Preistly Ceibacy


#1

I think preists should be celibit.


#2

As do I.

matthew


#3

Yes, for the most part.

Perhaps if enough esip. or anglican clergy switch over, I am open for them to be married.


#4

I believe that if a man is married he should still be allowed to enter into the priesthood.

However if a man is already a priest, he should not be allowed to marry.

and finally

If a married priest becomes a widower, he is not allowed to remarry.

That is what I believe.


#5

It never has been an either/or question in the Catholic Church, as the Catholic Church consists of more than just the Roman rite. The Eastern rites allow married clergy, and the Roman rite allows it in very limited circumstances. Originally the Roman rite had both a married and a celibate clergy.

The difficulty is that celibacy is its own charism, gift if you will, or its own vocation. Priesthood does not intrinsically require celibacy. If celibacy is so valuable to the priesthood, then making it optional and emphasizing its value should allow those who are called but married already to serve, while allowing those who are not married but called to also serve. Making it mandatory does not, in my mind, elevate the celibacy aspect of priesthood; it just makes it mandatory. It acts to exclude those who could be excellent priests on a basis that is not intrinsic to the priesthood.


#6

Recent studies show that celibacy goes back much farther than the usually acknowledged canonical sources would indicate, back to the second century. In the East, too, it was much more widespread than we have been able to realize up until now. In the East it isn’t until the seventh century that there is a parting of the ways. Today as before, monasticism in the East is still the foundation that sustains the priesthood and the hierarchy. In that sense, celibacy also has a very major significance in the East.

For, as a matter of fact, today we are experiencing not only violations of celibacy; marriage itself is becoming increasingly fragile as the basis of our society. In the legislation of Western nations we see how it is increasingly placed on the same level as other forms and is thereby largely “dissolved” as a legal form. Nor is the hard work needed really to live marriage negligible. Put in practical terms, after the abolition of celibacy we would only have a different kind of problem with divorced priests. That is not unknown in the Protestant Churches. In this sense, we see, of course, that the lofty forms of human existence involve great risks. The conclusion that I would draw from this, however, is not that we should now say, “We can’t do it anymore”, but that we must learn again to believe. And that we must also be even more careful in the selection of candidates for the priest hood. The point is that someone ought really to accept it freely and not say, well now, I would like to become a priest, so I’ll put up with this. Or: Well then, I’m not interested in girls anyway, so I’ll go along with celibacy. That is not a basis to start from. The candidate for the priesthood has to recognize the faith as a force in his life, and he must know that he can live celibacy only in faith. Then celibacy can also become again a testimony that says something to people and that also gives them the courage to marry. The two institutions are interconnected. If fidelity in the one is no longer possible, the other no longer exists: one fidelity sustains the other.

 **JOSEPH CARDINAL RATZINGER

catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0633.html**


#7

I am 18 years old and will be studying for the Priesthood next fall…I think that Priest ought to be celebate and suppose it was changed yesturday I would stay remain celebate as a Priest.


#8

[quote=fix] JOSEPH CARDINAL RATZINGER
catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0633.html

[/quote]

If I might be allowed to add some anecdotal comments here

I had thoughts about being a priest several times in my life. I did not however do so because I chose marriage. From my point of view that marriage required my close attention and would have inhibited me from carrying out my responsibilities to my flock.

I also had a numbr of Anglican friends some of who became ministers in that church. They found that the combination of marriage and ministry created special difficulties for them. First, it requires a special wife because she finds herself called will nilly to the ministry herself. If she is not prepared for or desirous of being a priests wife then the strain on the marriage becomes enourmous. Another friend who was married to an Orthodox priest ended up having an affair because she felt neglected as a result of his priestly duties.

While to us inside the Church it might seem a reasonable solution to the sex-abuse scandal we would do well to look at the problems that occur in those faiths that allow it before jumping in.

Lastly (for this post) The Holy Father is right. Celibacy was a normal part of Church doctrine going back to the very beginnings of the Church. During the Middle Ages the Papacy had to re-emphasise this over and over again, not because it was new, but because it was being ignored. The dangers that flowed from this ignoring of the discipline of the Church were shown again and again in the complaints to the Papacy about ignorant priests passing down the parish from father to son as though it was a trade leading to unsuitable, ill-educated priests more concerned with their own needs than those of their people.

Celibacy demands much but so does being a priest of Christ.


#9

[quote=last_niceguy]I am 18 years old and will be studying for the Priesthood next fall…I think that Priest ought to be celebate and suppose it was changed yesturday I would stay remain celebate as a Priest.
[/quote]

How wonderful that you have decided to answer God’s call. And, at such a young age. May God bless you!!!

I voted wholeheartedly - YES!!


#10

[quote=last_niceguy]I think that Priest ought to be celebate .
[/quote]

My best friend is a married priest, his brother is a priest, his sister is a nun…:clapping:

Oh, BTW, his father is a priest as was his grandfather…:clapping:

My parish had a 5th generation priest as pastor at one time…:clapping:


#11

I just gotta guess… But Anglican Church?


#12

[quote=CatholicCid]I just gotta guess… But Anglican Church?
[/quote]

Nope, Patchunky is a Catholic, a Byzantine-Ruthenian Catholic (like myself) if I am not mistaken.


#13

[quote=fix] JOSEPH CARDINAL RATZINGER
catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0633.html

[/quote]

Benedict XVI you mean :tsktsk: :tsktsk: :tsktsk: :bible1:


#14

[quote=CatholicCid]I just gotta guess… But Anglican Church?
[/quote]

:nope:

Nope…

I’m Byzantine Ruthenian-Rite Catholic.

My friend was ordained at the Russicum in Rome as was his brother.

His father was ordained at a kitchen table in the middle of the night in Ukriane when the Byzantine Rite was out-lawed.

His grandfather died in exile in Siberia…


#15

[quote=johnpaullover]Benedict XVI you mean :tsktsk: :tsktsk: :tsktsk: :bible1:
[/quote]

When he was interviewed he was not yet the Pope.


#16

[quote=fix] JOSEPH CARDINAL RATZINGER
catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0633.html

[/quote]

The Cardinal was speaking of the abolition of celibacy; and for the life of me, I can’t figure out who he is addressing, as I have never heard anyone propose that it be abolished.

I think it should be promoted; long loudly and with vigor.

But requiring it as an absolute is not promoting it, it is demanding it; and there is a world of difference.


#17

[quote=last_niceguy]I am 18 years old and will be studying for the Priesthood next fall…I think that Priest ought to be celebate and suppose it was changed yesturday I would stay remain celebate as a Priest.
[/quote]

And if you are called to be celibate, that is wonderful, as it is a charism and great witness.

However, not all who are called to the priesthood have that charism, as is obvious from the fact that the Catholic Church has numerous married priests, and the Roman rite has some.


#18

[quote=InnocentIII]If I might be allowed to add some anecdotal comments here

I had thoughts about being a priest several times in my life. I did not however do so because I chose marriage. From my point of view that marriage required my close attention and would have inhibited me from carrying out my responsibilities to my flock.

I also had a numbr of Anglican friends some of who became ministers in that church. They found that the combination of marriage and ministry created special difficulties for them. First, it requires a special wife because she finds herself called will nilly to the ministry herself. If she is not prepared for or desirous of being a priests wife then the strain on the marriage becomes enourmous. Another friend who was married to an Orthodox priest ended up having an affair because she felt neglected as a result of his priestly duties.

While to us inside the Church it might seem a reasonable solution to the sex-abuse scandal we would do well to look at the problems that occur in those faiths that allow it before jumping in.

Lastly (for this post) The Holy Father is right. Celibacy was a normal part of Church doctrine going back to the very beginnings of the Church. During the Middle Ages the Papacy had to re-emphasise this over and over again, not because it was new, but because it was being ignored. The dangers that flowed from this ignoring of the discipline of the Church were shown again and again in the complaints to the Papacy about ignorant priests passing down the parish from father to son as though it was a trade leading to unsuitable, ill-educated priests more concerned with their own needs than those of their people.

Celibacy demands much but so does being a priest of Christ.
[/quote]

There is no doubt that there are demands on a priest beyond the 40 hour work week. But so are there demands on doctors, lawyers, CPAs, business owners, middle and upper managers, and a whole host of other individuals who have demands from work far in excess of the 40 hour work week. the anecdotal evidence of marital problems runs throughout all of those positions. None of that necessitates a demand that one doing those things be celibate; but there most definitely is a demand that one find a balance between what one does and one’s marriage.

And the holy Father did not say that it is doctrine; but rather that it was practice going back to the earliest Church. It was and still is a discipline, or we would have no married priests at all.

And the issue about inheritance from priest to children was dealt with centuries ago.


#19

I do beleive that Priest should remain celibate. If one chooses to become a Priest then he should remain celibate as St. Paul strongly recommends. The Catholic Church teaches the requirement of celibacy has a discipline, which is not to be confussed with a doctrine. Angelican Priest who are married, if they become Catholic and become Caotholic Priest can continue to marry. But an Angelican priest who is not married and becomes a Catholic Priest cannot marry.


#20

alright, this is my first post. seems fitting that it is on this topic, seeing as that this is not a matter of having a spouse or not, having sex or not, having children or not. it is a matter of following the vatican in all orders of the faith. many do not know this but when you reject the catholic churches teachings, you are rejecting the apastolic authority that was handed down from our first pope, the rock of Christs church, Peter, as well as the other eleven that still reside in the church. Christ made a promise to our pope “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah, because flesh and blood have not revealed it to you, but my Father, who is in heaven. And I say to thee: That thou art Peter; and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven.”(Matt16:16-19)

so, what the pope teaches, we must follow, for what he binds on earth is also bound in heaven.
how much longer must I bare you?


please, pray that I may live up to my name.


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