Problems im having recently


#1

been thinking sometimes I think the church has very high and unreasonable expectations. There is what 6 billion people on the earth with not even half being caltholic. The average person even the so called catholics are very ignorant of their faith most people probably don't even practice nfp and not using condoms. Not to mention the eucharist which gives life alot of people don't partake of it. How will God judge all these people? in such a secularized world


#2

[quote="wiggbuggie, post:1, topic:309479"]
been thinking sometimes I think the church has very high and unreasonable expectations. There is what 6 billion people on the earth with not even half being caltholic. The average person even the so called catholics are very ignorant of their faith most people probably don't even practice nfp and not using condoms. Not to mention the eucharist which gives life alot of people don't partake of it. How will God judge all these people? in such a secularized world

[/quote]

God will judge all with both mercy and justice....

As for the "High expectations" of the Church....they are no higher than that set by Jesus Himself....
"You must be perfect as your Heavenly Father is perfect"...Mt 5:48.

Peace
James


#3

God shows no partiality. There is something taught in the Church known as "invincible ignorance" - in short, that means there might be persons through no fault of their own, never embraced the Gospel. So while it is possible for someone who never to have received the Eucharist to be saved, the Church has all obligations to preach the one Gospel including the Eucharist. Ultimately, God knows the heart of each soul - if that soul is disposed to embrace the Gospel if he is fairly presented it, that could be an embrace of the Gospel in a certain exceptional way. In other words, they will not have "formally" embraced the Church, but they will have the suitable heart open to embracing the Church if evangelized.


#4

The fact that others do something does not take away truthfulness from a timeless truth. Remember the words of Christ on the "act of repudiation" allowed by the Law: "in the beginning it was not so ...] what God has united let no man separate.".

In short: each of us is called to educate ourselves as best as possible, to follow to the best of our heart's capacity the Lord's commandment ("love one another as I have loved you"), and to refrain from all works of iniquity even if the whole world were to accept them as the norm and to condemn us (and even persecute us!) for holding on to the tradition (1 Corinthians 16:13, 2 Thessalonians 2:15).

Perhaps you are unaware of the fact that the most largely persecuted religious group is Christianity, with over 100,000 martyrs murdered every year simply because of their faith, and that the largest and most largely persecuted Christian community is the Catholic Church. It's not easy to be a Christian, much less to be a Christian in Holy Church: we are called to "take up our cross", to follow Christ and, like Him, the living God, to be "despised and rejected" becoming "a man of sorrows, acquainted with suffering". And this is not a lot, surely not more than what the Son of God himself endured for us.


#5

[quote="wiggbuggie, post:1, topic:309479"]
been thinking sometimes I think the church has very high and unreasonable expectations. There is what 6 billion people on the earth with not even half being caltholic. The average person even the so called catholics are very ignorant of their faith most people probably don't even practice nfp and not using condoms. Not to mention the eucharist which gives life alot of people don't partake of it. How will God judge all these people? in such a secularized world

[/quote]

Those souls who die in unrepentant mortal sin are condemned to Hell and we faithful to Church teaching should hold all the injustice and sin which prevails with mankind rather as a call to action than a proof that the She is wrong. In the past the world up from the classical times was converted by a group of poor preachers with a meek and unlearned background despite terrible persecutions that lasted for centuries under Roman Emperors like Nero, Decius and Valerian. As St. Thomas Aquinas says, "this fact was either miracle or it was not. If it is miraculous, you have what you asked for, a visible fact; if it is not, then there could not be a greater miracle than that the whole world should have been converted without miracles." The Lord being on our side we should never be afraid for "with God all things are possible" (Matt. 19:26) and "if it be of God, you cannot overthrow it" (Acts. 5:39). Even if the ship is shaking and its stormy outside He has given the promise of His protection (Matt. 16:18) and will not leave us orphans as He continues to bless His Church with His Real Presence in the Tabernacles and Holy Masses over the globe. We should say with St. Paul that we can do all things in him who strengthens us (Phil. 4:13) about which the lives of countless Saints testify. While God created the world from nothing that is not the case with the Saints: If we wish to change the world then let us start from ourselves immediately and may God bless us.


#6

[quote="wiggbuggie, post:1, topic:309479"]
been thinking sometimes I think the church has very high and unreasonable expectations. There is what 6 billion people on the earth with not even half being caltholic. The average person even the so called catholics are very ignorant of their faith most people probably don't even practice nfp and not using condoms. Not to mention the eucharist which gives life alot of people don't partake of it. How will God judge all these people? in such a secularized world

[/quote]

It seems that not a lot of people will enter the eternal kingdom of God.

As far as having high standards, I am on the verge of despair sometimes. Jesus tells us to deny our very selves.

If that was possible, I'd like to think we'd all jump on it, for its ultimate heavenly reward. But, I find it difficult that we are made to have so many desires and inclinations that we are supposed to mortify, in order to be saved. I find it hard to internalize that command, to mortify one's very self. It seems like an "unfunded mandate" to tell us to do something and then not tell us how to do it.

I take the mendicant religious orders as a case in point. Oh, yeah, they take up the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, then they turn around and they're always begging for money. They want money not only for their apostolates but for themselves, as well. That's not poverty, to me.

Don't get me wrong. I want to go to heaven. I just have a hard time digesting and implementing all the things that I'm supposed to, to be saved. I agree. I'm having problems, too.


#7

Sirach,
It is indeed difficult to know how to "deny our very selves" when we are also told to "Love our neighbor as our selves".

I do not pretend to have the answers to this seeming paradox, but I do know that the key does lie in that word "Love"....Agape. I know this because we are told that God IS Love and that all the law and all of the prophets are founded on Love.

The quest we are on...to deny ourselves...must then have more to do proper discipline, that is, not so much denying our desires as subjugating them to a proper order of things. An order based on and directed by Godly Love.

Peace
James


#8

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