President Trump is expected to sign several executive orders restricting immigration on Wednesday at DHS


#1

President Trump is expected to sign several executive orders restricting immigration this week. More: reut.rs/2jWIdvm


#2

How terribly sad. :frowning:


#3

Let’s see what the executive orders actually say, before we cry :bighanky: or cheer :dancing:


#4

Trump’s orders were expected to involve restricting access to the United States for refugees and some visa holders from Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, said the aides and experts, who asked not to be identified.

It’s interesting that Saudi Arabia is not on the list and yet most of the people involved in the attack on 9/11 were from Saudi Arabia.


#5

Trump’s orders were expected to involve restricting access to the United States for refugees and some visa holders from Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, said the aides and experts, who asked not to be identified.

yahoo.com/news/exclusive-trump-expected-sign-executive-orders-immigration-230259644.html


#6

The list are failed states, states at war, and Iran (an enemy state). SA isn’t in that group.

But before assuming too much, let’s wait for the details of the executive orders on Thursday


#7

Seems really unchristian.


#8

Trump has said to close the door and not allow some people from some countries in until we figure out how to vet them. Then open the door again. Sounds practical to me, if not extremely Christian. The Pope would say keep the door open until you figure out how to vet people.


#9

So, contrary to many Trump apologists, it truly isn’t just illegal immigration Trump want to oppose. Maybe we should wait though and see what these order are.


#10

He’s not wasting any time keeping his campaign promises is he ?

This is good. I support this action 100%.


#11

Robert Costa (Washington Post):
“Inside the WH tonight, the talk is all about immigration/exec orders. It’s going to be a multi-day rollout by Trump, not just on Wednesday.” twitter.com/costareports/status/824048167478067207

“Trump will sign several immigration-related exec orders Wed through the end of the week, per White House official.”

“Several “angel moms” who have grown close to Trump are in town, I’m told, and likely will be at WH on Wed. Women w/ children killed by undocumented.”

“Executive orders on Wed expected to focus on southern border security, immigration enforcement & sanctuary cities, per WH official”


#12

I think Trump opposes illegal immigration, acts of terrorism, and drugs pouring across the Mexican border.

What else could this be about ?


#13

More from Costa:

“Later in wk, there’ll be orders related to restricting access to U.S. for refugees / others from specific countries. 1st reported by @Reuters


#14

To block entry from the designated countries, Trump is likely to instruct the U.S. State Department to stop issuing visas to people from those nations, according to sources familiar with the visa process. He could also instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to stop any current visa holders from those countries from entering the United States.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer said on Tuesday that the State and Homeland Security departments would work on the vetting process once Trump’s nominee to head the State Department, Rex Tillerson, is installed.

Other measures may include directing all agencies to finish work on a biometric identification system for non-citizens entering and exiting the United States and a crackdown on immigrants fraudulently receiving government benefits, according to the congressional aides and immigration experts.

reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-immigration-exclusive-idUSKBN1582XQ?il=0


#15

I wonder how many really know the process of vetting potential refugees and what it requires. Two weeks ago, I met with the director of refugee services for Catholic Family Center in my city. This is the only local agency charged with accepting and placing refugees. There’s no one more on the front lines than her – she works directly with these refugees for months at a time. And the vetting process currently in place, which she walked me through, is…extreme to say the least. Untold numbers of potential refugees can’t meet its requirements because, for example, medical exams are only good for a certain length of time and if it takes too long to complete the next step in the vetting process, the medical exam certification may have expired – at which point the potential refugee has to begin all over again. This happened twice to a Syrian refugee student of mine; it took her three years to get through the process. The director with whom I spoke said bluntly that she has no idea how the process could become more stringent. And after seeing it for myself, I’m inclined to agree. I worry that “figuring out how to vet them” is doublespeak for simply not wanting to admit them at all.


#16

Because, according to the article, he wants to limit legal immigration somehow, which is above and beyond all this other stuff that is illegal.


#17

The world has changed. Even Pope Francis is changing his thoughts to some degree regarding immigration.

cruxnow.com/commentary/2016/11/04/sweden-pope-francis-becomes-immigration-realist/


#18

Amen! :thumbsup: As one who dealt with illegal immigrants “on the street” I consider the marked increase in the crime rates, the out-of-control drug importation, the out-of-proportion percentages of illegal criminals in our prison system, the increase in infectious disease rates, the upsurge in violence against women, and the many other deleterious effects.

Does Mexico and her neighbors bear zero responsibility in this? Is the US morally bound to support the rest of the world?


#19

One of my son’s classmates runs an organization that tries to get Yazidis and Christians out of the war zones and ISIS controlled zones in Syria and Iraq. They risk their lives doing that. According to him, it is next to impossible to get Christians and Yazidis admitted to the U.S. as refugees.

As we know, however, it has not been difficult to get Muslim refugees admitted. Sometimes it has been a terrible mess because the government will “sponsor” their relocation by agencies, but only so long. As a result, there are “marooned” refugees right here in my area; people who can’t speak English, have no means of self-support, government resettlement money run out, nothing. So eager was the prior administration to import them that it didn’t pay due attention to what it would take to honestly get them resettled. Not surprisingly, most of them are Muslims, but more about the non-Muslims below. But in addition, there are, in this country, clusters of refugees among whom there are a significant number who have the attention of law enforcement due to terrorist ties in the home country or expressed jihadi sympathies.

Now to the non-Muslims who came in with one of the same “refugee dumps”. Some of one group are Swahili-speakers who can’t speak English. Some few can speak a bit of French. Catholic Charities of Southern Missouri was asked to take them over, along with the Muslims, to provide services. CCSMO has done that in the past, getting them jobs, English lessons and social services. But it can’t take these later groups on because there’s no funding, all funding having been exhausted by the prior service provider, and CCSMO doesn’t have enough money of its own to undertake that very, very long-term and expensive job.

The prior administration offered nothing even after it knew about the “dumping”. After all, what was it to them? They got those people here, and felt virtuous about doing it, I expect.

Now, the Trump administration (and the locality) has to deal with it the best they can.
But there’s no magic wand to this. It’s very, very difficult dealing with it.

Sometimes dealing with illegal immigrants from south of the border is a cakewalk compared to dealing with some of these refugees from profoundly alien cultures. At least the former speak Spanish and some speak at least a smattering of English. Yes, some of the bishops in this country put forth the resources and the effort for the easy-to-settle Hispanics. But where are they when it comes to helping our diocese out with the people who will take years of support?

And one has to ask whether the prior administration really did them any favors in taking them from places they knew and putting them in places where they can’t get a job and can’t pay the rent, and local resources aren’t sufficient to do anything with them.


#20

Your post seems predicated on this point and it doesn’t reflect the experiences of those I know at all. The student I mentioned, who went through a three year vetting, is Muslim. It was exceptionally difficult for her to be admitted to the US. This is but one example. I have other Muslim students who came from Sudan, and it took years from them to be admitted.


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