Prayng for people during General Intentions/Prayer of the Faithful

My parish has recently stopped mentioning parishoners who are seriously ill during the General Intentions/Prayer of the Faithful of the Mass. Recently 2 members of our congregation have become gravely ill and I asked if they could be mentioned during this part of the Mass but I was told it isn't proper do and that's what the prayer chain is for. Is this correct? Doesn't seem right to me but I could very well be wrong.

Thank you.

we mention "all the members of the parish who are ill" but not by name..
HOWEVER the names of those who are ill (and wish to be listed) are listed in the parish bulletin!

as far as i know its a matter of time we are a big parish.

specific mention of names (other than "Benedict our Pope, and Justin our Bishop") are usually limited to whoever has the Mass being said for them that day....
and that is something that you usually sign up for (and pay a small stipend for) at the parish office.....

We don't mention the names of the ill during that time. Just the recently deceased and the intention of the Mass. We list the names of the sick in the Parish Bulletin.

and bear in mind if you list 10 sick people by name, somebody is going to be hurt because his sick relative was not mentioned (because he did not call the office and the staff can't read minds) so an individual prayer is by nature exclusive, and the prayer of the faithful is supposed to be inclusive

There's a few issues that crop up with this.

One is that the list can get quite long depending on the demographics of the parish.

Another is that sometimes well meaning individuals put someone's name on the list and then the parish gets a phone call from the sick person or their family upset that they were mentioned at mass. Some people/families are very private about illnesses.

Furthermore, collecting the names can sometimes be problematic. People can get upset if their name isn't one the list even if no one told the parish or perhaps it was submitted too late for that weekend.

Those are the basic reasons why many parishes only do a general prayer for the sick in the prayer of the faithful.

That is so true, Father. What a lot of parishes do is list the names of the sick in the bulletin. You probably already do this. In our area, one of the local hospitals will sometimes send a fax to the parishers of their patients. These names are then placed in the bulletin.

Sick are listed in the bulletin.

Intentions are more "general" - something like "for all the sick in our parish, we pray to the Lord" could be added.

The names of those who have died in the past week are announced before Mass when the announcements are on. They go "Please remember in your prayers all those who have died this past week...[names]...."

[quote="NewEnglandPries, post:5, topic:182864"]
There's a few issues that crop up with this.

One is that the list can get quite long depending on the demographics of the parish.

Another is that sometimes well meaning individuals put someone's name on the list and then the parish gets a phone call from the sick person or their family upset that they were mentioned at mass. Some people/families are very private about illnesses.

Furthermore, collecting the names can sometimes be problematic. People can get upset if their name isn't one the list even if no one told the parish or perhaps it was submitted too late for that weekend.

Those are the basic reasons why many parishes only do a general prayer for the sick in the prayer of the faithful.

[/quote]

In regards to list length, I'm talking about those who are gravely ill, meaning they would appear to have only a few days to live. That list seemingly wouldn't be very long. While you most certainly have good points, in my experience those who have family members who are ill to that extent don't mind them being mentioned at Mass and I would assume permission would be given by the immediate family before doing so anyway.

All that being said, it seems to me my original question really hasn't been answered. Is it improper to do this or is simply not advised?

Ron

[quote="benedictgal, post:6, topic:182864"]
That is so true, Father. What a lot of parishes do is list the names of the sick in the bulletin. You probably already do this. In our area, one of the local hospitals will sometimes send a fax to the parishers of their patients. These names are then placed in the bulletin.

[/quote]

If a hospital is doing this without getting permission of the patient or family, I believe it is a violation of HIPPA regulations. The best thing to do is for the patient, or a family member, with the patient's permission, to call the parish.

[quote="CB_Catholic, post:10, topic:182864"]
If a hospital is doing this without getting permission of the patient or family, I believe it is a violation of HIPPA regulations. The best thing to do is for the patient, or a family member, with the patient's permission, to call the parish.

[/quote]

While it is not my favorite hospital, when I was in the ER and getting checked in, the in-take person asked me what my denomination was, where my parish was and which priest I wanted to have come and see me. My dad was out of town, and, since I am only child, I pretty much had to fend for myself. Furthermore, they asked if I wanted them to send the information to my parish. Given that I only stayed there for 10 hours (it took them a long enough time to find my veins), I told them that unless I was going to stay there overnight, they did not have to bother with it. But, they do ask, just the same.

[quote="benedictgal, post:11, topic:182864"]
While it is not my favorite hospital, when I was in the ER and getting checked in, the in-take person asked me what my denomination was, where my parish was and which priest I wanted to have come and see me. My dad was out of town, and, since I am only child, I pretty much had to fend for myself. Furthermore, they asked if I wanted them to send the information to my parish. Given that I only stayed there for 10 hours (it took them a long enough time to find my veins), I told them that unless I was going to stay there overnight, they did not have to bother with it. But, they do ask, just the same.

[/quote]

That is the important thing, they asked. When I used to do hospital visits for my parish, before HIPPA, the hospital would keep a list in the Pastoral Care Department with people's names on it and their parish. We would then pick up these lists when we went to visit. They were generated from the admitting department. Now patients and their families have to call the parish if they are admitted and want a visit from someone from the parish. So now they put in the bulletin that if you or a loved one is in the hospital and want a visit, please call the parish. Well, people often forget to call or don't realize they need to, and get upset when no one from the parish visits. I had surgery last year and had to stay in the hospital, and my husband did not call my parish and I forgot to tell him to in my anxiety. So...no visit :(

The hospital also hires a Catholic priest to provide pastoral care services. After Mass, the deacon, who also works at the hospital, gives the priest a list of the Catholic patients and he goes and visits them, annointing them, hearing their confessions, giving them Holy Communion, or just simply letting them know he is there. The hospital used to be owned by a religious order, but, they sold it. It still has a chapel with Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament for 12 hours a day, except during the Triduum.

[quote="benedictgal, post:6, topic:182864"]
. In our area, one of the local hospitals will sometimes send a fax to the parishers of their patients.

[/quote]

For some reason, in New England, that's considered by hospitals to be a violation of HIPAA. Hospitals refuse to give out any information.

EDITED: Nevermind, already addressed in this thread...

[quote="LighthouseRon, post:9, topic:182864"]
In regards to list length, I'm talking about those who are gravely ill, meaning they would appear to have only a few days to live. That list seemingly wouldn't be very long.

[/quote]

Well, once again, still problematic since how do we ascertain how ill someone is? And then there's the guaranteed response of, "So my mother has to be dying before you'll pray for her?!"

While you most certainly have good points, in my experience those who have family members who are ill to that extent don't mind them being mentioned at Mass and I would assume permission would be given by the immediate family before doing so anyway.

For starters, you would be assuming too much. Well intentioned people sometimes don't bother to ask first.
And privacy means a lot to some, for example, every now and then I preside at funerals where the obituary isn't published until the day after the funeral. Some families want their funerals to be "by invitation only."

All that being said, it seems to me my original question really hasn't been answered. Is it improper to do this or is simply not advised?

I can't think of any liturgical regulation that would outright forbid it. But, in my opinion, its ill advised, atleast in some parishes.

In the TLM, just after the beginning of the Canon, the laity is invited to silently mention the names of the person(s) and the intentions for which you offer the
Divine Victim. The attendent prayer, (the commemoration of the living) is:

‘Be mindful, O Lord, of Thy servants and handmaidens, (name) and (name), and of all here present, whose faith and devotion are known unto Thee, for whom we offer, or who offer up to thee, this sacrifice of praise for themselves, their families and friends, for the redemption of their souls, for the health and salvation they hope for; and who now pay their vows to Thee, the everlasting, living and true God.’

This should suffice unless you believe that efficacy depends on numbers and being audibly expressed.

In our parish we list the names in the bulletin -- at least one name has been there since I came here 12 years ago. This person is at Mass almost every day and does work for the parish. I still haven't figured out what's wrong with him or why he hasn't requested that his name come off the list.

Even if it's just before Mass, if a family member requests to have a sick person's name mentioned in the general intercessions, the first reader makes a note of it and adds the name when he/she is reading the intentions. We only do it at the family's request (privacy) and they are only mentioned once -- then their name is added to the bulletin.

We do the same for the recently deceased. But as with the sick, they get upset if their mother dies and is not mentioned at all, even if they flew out to the funeral and never bothered to notify the parish of the death. I'm good but I don't read minds. Let's face it, when you are not always at Mass on Sunday due to travel and work commitments, we won't assume that your absence on a particular Sunday is due to the death of your mother.

We also have a book for prayer intentions which we keep in the narthex. Anyone who has a special intention for us to pray for may enter the name or the intention and the last intention we say is:

"For our own personal intentions (pause) and for all the intentions entered in our book, we pray to the Lord:"

[quote="NewEnglandPries, post:15, topic:182864"]
Well, once again, still problematic since how do we ascertain how ill someone is? And then there's the guaranteed response of, "So my mother has to be dying before you'll pray for her?!"

For starters, you would be assuming too much. Well intentioned people sometimes don't bother to ask first.
And privacy means a lot to some, for example, every now and then I preside at funerals where the obituary isn't published until the day after the funeral. Some families want their funerals to be "by invitation only."

I can't think of any liturgical regulation that would outright forbid it. But, in my opinion, its ill advised, atleast in some parishes.

[/quote]

How could I be assuming too much if the information about the ill parishoner comes from the immediate family? And what would be the difference between a mention at Mass and a mention in the bulletin? Couldn't a family member get upset either way?

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