Precise Latin translations, please

  1. As an RCIA Candidate, my Church said it was OK for me to attend the “Tenebrae” Service on Wednesday, 4 April. What means “Tenebrae” and what would I be getting into?

  2. My RCIA Sponser gave me this pamphlet of prayers required daily for The Legion Of Mary Auxilliary members, called Legion Of Mary Tessera". What means "tessera?

  3. The middle section of this set of prayers is titled “The Catena Legionis”. I’m willing to venture that “Legionis” means “Legion”, leaving me scratching my head over “Catena”

  4. The cover of the pamphlet has two sentences

4A) INIMICITIAS PONAM INTER TE ET MULIEREMET SEMEN TUUM ET SEMENILLIUS IPSUM CONTERET CAPUT TUUM

4B) BEATA QUAE CREDIDIT MULIER ECCE FILIUS TUUS ECCE MATER TUA

Thank you in advance

  1. Darkness.
    Is this service at a Traditional church? Traditionally Tenebrae is the Matins and Lauds of Holy Thursday sung the evening before.

  2. I don’t know but I remember learning in History that mosaics were made of these tiny cube pieces. Probably wrong though.

  3. Chain of the Legion

  4. The verse from Genesis: I will put enemity between you and the woman, between your seed and her seed and he shall crush crush your head.

  5. I think you have to split it into two:
    Blessed (her) who believed- from the Visitation
    and: Woman, behold your Son. Behold your Mother.-the words of Christ on the cross

  1. Darkness.
    Is this service at a Traditional church? Traditionally Tenebrae is the Matins and Lauds of Holy Thursday sung the evening before.

  2. I don’t know but I remember learning in History that mosaics were made of these tiny cube pieces called tessera. Probably wrong :stuck_out_tongue: though the interpretation fits (sort of).

  3. Chain of the Legion

  4. The verse from Genesis: I will put enemity between you and the woman, between your seed and her seed and he shall crush crush your head.

  5. I think you have to split it into two:
    Blessed (her) who believed- from the Visitation
    and: Woman, behold your Son. Behold your Mother.-the words of Christ on the cross

Yup, that would seem to be it. Not traditional in the sense of using Latin, but probably with more traditions due to the large number of Hispanic members.

Thank for the other translations. They give me a better idea of what the Legion is about.

“Tessera” is Greek for “four.” And AJV is quite right–a mosaic piece, being a four-sided bit of glass more often than not, was called a “tessera.” but what context the current organisation’s using it in, I couldn’t tell you.

Can anybody translate the following INTO LATIN:

Here I am Lord

and

I come to do Your Will

Probably that the many Legion Of Mary groups and auxilliaries, scattered all over the world, form a mosaic of prayer and service to the Virgin?

The Catena Legionis makes sense also. Some people wear small chains to show themselves as slaves to Mary. This section sort of chains us all to Mary.

Mmmm … there’re a couple of ways to say that–how’s this?

“Ecce ego, Domine, venique voluntatem tuam confectum.”

Thank you very much :slight_smile:

Does anyone know if the original Hebrew uses a diminutive form of SEMENILLIUS like this text (which I assume is from the Vulgate) does?

Pretty good, actually, and nice poetry. I might have tried something like “secundum voluntatem tuam agam” but I’m not a Latin purist by any means.

Semenillius is actually two words - semen and illius meaning "her seed"
the tessera is the prayer leaflet we all use, specifically the picture on the front which figuratively one piece in a world wide mosaic composed of the tesserae of all the members.
Auxilliary members of the Legion of Mary say all the prayers on the tessera every day, (prayer to the Holy Spirit, the Rosary, The Catena or Magnificat, and the concluding prayer). This is a tremendous service to the work of the Legion and auxiliaries are highly valued for this.
I have been an active Legionary for about 4 years and find it a perfect synthesis of prayer and good works.
God bless you, Andruschak
Pat

Whoops–looking at your original post, I see you might have been asking for two separate translated phrases, in which case I did badly by translating the “and” in your post.

If you want the two to be separate phrases, drop the “-que” from “venique” and BACK SLOWLY AWAY FROM IT.

As independent phrases, they’d run:
“Ecce ego, Domine.”
“Veni voluntatem tuam confectum.”

Sorry 'bout the mix-up.

–“ROMANES EUNT DOMUS!” --B. Cohen, AD 33

No problemo mate!:thumbsup:

I asked and was told that “tessera” is a kind of military password.

A legionaiire was one of the most important factors in my conversion- but that’s another story I guess.

And ironically enough to “tessellate” a polygon is to split it into triangles.
Completely OT games programming point.

`

blush

And I do like the antiphon used…

Who is She that comes forth as the morning rising, fair as the moon, bright as the sun, terrible as an army set in battle array?

Now THIS is an antiphon. Not one to be recited politely while sitting down, or mumbled while kneeling. No, you want to stand up and shout it out in JOY!:extrahappy:

It’s a wonder more philologists don’t end up in straitjackets…

Can one of you please translate into Latin the following biblical passage:

Speak Lord for your servant heareth

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