as a saint, and, presumably the other archangels would be.
There you have it.

Further question: If we discovered the names of ordinary angels, they would presumably be listed as “Saint (whomever)”–is that reasonable to assume?


#14

I read that the Vatican said that we only know the names of these 3 Angels from Scripture…

if however we did know the names of other Angels…sorry I don’t know if they’d be called “Saint” too… no idea!!


#15

In the Revelation of Esdras, the angels ruling at the end of the world are these nine:

Michael, Gabriel, Uriel, Raphael, Gabuthelon, Beburos, Zebuleon, Aker, and Arphugitonos.

This scripture is not accepted by all.


#16

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