Pre-TLM

Does anyone know what form was used before the TLM was introduced at Trent? I am comparing the various liturgies that the Church has used and have a big hole between those listed in the ECF and the two most rescent forms.

Links would be helpful, Thanks

The “Tridentine” Mass was not introduced by Trent, in spite of its name. It was the Rite of Mass already in existence, which Trent codified.

latinmass.org/faq.html

What is the Tridentine Mass?

It’s the Mass used in the Catholic Church for almost 1500 years, until the introduction of the Mass of Pope Paul VI following the Second Vatican Council.

Why is it called the Tridentine Mass?

Because it was codified by the Council of Trent in the 16th century. But the Mass itself is far older than that. The Canon, or central part, of the Mass dates back to the time of St Gregory in the sixth century.

In 1570, Pope St Pius V - in his Papal Bull Quo Primum - said that priests could use the Tridentine rite forever, “without scruple of conscience or fear of penalty”.

Triumpha.

[quote=But for Grace]Does anyone know what form was used before the TLM was introduced at Trent? I am comparing the various liturgies that the Church has used and have a big hole between those listed in the ECF and the two most rescent forms.

Links would be helpful, Thanks
[/quote]

The form of liturgy that was used before Trent was the TLM. lol

Does anyone know what form was used before the TLM was introduced at Trent?

Latin Mass wasn’t introduced at Trent, it was around for a long period before that.

That’s why a lot of Latinphiles get a bit peevish at the Tridentine label placed on the liturgy, because it gives some folks (like you) the exact idea that Trent originated this mass.

I’m going to do this from memory so I’m going to be very general, but hopefully a little later with some review I’ll be able to give you more detailed information.

Prior to the Council of Trent there were several “Missals” and “Sacramentries” in use in the (Western) Latin Rite Church. One that sticks out in my mind was the Gallic Missal (which was highly influenced by the Court of Charlesmange), and I believe there were other Missals in use in Germany and some areas of Italy and now that I think of it Spain - I think the area of Toledo - that was in use and very popular.

Just an aside, in your studies you might find it interesting of the German influence on the TLM, with its use of symbols (miter, crozzier). It was from Germany that we also find the alter being turned around to face the East, the introduction of Alter Rails and many other things we find in the TLM. Many of these symbols were adapted as the Papacy and Bishops were becoming more monarchical. And an irony of history, the Latin Rite became the Latin Rite (as oppose to the Eastern, Greek speaking rite) because from about the 3rd century, Latin had replaced Greek in the West as the common language, similar to what English is today through out the world. It truely was the venacular, but by the time of Trent it was used almost only in the Church and royal courts and was certainly not common language.

However, as was pointed out the essentials of the Mass had been codified and in use from atleast the 6th cent and perhaps as old as the 4th cent.

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[quote=But for Grace]Does anyone know what form was used before the TLM was introduced at Trent? I am comparing the various liturgies that the Church has used and have a big hole between those listed in the ECF and the two most rescent forms.

Links would be helpful, Thanks
[/quote]

I have a very detailed history that I present in RCIA of the first 600 years of the Church. It shows that the Mass took it’s form very early and was modified little by little over the centuries by adding this and that. There were no major changes except maybe the language from Greek to Latin. There were also some different liturgical Rites in the west other than the Roman Rite that developed.

The only completely new Mass formulary that was added after the Council of Trent was the last gospel.

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