Protestant friends


#1

In conversation today my friend told me that her daughter was going to have her tubes tied after she has this next child, I remained silent, but our eyes met, and I had a grave look but didnt say anything, should I? Plus she didnt ask my opionion.


#2

The moment has passed, so I probably wouldn’t bring it up again just for the purpose of discussing the moral ramifications of sterilization. However, I guess if I were you I’d be prepared for “next time”-- whenever and whatever that may be-- if it seems appropriate to speak up. www.omsoul.com and www.hh76.com have great materials on contraception, abortion, and other moral issues of our time.

I tend to bring things up or make a comment only when I believe I can have an impact. Otherwise, I let them slide with my Protestant friends. For example, when my good friend (Baptist) makes a comment about someone getting saved, I don’t go into the theology of why that’s in error b/c I know that this will not change her beliefs and can damage our friendship.

There is no right or wrong answer to your question, it completely depends on the people involved and the situation.


#3

[quote=1ke]I tend to bring things up or make a comment only when I believe I can have an impact. Otherwise, I let them slide with my Protestant friends. For example, when my good , I don’t go into the theology of why that’s in error b/c I know that this will not change her beliefs and can damage our friendship.

[/quote]

My personal opinion: If a Baptist brings up any converstion regarding “getting saved”, you must speak your faith.

reasons- 1) If they even bother to mention this and they are aware of your Catholic faith then they have already crossed the line( not necessarily an negative ) and you should be open to give such response. 2) They may be wondering about the Catholic faith and want to hear it from you- a Catholic friend. 3) Just because you discuss your differences does not imply they you will lose your friendship. 4) The fact that it has been brought up give you a legit oportunity to discuss faith as written in 1 Peter 3:15-16 “Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect, keeping a clear conscience, so that those who speak maliciously against your good behavior in Christ may be ashamed of their slander.”

Recognize ,the second that "(Baptist)friend makes a comment about someone getting saved " to you, a Catholic, for all intent and purposes he/she HAS asked “you to give the reason for the hope that you have.” Therefore, you should respond appropriately with kindness and respect.


#4

[quote=Micael]My personal opinion: If a Baptist brings up any converstion regarding “getting saved”, you must speak your faith.
[/quote]

I disagree. Again, I said it depends on the person and the situation. The rest of your reply is full of inaccurate assumptions and I am not going to go into it.

Suffice it to say that I know my friend and you don’t. The OP knows her friend and we don’t.


#5

[quote=jillisamarie]In conversation today my friend told me that her daughter was going to have her tubes tied after she has this next child, I remained silent, but our eyes met, and I had a grave look but didnt say anything, should I? Plus she didnt ask my opionion.
[/quote]

It sounds as though the meeting of eyes said a lot. If your friend is Protestant she is not under the same direction as we. Sure, she is as much under God’s direction as we, but her denomination does not hold her to any contraception laws.

She knows you are Catholic and saw your look? You spoke volumes. She knows the Church’s view and even though she may agree, it is her daughter. She cannot tell her daughter what to do.

If she asks you about your views along the way tell her, but be very charitable. It’s hard. I have a Methodist friend who does not go to church and is ready to jump when it sounds to her like I actually do not think gays should do what they do. I have to hold my ground while sounding like I am not judgmental. Very difficult.

I wish you all the best!

Gloria


#6

Just a thought…in the second reading last Sunday, Paul says he “has become all things to all people”. Of course we are to proclaim the truth always, but the individual circumstances dictate in what manner we should do that. I don’t know that there are any definitive rules for how any one person should handle every specific situation, the important things to remember are not to turn our back on the truth, and to look for an opportunity to EFFECTIVELY share the Truth with others who are ignorant of it.


#7

[quote=1ke]The moment has passed, so I probably wouldn’t bring it up again just for the purpose of discussing the moral ramifications of sterilization. However, I guess if I were you I’d be prepared for “next time”-- whenever and whatever that may be-- if it seems appropriate to speak up. www.omsoul.com and www.hh76.com have great materials on contraception, abortion, and other moral issues of our time.

I tend to bring things up or make a comment only when I believe I can have an impact. Otherwise, I let them slide with my Protestant friends. For example, when my good friend (Baptist) makes a comment about someone getting saved, I don’t go into the theology of why that’s in error b/c I know that this will not change her beliefs and can damage our friendship.

There is no right or wrong answer to your question, it completely depends on the people involved and the situation.
[/quote]

I would think that beginning with . You know I’m Catholic and the Catholic Church teaches that doing that is a grave offense against God’s natural law… because…


#8

[quote=jillisamarie]In conversation today my friend told me that her daughter was going to have her tubes tied after she has this next child, I remained silent, but our eyes met, and I had a grave look but didnt say anything, should I? Plus she didnt ask my opionion.
[/quote]

A simple “Oh, I am sorry to hear that.” would be a way to stand up for your faith if you feel the needed to do so beyond the look. It appears that you got your point across without any words. Sometimes silence speaks more than tons of words.

But it really depends on how well the friend knows you and your views. As well as she could have been looking to you for some “ammo” to talk her daughter out of her current course of actions.

Personally, I would have said what I suggested. That way your position is out in the open and it opens the door for further conversation if your friend wishes or can be dropped without much discomfort by either party.

God Bless,
Maria


#9

[quote=MariaG]A simple “Oh, I am sorry to hear that.” would be a way to stand up for your faith if you feel the needed to do so beyond the look. It appears that you got your point across without any words. Sometimes silence speaks more than tons of words.

But it really depends on how well the friend knows you and your views. As well as she could have been looking to you for some “ammo” to talk her daughter out of her current course of actions.

Personally, I would have said what I suggested. That way your position is out in the open and it opens the door for further conversation if your friend wishes or can be dropped without much discomfort by either party.

God Bless,
Maria
[/quote]

(REPLY) Why would a woman announce to the world that her daughter is having her Fallopian Tubes tied or ligated? That is her daughter’s business. People are becomming very strange.
Perhaps her daughter is not capable of supporting any more children or for health reasons she wants her Fallopian Tubes tied.
This has been a huge issue in the Roman Catholic Church for ages. It is her body and this is not mulitation. I am a leader of song and when I look out over the congregation I know many “good catholics” who are not practicing birth control…THEY HAVE IT DOWN TO A SCIENCE!
John Weiss johnweisshome@aol.com


#10

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