Protestant Baptism of Holy Spirit vs. Confirmation


#1

In the Philippines, there have been a growing number of charismatic movements in the 90’s and once I’ve been a member of one catholic charismatic movement there. I’ve been thankful of this because somehow I have been made closer to God by reading Sacred Scriptures.

I also noticed that most, if not all, of them copied the Protestant version of “baptism of the Holy Spirit.” I know that in the Catholic Church we refer this to the Sacrament of Confirmation and can only be administered by a bishop or a priest in the absence of a bishop but delegating his authority to a priest.

Since most of these people performing are not priests but lay people, are they not willfully usurping the authority of a bishop? Or is this action not regarded as the same as that of Confirmation? What’s the difference and how does the Church regard this actions of the lay people performing such “baptism” as these charismatic movement calls it?

This question just came to mind with the recent feast that we celebrate the Pentecost. And also knowing that most of these catholic charismatic movements have been allowed by the the dioceses and some like Couples for Christ are allowed by the Vatican.

Pio


#2

I’m not sure what your particular experience was in the Catholic Charismatic movement, but I can tell you mine.

First, it is made very, very clear that we are not dealing with a sacrament of the Church, nor are we seeking to replace one. We also make clear that a Catholic has received, in a particular way, the Holy Spirit in both Baptism and Confirmation. What we seek in praying for the person in baptism of the Holy Spirit (and I’d add here that, because of potential confusion, the name doesn’t thrill me) is a re-awakening of the Holy Spirit within them, and in their lives, through an increased awareness of His presence, and an openness and surrender of self to Him.

There is nothing particularly “protestant” about that, I’d suggest. However, when a group chucks the sacraments overboard, prayer such as this is about all that is left, and it could get, and perhaps has gotten, billed as something more than it is or can be.

Blessings,

Gerry


#3

[quote=Gerry Hunter]…
First, it is made very, very clear that we are not dealing with a sacrament of the Church, nor are we seeking to replace one. We also make clear that a Catholic has received, in a particular way, the Holy Spirit in both Baptism and Confirmation. What we seek in praying for the person in baptism of the Holy Spirit (and I’d add here that, because of potential confusion, the name doesn’t thrill me) is a re-awakening of the Holy Spirit within them, and in their lives, through an increased awareness of His presence, and an openness and surrender of self to Him.
[/quote]

Great response! I will add this. If the Catholic Charismatic experience does not bring you closer to the Sacraments and especially the Holy Eucharist and Reconciliation, it is not genuine Catholic Charismatic. It is that simple.

Protestants do not have these Sacraments, so you are talking about two different things.

I would suggest, that in the Catholic Church, we are very clearly taught that it is best for the Unity the Holy Father is focusing on, we first look for the areas we agree on. We cannot ignore those that we have not come to terms with, but before we focus on them we should pray and do it with charity.

I am not lecturing and hope it does not come across that way but we are about to enter a new phase of ecumenism with this Holy Father so must be very prayerful in this area.


#4

Well, I’m totally in agreement that the Sacrament in order to be valid must have a valid intent and matter. In the case of the “baptism of Holy Spirit” by protestants and catholic charismatics, they should not however use the same terms and reference the same verses to that of the Confirmation. It will only add up to confusion and will further division. In the light of the Catholic teachings, I may regard it as just praying for the person to invoke the Holy Spirit’s action–but is never the same as Confirmation where we have an indelible mark and the Sacrament cannot be repeated again.

Pio


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