President-elect Donald J. Trump will nominate Betsy DeVos as Education Secretary


#1

President-elect Donald J. Trump will nominate Betsy DeVos, a brilliant and passionate education advocate, as Education Secretary.
twitter.com/transition2017/status/801489495338188800


#2

Lansing — President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday said he intends to appoint West Michigan GOP mega donor and philanthropist Betsy DeVos to be his education secretary, putting an ardent supporter of school choice in charge of the nation’s education policy.

DeVos, 58, is seen as a national leader in the school choice movement, which she has called an attempt to “empower” parents to find good schools for their children, whether they be traditional public schools in other neighborhoods, charter schools, virtual schools or private institutions.

“Betsy DeVos is a brilliant and passionate education advocate,” Trump said Wednesday in a statement. “Under her leadership, we will reform the U.S. education system and break the bureaucracy that is holding our children back so that we can deliver world-class education and school choice to all families.”

Trump’s appointment of DeVos is subject to confirmation by the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate.

On Tuesday, former Washington, D.C., school chancellor Michelle Rhee took herself out of the running for education secretary, clearing the path for DeVos’ appointment.

In a statement, DeVos said she was honored to help Trump “make American education great again” — a play on Trump’s campaign slogan.

“The status quo in education is not acceptable,” DeVos said. “Together, we can work to make transformational change that ensures every student in America has the opportunity to fulfill his or her highest potential.”

detroitnews.com/story/news/politics/2016/11/23/trump-devos-education/94344918/


#3

It’s great that she is for school choice.


#4

He should just shut down the entire department. It’s proven to be nothing more than an unmitigated disaster


#5

She tweeted that she’s against common core. The pick has been solidified as a good one.


#6

Those two things you mentioned sound reassuring to me as well. Maybe more Catholic schools will feel empowered to let go of Common Core.


#7

Here is her statement about Common Core:

"Many of you are asking about Common Core. To clarify, I am not a supporter—period. Read my full stance, here: betsydevos.com/qa/ "


#8

power to the people… will see what changes come about in the new year.


#9

Amen to that!


#10

As a graduate of a private Catholic school whose mother paid both tuition and taxes for ‘government’ schools, I am totally opposed to tax dollars being spent on non-public schools. What made Catholic schools great is that they did not take money from the government. What made our country great is that we decided to educate everyone in the basics.

Everyone should be taught reading, writing, and arithmetic. Additionally, everyone should be taught basic economics and civics.

These, in my opinion , are basic right of all citizens and the responsibility of all governments (federal, state, and local).

I am afraid of where DeVos will lead us. Will Catholic schools become beholden to the government in search of money? Will public school students be left behind?

As a society, we need a well educated populace.


#11

Amen. I thought the Republicans wanted to shut down this and some of the other departments. Instead they perpetuate the bureaucracy.


#12

I’m with you. I went to Catholic schools all my life, and my children may go to Catholic schools (although we’d have to move to make that possible), or they may go to public school. Either way, I think “school choice” (aka “vouchers”) is a terrible idea, and will only lead to de-funding of public schools and the rise of operations designed to take advantage of parents and students.

I don’t like this at all.


#13

I would like to ask Catholics to think about school vouchers in a different way. Our parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents were proud to support both the public schools and our local parish schools. They understood the importance of education, whether it was non-Catholic or Catholic. Those who could not afford to send their children to their parish school were grateful for the public schools.

As for Common Core, God forbid our children should learn about mathematics, literature, or history.


#14

Common Core math is horrible; it has an unintended effect of dumbing kids down. Traditional ways of teaching have worked fine.


#15

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: I agree. I learned the basics just fine without Common Core. I try to help my grandson with his math now and I am thinking to myself how hard they are making it for these kids to get the same answer I get doing it the old fashioned way.
I remember in 7th grade or 8th grade in the 60’s we began modern math. it seems like they want to keep devising more difficult ways to solve a math problem.


#16

I am a student of ‘New Math’. It was different from the way my mother was taught (who, by the way, was a runner up in the Illinois state math contests). My daughter, who was taught math differently in the '90’s than I was in the '70’s and my mother was in the '40’s,now has a PhD in genetics (which requires a lot of math).

As far as I can tell, ‘traditional’ means ’ the way I was taught’. It does not mean good or better, it just means what I know.

BTW, this child also learned Spanish and Italian, and loves reading Greek and Roman classics. She also loves Pope John Paul II (pope most of her life) and Pope Francis.

She went to public schools all her life (except first grade). She first studied Italian, than pre-med (prepare to gasp) at U.C. Berkeley.

I do not know what you consider to be traditional math. I suspect it isn’t what my mother was taught. I don’t know your age, so I don’t know if you were taught the way I was taught (I am 60) or my daughter was taught (She is 35).

BTW, my math books had the answers to odd numbered questions, my daughter’s books didn’t. What a gyp.


#17

Yes, they make it so hard and convoluted that the kids feel dumb. Kids are not expected to solve the problem in the most efficient way but rather to go as slow as possible and in the most round about way. Quite ridiculous.


#18

Can you specifically tell me what you have against common core Math. Ive seen the common core Math in my sons school curriculum. The way it teaches kids to group numbers by 10 or break larger numbers down into smaller numbers is pretty much the way I do Math in my head.


#19

I don’t know about every kid, but I’ve watched several kids of different ages struggle with common core math and feeling dumb doing it, including my own child and some other kids I tutor at middle school.

The basics of math have to do with skills: can you solve problems? Do you know your facts? Do you know the rules and how to apply them? With common core they expect the kids to understand every minutia and be able to explain every detail before they solve the problem, which is quite unnecessary and contrary to the way we learn. Understanding doesn’t always have to precede knowledge: many things are acquired through practice and retention first and understanding comes at a later stage. Classical school of education knows this well; hence their three stages of learning: grammar/memory, understanding/logic, and rhetoric/creative expression. Common core forces kids to go into the second stage without first laying the foundation. I don’t like it!!!


#20

I don’t either. You gave a good explanation.


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