Prayers to Mary


#1

Interesting question: Must our prayers to Mary be audible, or can they be said in our minds?:hmmm:

If we ask for her prayers in our mind silently, does that then mean she can read our thoughts, and read our minds? That seems reserved for a divine being, so what is it, audible or not audible?

Mary was taken into heaven body and soul, so does that mean her ears can still still hear?:ehh:

I dunno why I ask, just curious.


#2

…i guess it doesn’t matter. Do people without the ability to vocalize their prayers mean they can’t pray…

…i think not… :thumbsup:


#3

The question really I think is what are the capabilities of those in heaven. That Mary would need to hear audible prayers with her physical ears (which I am sure she can) implies that those who have not had their bodies resurrected have no hearing and live in silence. They hear I think but not with ears. How is it that satan influences. It is not by speach. In some way he has the ability to put thought in to our minds. It is a power of the spirit it seems to me to be able to do this. It is a power which we do not realize in our physical bodies. But I do think that our spirits do communicate unknown to us. For it says that the angels rejoice in heaven over the repentence of one repentent sinner. Yet angels do not have physical ears and their is nothing that says that our repentence is out loud. It may be that God let’s the angels know what is on the mind of the sinner. They have complete access to him and so he can let them know what he wants them to know. This applies to Mary as well. I have heard that mind to mind communication is possible in heaven.

Just some random thoughts I have had on this issue.


#4

2673 In prayer the Holy Spirit unites us to the person of the only Son, in his glorified humanity, through which and in which our filial prayer unites us in the Church with the Mother of Jesus.

2674 Mary gave her consent in faith at the Annunciation and maintained it without hesitation at the foot of the Cross. Ever since, her motherhood has extended to the brothers and sisters of her Son "who still journey on earth surrounded by dangers and difficulties. Jesus, the only mediator, is the way of our prayer; Mary, his mother and ours, is wholly transparent to him: she “shows the way” (hodigitria), and is herself “the Sign” of the way, according to the traditional iconography of East and West.

2675 Beginning with Mary’s unique cooperation with the working of the Holy Spirit, the Churches developed their prayer to the holy Mother of God, centering it on the person of Christ manifested in his mysteries. In countless hymns and antiphons expressing this prayer, two movements usually alternate with one another: the first “magnifies” the Lord for the “great things” he did for his lowly servant and through her for all human beings, the second entrusts the supplications and praises of the children of God to the Mother of Jesus, because she now knows the humanity which, in her, the Son of God espoused.

2676 This twofold movement of prayer to Mary has found a privileged expression in the Ave Maria:
Hail Mary: the greeting of the angel Gabriel opens this prayer. It is God himself who, through his angel as intermediary, greets Mary. Our prayer dares to take up this greeting to Mary with the regard God had for the lowliness of his humble servant and to exult in the joy he finds in her.
Full of grace, the Lord is with thee: These two phrases of the angel’s greeting shed light on one another. Mary is full of grace because the Lord is with her. The grace with which she is filled is the presence of him who is the source of all grace. "Rejoice . . . O Daughter of Jerusalem . . . the Lord your God is in your midst.’ Mary, in whom the Lord himself has just made his dwelling, is the daughter of Zion in person, the ark of the covenant, the place where the glory of the Lord dwells. She is “the dwelling of God . . . with men.” Full of grace, Mary is wholly given over to him who has come to dwell in her and whom she is about to give to the world.
Blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. After the angel’s greeting, we make Elizabeth’s greeting our own. “Filled with the Holy Spirit,” Elizabeth is the first in the long succession of generations who have called Mary “blessed.”] “Blessed is she who believed…” Mary is “blessed among women” because she believed in the fulfillment of the Lord’s word. Abraham. because of his faith, became a blessing for all the nations of the earth.Mary, because of her faith, became the mother of believers, through whom all nations of the earth receive him who is God’s own blessing: Jesus, the “fruit of thy womb.”

2677 Holy Mary, Mother of God: With Elizabeth we marvel, "And why is this granted me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?"Because she gives us Jesus, her son, Mary is Mother of God and our mother; we can entrust all our cares and petitions to her: she prays for us as she prayed for herself: "Let it be to me according to your word.] By entrusting ourselves to her prayer, we abandon ourselves to the will of God together with her: "Thy will be done."
Pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death: By asking Mary to pray for us, we acknowledge ourselves to be poor sinners and we address ourselves to the “Mother of Mercy,” the All-Holy One. We give ourselves over to her now, in the Today of our lives. And our trust broadens further, already at the present moment, to surrender “the hour of our death” wholly to her care. May she be there as she was at her son’s death on the cross. May she welcome us as our mother at the hour of our passing to lead us to her son, Jesus, in paradise.

2678 Medieval piety in the West developed the prayer of the rosary as a popular substitute for the Liturgy of the Hours. In the East, the litany called the Akathistos and the Paraclesis remained closer to the choral office in the Byzantine churches, while the Armenian, Coptic, and Syriac traditions preferred popular hymns and songs to the Mother of God. But in the Ave Maria, the theotokia, the hymns of St. Ephrem or St. Gregory of Narek, the tradition of prayer is basically the same.

2679 Mary is the perfect Orans (pray-er), a figure of the Church. When we pray to her, we are adhering with her to the plan of the Father, who sends his Son to save all men. Like the beloved disciple we welcome Jesus’ mother into our homes, for she has become the mother of all the living. We can pray with and to her. The prayer of the Church is sustained by the prayer of Mary and united with it in hope.


#5

God can empower Mary and the saints to be aware of the prayers that are directed to them.


#6

I always figured in Heaven all things are possible :slight_smile:


#7

[quote=mommy]I always figured in Heaven all things are possible :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Good thought! :slight_smile:


#8

[quote=thessalonian]The question really I think is what are the capabilities of those in heaven. That Mary would need to hear audible prayers with her physical ears (which I am sure she can) implies that those who have not had their bodies resurrected have no hearing and live in silence.
[/quote]

First I would say that the saints who have not yet received their glorified bodies are still able to hear in the sense that Beethoven was still able to “hear” his music after he became deaf. In addition, I would say that God enables them to miraculously be able to hear in the normal sense (except more robustly) – just as God enables them to miraculously be able to see. I highly doubt that the saints in heaven are blind and deaf. While presently their sight and hearing takes place miraculously, after the general resurrection, they would take place with their eyes and ears as they do now with Mary (and Jesus).

But I do think that our spirits do communicate unknown to us.

I think that our spirits would communicate with other spirits in a spiritual, non-coroporeal way, only when the communication is willed, either explicitly or implicitly. I don’t think that the secrets of our hearts would be made known against our will. In Heaven, of course, everything is known to all as it is everyone’s will in Heaven to share everything.

For it says that the angels rejoice in heaven over the repentence of one repentent sinner. Yet angels do not have physical ears and their is nothing that says that our repentence is out loud.

You don’t need to have ears and eyes to be able to see and hear. God has no eyes yet He sees all – more clearly and vividly than anyone. And even in human life, if you lose your eyes to an accident you are still able to see things in your mind and imagination (ex. when you dream). The material (corporeal) is actually a lower form of existence than the immaterial (spiritual) and so angels – who are, like God, pure spirits – are able to access and process in their minds even more clearly and vividly than we, all the material data that makes up our sensory experiences.

Even though a particular sinner may not verbalize his repentance, the angels would still be able to tell apart from telepathic communication, from other external things the sinner does (such as making an appointment to go to confession or facial expressions, etc.)

It may be that God let’s the angels know what is on the mind of the sinner.

IMO, if the sinner wills, implicitly or explicitly, that the angels know what he is thinking, the angels would be able to directly know that information.

I have heard that mind to mind communication is possible in heaven.

That has to be how angels communicate with each other because angels are pure spirits – thus any communication among them has to be spiritual and non-material in nature.

Regardless, I am certain that if one prays with the intention that the prayer be known to a saint or angel in Heaven that by whatever means (direct, mediated by beatific vision, etc.) that saint or angel will know the prayer.


#9

I think the problem comes from putting human earthly limitations on those in Heaven.


#10

Tuapolo,

Is there somewhere we disagree? Did you have a problem with my post?


#11

[quote=mommy]I think the problem comes from putting human earthly limitations on those in Heaven.
[/quote]

1Cor.2

[list=1]
]9] But, as it is written, "What no* eye has** seen, nor ear heard,
nor the heart of man conceived,
what God has prepared for those who love him,"
[/list]


closed #12

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