protestant attitudes


#1

I was talking to a protestant friend of mine about the difference between mortal and venial sins as defined in the catechism. And not that I was expecting her to embrace it, but there is some good insite into our interiors there and it was like she just rejected it from the word Catholic.

I was wondering if this is a common attitude of a lot of prots. toward anything Catholic.


#2

I don’t know think that the majority of Prot are anti Catholic but there are a lot of AC Prot. I’ve mentioned this on other threads, my ex pastor-a independent baptist-did not want us to see the Passion. His main reason was that Mel Gibson was Catholic and Catholics didn’t believe in the resurection.(FOr some reason I can not remember how to spell resurection :o )


#3

My observation has been that most mainstream protestants have a “live and let live” attitude. They don’t try to convert you and they don’t want you trying to convert them. It seems that the more splits there have been in a denomination’s past, the more they reject Catholicism.

If you consider a person who was brought up say, Baptist, and has never been exposed to any other religion, but has been exposed to numerous ministers holding and preaching various anti-Catholic beliefs, it is reasonable to assume that they would assume a defensive posture when exposed to anything Catholic and would attack it using what they have been taught of the Bible. I was once in a discussion with a very active and devout lady about the importance of obedience in addition to faith (I tried not to use the word “works”), and when she got frustrated with me, she snipped “You either believe the word of God or you don’t.” When I quoted a few other Biblical passages in defense of my position, she informed me that those passages did not mean what I was reading into them. Some arguments you just can’t win.

The “higher” denominations such as Methodists and Lutherans are usually more accepting of Catholics but obviously don’t accept all our beliefs and will argue endlessly about details.

Then, there are the denominations such as SDA and JW who are openly and vehemently anti-Catholic. I guess some Baptists, since each church is totally independent, also fall into this group.

All in all, I would hesitate to characterize all protestants the same way. They differ a lot, depending mostly on what they have been taught.


#4

[quote=deb1]I don’t know think that the majority of Prot are anti Catholic but there are a lot of AC Prot. I’ve mentioned this on other threads, my ex pastor-a independent baptist-did not want us to see the Passion. His main reason was that Mel Gibson was Catholic and Catholics didn’t believe in the resurection.(FOr some reason I can not remember how to spell resurection :o )
[/quote]

For one the Passion and the Ressurection are two differnt things…When the Ressurection of the Christ comes out, then that will be a movie about the Ressurection…

for another, there are alot of anti prot caths, because there are 1.1billion of us, and only about 200million of you…appoximately…

whostartedyourchurch.com


#5

[quote=deb1]I don’t know think that the majority of Prot are anti Catholic but there are a lot of AC Prot. I’ve mentioned this on other threads, my ex pastor-a independent baptist-did not want us to see the Passion. His main reason was that Mel Gibson was Catholic and Catholics didn’t believe in the resurection.(FOr some reason I can not remember how to spell resurection :o )
[/quote]

Strange, as the Resurrection (sp?) took place in that movie also. As for the original post, one of the main tenets of protestantism is rejection of the Catholic Church so it’s to be expected. They wouldn’t be protestants if they were ready and willing to accept Catholic doctrine.


#6

[quote=Genesis315]Strange, as the Resurrection (sp?) took place in that movie also. .
[/quote]

Believe it or not, my husband and I brought this up to our ex pastor. We must have been rebellious because we saw the movie anyway. But he seemed to disbelieve us. It was very sad because he was a good, kind man but his anti Catholic sentiments were so strong that he refused to give them up. The members of our church simply went along with him.


#7

[quote=Genesis315]Strange, as the Resurrection (sp?) took place in that movie also. As for the original post, one of the main tenets of protestantism is rejection of the Catholic Church so it’s to be expected. They wouldn’t be protestants if they were ready and willing to accept Catholic doctrine.
[/quote]

My husband and I must have been viewed as rebels in our old church because we viewed the movie despite the pastor’s warnings and tried to correct his views. The sad thing is that although he had known us three years, come to our house for many bible studies and dinners, he still refused to believe us when we assurred him that the movie does show Jesus raising from the dead. Morally, our pastor was a very good, kind hearted man, just sadly confused. On the plus side, the movie The Passion and my pastor’s attitude started me on my road to studying Catholicism. I am supposed to see a man this SUnday about taking RCIA classes.


#8

[quote=deb1]Believe it or not, my husband and I brought this up to our ex pastor. We must have been rebellious because we saw the movie anyway. But he seemed to disbelieve us. It was very sad because he was a good, kind man but his anti Catholic sentiments were so strong that he refused to give them up. The members of our church simply went along with him.
[/quote]

This is something I find strange with some protestants. They get all over us for believing in papal infallibility and authority, yet they give the same defference to their pastor.

I wonder where this idea that Catholics don’t believe in the Resurrection comes from? I guess maybe because we display crucifixes with Jesus still on the cross. Haha, do they just ignore the fact that Easter is one of, if not the holiest day of the year for us?


#9

Yep! I see it all the time…and I’m not the only one. Check out this thread: forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=36544


#10

[quote=deb1]I don’t know think that the majority of Prot are anti Catholic but there are a lot of AC Prot. I’ve mentioned this on other threads, my ex pastor-a independent baptist-did not want us to see the Passion. His main reason was that Mel Gibson was Catholic and Catholics didn’t believe in the resurection.(FOr some reason I can not remember how to spell resurection :o )
[/quote]

I don’t know about other churches, but I can speak from my experiences.

I have belonged to 3 protestant churches and visited dozens. None of them were anti-catholic. They really didn’t pay much attention to catholic churches and were more concerned about reaching the faithless. Although they disagree on doctrine, they respect catholics that are truly walking with the Lord (not the luke warm 3 mass/year so called Christians). I work with Love INC. (Love In the Name of Christ) and we work with all types of Christian churches. Protestant and Catholics work side by side to minister to people in need. There is no theological debating, just love of fellow man and our Savior Jesus Christ. It is truly a Christian organization.

There may be some pastors who are anti-catholic and discourage people from seeing “The Passion”, but I think they are in the minority and doing a disservice to their congregations. The film was a huge sucess and it wasn’t just catholics that made that happen. Our (non-demominational) church hugely ENCOURAGED people to see “The Passion”. In fact, they bought several entire theatre showings and gave out tickets so as many people could see it. Each showing was full to the max. On Easter Sunday, they provided a viewing of the film at the church. They offer discount or even “scholarship funded” DVDs to people interested who can’t afford it. I heard many stories like this from non-catholic churches.

The film is still a great movie and the director being catholic has no bearing on it. The focus is the passion of Jesus Christ and I think that comes accross very well despite the fact that it’s a hard movie to watch again.

Mel did a fine job showing what a sacrifice our Lord made for us.

.


#11

I too notice what you described.

What’s ironic is that I am a revert to Catholicism, and believe it or not, my path back to the Church was instigated by good old fashioned protestants.

I so admire evangelicals for their grasp of scripture, and the epistles such as Romans, Galatians, Timothy… The fire and brimstone doctrine is really important as an antidote to today’s lukewarm “everyone is good and nobody is bad,” which is simply not true.

I used to listen to Christian radio with good conservative protestant ideas, but I noticed the commentators seemed unable to resist taking jabs at Catholics. It troubled me for months. I resolved my discomfort by reading and studying the Church Fathers. I learned through the white hot light of reason what Cardinal Newman found: to study Church history is to abandon protestantism.

I absolutely love the Catholic Church and it is sad to me that so many protestants have been taught such hateful things about it.

Please come back, separated friends!

That’s my 2 cents.


#12

**>>They really didn’t pay much attention to catholic churches and

were more concerned about reaching the faithless. Although
they disagree on doctrine, they respect catholics that are truly
walking with the Lord**

That was my experience also when I was a christian. I am getting the feeling that the Catholics on this board have the wrong impression of Prots, and I think it has to do mostly with the born-agains. We really never talked about any differences between the churches. We often had combined services, too.
**

I so admire evangelicals for their grasp of scripture**
I hope you’re not using the words “protestant” and “evangelical” interchangeably! Please say you aren’t!


#13

I hope you’re not using the words “protestant” and “evangelical” interchangeably! Please say you aren’t!

Well, gee, Adso, maybe you ought to give us a reason why you don’t think the two terms are interchangeable. I think most of us recognize that “Protestant” refers to a wider set than “evangelical”. And that “evangelical” is a subset of “Protestant”, a term which in general usage is used to refer collectively to most non-Catholic Christians. Please don’t tell me that you don’t think evangelicals are Protestant. If that’s your point, then start a new thread on it.


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