Praying in Latin?

Do any of you pray the basic prayers in Latin??

As a way of dedication to the beautiful language of the church and to mark me as a distinct Catholic, I pray the rosary and the basic prayers in Latin as much as possible (the rosary is less quick in Latin, but I still seem to manage to speak quite quickly :o )

I was quite proud that I learned the Benedic, Domine before meals! :bounce:

Until I take formal Latin classes and attend a TLM, I bind myself to praying formal prayers in Latin and personal ones in any other language.

How about all of you? I’m curious!

After Latin in high school and in college, I could not converse in it (neither could my classmates) as we learned it as a translated language.

The only one I have done is the Ave Maria. I have been learning to play the Gounad version accompaniment on the harp, and so learned the words (or re-learned I should say - I’m pretty sure I learned them as a child when the Mass was still said in Latin, but I didn’t remember it). I sometimes say it during the Rosary, but I am still slow and have to stop and remember all of the words. I love the sound of Latin prayers though, and would like to learn some of the other prayers as well.

As a Barney Catechism era convert, I didn’t learn any Latin prayers. Heck they didn’t even teach me the Hail Mary.

But that has changed for me. I ended up on a mission to learn Ecclesial Latin. I have the Ave Maria – and can sing Bach-Gonoud and Schubert’s version of the prayer, too.

O Salutaris Hostia, Tantum Ergo Sacramentum, and Ubi Caritas are part of my musical reproitoire.
I can read the Pater Noster, Anima Christi, and say the Gloria Patria. I am aiming to recite all the above and more. I practice when I can, but two young boys, keep me hopping.

I think we all need to learn some of the Ecclesial Latin. When we visited Cancun, I wished the litrugy had been in Latin, I could have been more in sync with it all.

My kids are learning Latin at school and part of the curriculum is to learn the basic prayers. I am trying to learn along with them.

BTW, The Thesaurus Precum Latinarum (Treasury of Latin Prayers) is a wonderful resource. :thumbsup:

tee

My kids are learning Latin at school and part of the curriculum is to learn the basic prayers. I am trying to learn along with them.

I wanted the practice so I started to say the basic prayers of the rosary in Latin.

web.carroll.edu/msmillie/rosarylatin.htm

Then I decided to start trying some others and found a fountain of prayers at this site (edit: Oops - same link as provided in the above post).

preces-latinae.org/index.htm

I am finding that comprehension is beginning to take place as I learn vocabulary. I have found myself actually translating pieces subconsciously as certain words repeat themselves in other prayers and I make those associations, along with having known the prayer my entire life.

This same thing happened to me in another language when I lived in a foreign language. The more time I spend in it, the more I begin to comprehend, even if not being able to speak.

Here is one with recordings to help with pronounciation

trosch.org/chu/latin-prayers.html

I truly believe that when so many young people, born after V-II, want to pray or learn latin, it is being guided by the Holy Spirit. I believe the Lord wants this beautiful language of our Church preserved.

I was only 16 years old and got a whim to try to learn Latin. I picked up a Latin book and over the next few weeks attempted to learn, but the book was not good for self teaching. I’ve since found some and even online stuff that helps, provided by others when I asked for resources.

latin-mass-society.org/simplicissimus/index.htm

One goal I have is to start and end my confession with Latin. I have the Act of Contrition, but need to learn how to say,

“Father forgive me, for I have sinned…” or comparable.

Anyone know?

Diane

Diane,

I agree strongly with you. At first I didn’t know which word was which, but as I kept at it, I now know some of the vocabulary and the different endings based on the different uses of the words in different prayers.

Sincerely, I wouldn’t mind our parish being more like the Mass on EWTN – it would allow more people to participate in the Liturgy even if they can’t comprehend the homily.

There is something poetic, holy and sacred in the Latin prayers and hymns.

The thesaurus was most helpful to me. The webmaster assures me that if one doesn’t learn Latin on Earth, that we will learn it in purgatory. :wink:

I wish the Cathedral singers hadn’t rephrased the Ave Maria by Schubert, but their cd of Catholic Latin Classics is a wonderful and beautifully done compilation of twenty some songs.

The Sublime Chant series has too much phony echo for me. I understand the desired effect, but the effect gets in the way of the music. If I could edit the reverb out, I would be happier with CD.

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam!
To the greater Glory of God!

I absolutely love the Latin language, but do not know it very well. Thus, I’ve try to learn in Latin only those prayers that I know in English like the back of my hand. This way, as I’m praying the Latin, I still know what I’m praying :slight_smile:

I’ve tried blending the Liturgy of the Hours this way too. I’ll do the antiphons, readings, intentions, et cetera, in English but the common prayers that never change in Latin.

There just something about Latin that makes the prayers so much more beautiful…

[quote=tee_eff_em]BTW, The Thesaurus Precum Latinarum (Treasury of Latin Prayers) is a wonderful resource. :thumbsup:

tee
[/quote]

Great website! This is where I learned the Hail Mary, Our Father, and Gloria. Hoping to memorize more. I just need to take the time.

My father thought it was important that we learn the traditional prayers of the Church in both Latin and English, we used to pray the Rosary in both English and Latin.

I’ve since initiated that with my family.

Here is my son when he was 4

home.comcast.net/~bnewell100460/sounds/KieranAve.mp3

Brendan, how precious! He says it much better than I do!

Awwwww! That was sweet, Brendan!

Singing is praying twice, so singing in Mass is praying Latin, so yes I do pray in Latin. I would like more to know more Latin prayers tough, someday maybe.

Last night I said a Rosary and I said the last decade and a couple of the ending prayers in Latin. I think it helps you think about what they’re saying more if you have to think past what you’re saying to what you mean.

Ave Maria, Gratia Plena, Dominus Tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae.

As for going to a Latin Mass, the nearest church to where I live where a Latin Mass is said (according to masstimes.org) is about a hundred miles away. That’s a bit out of reach for me. Maybe I could convince my family to go on a road trip…

Veni Sancte Spiritus
-ACEGC

As a Byzantine Catholic, I grew up with Church Slavonic as the mother tongue of our Liturgy, much like many of you Westerners grew up with Latin as the language of the Mass. I recall as a kid that as my contemporaries at St. Cyril’s Roman Catholic Church across the tracks were learning their Pater Noster, I was learning my Otce Nas.

To this day, my daily prayer practice includes both English and Church Slavonic. In fact, when I visit the graves of my Ruthenian ancestors, I always pray in Church Slavonic, figuring that they would not have understood the English prayers anyway! :smiley:

“Imnja Otca, i Syna, i Svjataho Ducha. Amin.”

To this day, my daily prayer practice includes both English and Church Slavonic. In fact, when I visit the graves of my Ruthenian ancestors, I always pray in Church Slavonic, figuring that they would not have understood the English prayers anyway! :smiley:

“Imnja Otca, i Syna, i Svjataho Ducha. Amin.”
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Lipsche hovoriti "Vo imya Otca i Syna i Svyataho Dukha. Amin’.
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I think many need a “sacred” language to pray different from commercial every-day language. Latin for Roman Catholics, Church Slavonic for Orthodox and Eastern Catholics. Agree that the beauty of Otche Nash during Divine Liturgy in parish church is fond memory. Good to pray as you ancestors praying also.
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Whe I really want to concentrate on saying the Rosary, I will say it in Latin as I really have to concentrate on the words.

I love the Rosary in Latin! I love praying the Rosary in Latin when I have the time. It’s intresting that when I pray in Latin it almost always comes out lyrically I absolutly love the language.

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