Preaching the Gospel and Plagiarism


#1

Scenario:

A friend of yours is opposed to the Gospel message and has a lot of animosity toward “money-hungry preachers”, etc.

In the course of an email exchange, however, he says something that leads you to believe that with the right response, he might be persuaded to accept the Gospel.

And you know exactly where to find that response! Unfortunately, the stuff you have in mind was written by Billy Graham - someone whom your friend regularly makes fun of.

So, if you email the quote with attribution to Graham, your friend is sure to reject it, but if you send it as your own thought, he will read it and be converted.

And just to make this really challenging, timing is critical…doing a paraphrasing or re-write of Graham’s sermon is not an option because it would take to long to complete.

Question:

Do you email the plagiarized passage from Graham’s sermon to your friend without mentioning that it was written by him?


#2

Simply state, “I recall reading the following somewhere:” without attributing it to anyone…


#3

:thumbsup::thumbsup:
I do that all of the time; however, I usually really don’t remember where I’ve read the material and have to hunt it down!


#4

Do not email the plagiarized passage.

Think of the damage it will do to your yourself and especially to your friend when your friend does a search and finds that you are being a phoney and lying to them.

plagiarise (also -ize)
v.tr. ([also absol.)]

Take and use (the thoughts, writings, inventions, etc. of another person) as one’s own.
Pass off the thoughts etc. of (another person) as one’s own.

→ plagiariser n.


#5

Read it, say it in your own words. You post a lot here. You are more than capable of expressing yourself very well! :wink:

Be at peace.
God inspires us through many sources.


#6

What’s the term for the fallacy of dismissing a perfectly sound point because you don’t respect the source?

If I read Truth A and am struck by its truthfulness and pertinence, but I’m afraid that my conversation partners might summarily reject that truth if they knew the version I admired was proposed by Person B, I don’t mind conveying that same truth in my own words, for the sake of exposing them to that thought. So-and-so might have said “The sky is blue” or “It’s going to rain today” in a much catchier way, but the underlying truth is still the same truth-- and it’s my job to be able to understand it sufficiently well that I’m able to express it in my own way.


#7

Put the quoted material in quotation marks in the e-mail so he knows the information comes form somewhere else, but so that he can’t see who the word actually come from until he finishes the passage and scrolls down pat the view of the passage on the screen. Then, the person will be inspired by the words and realize after he has read it who has spoken them.

May God bless you and grant you inspiration for evangelization! :slight_smile:


closed #8

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