Pro-Choice coworker bringing up Roe v. Wade


#1

Hi there. Yesterday at work, one of my co-workers that I’m close with IMed me “Bad news” about the Justice stepping down. “That means Trump has a pick.” Okay.

“This could be the end of Roe v. Wade. :(” Uhhh…

I had no idea what to say. I’d rather not discuss religion or politics, but it was brought to me. I do mention that I’m Catholic and that I go to mass but have avoided hot topics.

This kid is also 22, fresh out of college, Polish ‘catholic’ but atheist, “like most young people” as he says. I’m also in a very anti-theist office - like the comment section of YouTube personified.

Is it an obligation to say something? Or rather, out of justice to God, should I say something even though I don’t wanna?

Or should I just keep doing my work and not say a thing, because well, I have a job to do.


#2

Absolutely not.

You are at work to answer the phone, roll cigars, sell neckties or whatever your boss is paying you to do. Getting into arguments over politics isn’t necessary.


#3

Yes, don’t say anything other than “I don’t wish to discuss politics and religion at work”.


#4

Roe vs wade will never be overturned. The state may have more flexibility in regulating abortions As they should.


#5

That’s what Roe v Wade is, the federal government making abortion a constitutional right that can’t be regulated.


#6

Yes, this…


#7

It’s possible to discuss the subject objectively. “I wonder who he’ll pick? Do you think it’ll be Amul Thapar? Or maybe David Straus?”

Or you can comment on the timing. “The Republicans have a 51-seat majority. Had Kennedy waited until next year, it would have given the Democrats a chance to regain the Senate majority in this November’s elections and block any Trump nominee.”


#8

There is no obligation to say anything. Ignore the text.


#9

Certainly not.

You are there to work, not campaign for political causes or to convert the young and ignorant. Do your job, and pray for those that are in need.

Let us pray that he is right, and there is a conservative shift in store!


#10

We had Republican majority for decades & nothing happened but with some small changes. I don’t know if they wanted to kill their bread & butter yet but anything is possible. Pampers or Huggies?


#11

I’m not sure that’s technically correct.
The Constitution says nothing about abortion (I know because I read it).
To change the Constitution, you need to amend it, change or add to the wording of it. And there is a process to do it, but it’s with Congress, and not the Courts.

But somebody else might be able to weigh in on this?


#12

Bingo. You have no obligation to get into this with anyone. And since you’re at work, it’s best not to discuss politics and religion at all.


#13

Just because the constitution is silent on a right doesn’t mean that those rights are nonexistent. That’s the line of thinking that went into the right to privacy. It’s nowhere in the constitution but it’s “read into” it


#14

If you don’t want to say anything, you have no obligation to. You could gently point out that you are someone who supports the pro-life movement and so you don’t consider Roe v Wade the victory others do.

A former classmate of mine posted a rant about how there was a large pro-life demonstration in her city and how appalled she was that so many of the demonstrators were young women. I suggested that instead of demonizing and judging these women, perhaps she could try dialoguing with them to learn their perspective. I doubt it’ll make a difference to that classmate’s perspective, but given that the conversation became four or five people ranting at me about how this was against a woman’s right to choose and me gently encouraging both sides to do nothing more than listen to one another without judgment, I’d like to think it would make a difference for anyone watching in the way they perceive the pro-life movement.


#15

I know, but people talk about “my Constitutional right to…”
Something can be a right that’s not written into the Constitution (like certain rights and responsibilities in Canon Law which is strictly religious and for Catholics).
I’m just wondering if one can rightly call it a “Constitutional right”.
In the case of abortion, I see people talk on the internet about how they have the Constitutional right to do this, but there has been no amendment.
At the same time, our laws are not only in the Constitution, but also from the courts and then there are state and local statues, too.

PS, I have the sinking feeling I’m not getting my point across very well :slightly_smiling_face:


#16

Someone said that to me yesterday, and I said “From your lips to God’s ears”

They looked at me with terror on their face, these people are beside themselves at the though of not being able to murder their children legally on demand.


#17

If you aren’t comfortable talking politics in the workplace then don’t.


#18

No, it isn’t.

Roe v Wade determined that the government cannot criminalize abortion or unreasonably interfere with access to an abortion. What it means to “unreasonably interfere” is fact-specific. That’s why the rules vary from state to state and why there are still lawsuits regarding abortion access.

There is no constitutional right to an abortion. The constitutional right is to be permitted to obtain an abortion without criminal penalty or unreasonable state interference.


#19

They are constitutional rights but not all rights are enumerated


#20

To really understand what is meant by “rights” in the context of US law, you have to really understand the concept of natural rights, and positive rights vs negative rights.

I have the right to healthcare. It would be immoral for anyone to stop me from seeking healthcare. I do not have the right to have my healthcare paid for by someone else.

A right to access healthcare is a negative right, it only requires that I shoulder the burden to access the healthcare.

Demanding someone else pays for it is trying to impose a positive right. Positive rights are rights granted by the State through their capacity to coerce people into an action. The right to a trial by jury is another example of a positive right.

The right to have healthcare paid for, or the right to a trial by jury are positive rights because those things can only exist when someone else is being coerced into performing an action on someone else’s behalf.


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