Protestant Funeral


#1

Today I attended a beautiful, uplifting funeral at a Church of God of Prophecy.

During the service, the Minister spoke directly to the deceased lady’s daughter. He said that he believed the deceased was still “guiding” her (the daughter).

I am confused by this and would appreciate any help.


#2

I’m in RCIA, but I have attended quite a few different Christian (Protestant) denominations over the years.

I suppose that statement could be said of any Christian who has lived a good life and where characteristics of Christ were made evident in their life. Those who have died, who also lived their lives among us are an example. Those who were faithful to Christ and in whom the fruit of the Holy Spirit was made evident are good examples. Those who rejected Christ are bad examples.

In the funeral you attended, I suppose the pastor was promoting the good in the deceased and was saying that her life could be followed as a pattern. The daughter could be guided by the good example of her mother’s life.

If I am correct, I suppose such talk cannot be hard for Catholics to understand. After all, we can look at the lives of the Saints and we can benefit from them. Through the communion of saints, we have a wonderful exchange (see ccc#1475 and elsewhere).


#3

jmm08, Aplause for your post ( even if it was about funerals) . You did it with grace.


#4

Thanks for the thoughtful response.

[quote=jmm08]In the funeral you attended, I suppose the pastor was promoting the good in the deceased and was saying that her life could be followed as a pattern. The daughter could be guided by the good example of her mother’s life.
[/quote]

I must have misunderstood the intent of the Minister’s message, but it sure sounded to me like he was saying Mom still has an active role in her daughter’s life because the comment came right in the middle of comments that Mom is alive in heaven with Jesus and there is a celebration there, etc.

Thanks again.


#5

He said that he believed the deceased was still “guiding” her (the daughter). I am confused by this and would appreciate any help.

Being raised fundamentalist protestant I’ve never heard any minister say that our deceased loved ones were not actively praying for us in heaven. Far from it. I know this seems to fly in the face of protestants who argue against Catholics seeking the intercession of the saints. But, look at the chorus of this old time gospel song:

[size=4]A Vision Of Mother

Oft my thoughts drift back to childhood
To the time when I was free:
As I played before the fireside,
Round My darlin’ mother’s knee.

CHORUS
**There’s a blessed home up yonder, **
**Where my loved ones wait for me, **
**I saw Mother in a vision, **
Kneeling there to pray for me.

The one day our mother left us,
Daddy said she’d gone to rest,
I remember how she loved me
As she clutched me to her breast.

Some sweet day I’ll meet you Mother,
Your little boy is comin’ home
To see you as in days of childhood,
The one you loved and left alone. [/size]


#6

[quote=mark a]…During the service, the Minister spoke directly to the deceased lady’s daughter. He said that he believed the deceased was still “guiding” her (the daughter)…
[/quote]

This minister might need to reconsider his words. This sounds way too Catholic to be true. :rolleyes:


#7

I’ve not only heard such sentiments in Baptist churches, I’ve delivered them myself in one eulogy for a very dear friend and received great praise from several of the attendees, including the pastor who, from the pulpit, said that my eulogy basically made his sermon unnecessary.

There is a concept in Christianity known as aridity, usually used in reference to prayer. It refers to the apparent abandonment of the person by God. Of course, God has not abandoned the faithful one, but has merely stepped back to encourage the person to take a few steps closer to where God. God keeps doing this throughout our lives, and our ultimate destination is, assuming we stay the course, Heaven.

The idea of aridity in prayer also appies to the loss of loved ones. My friend Fred lived his life with humor, grace, and love, despite chronic illness, constant pain, and several personal tragedies. He has not abandoned me here on Earth. He has gone on to Heaven where he now waits for me, every day saying to me, “Come on, Mark. Just a few more steps. Don’t give up.”

– Mark L. Chance.


#8

[quote=Malachi4U]This minister might need to reconsider his words. This sounds way too Catholic to be true. :rolleyes:
[/quote]

Well, you might be interested to know there is a Crucifix at the entrance.


#9

[quote=mlchance]I’ve not only heard such sentiments in Baptist churches, I’ve delivered them myself in one eulogy for a very dear friend and received great praise from several of the attendees, including the pastor who, from the pulpit, said that my eulogy basically made his sermon unnecessary.

There is a concept in Christianity known as aridity, usually used in reference to prayer. It refers to the apparent abandonment of the person by God. Of course, God has not abandoned the faithful one, but has merely stepped back to encourage the person to take a few steps closer to where God. God keeps doing this throughout our lives, and our ultimate destination is, assuming we stay the course, Heaven.

The idea of aridity in prayer also appies to the loss of loved ones. My friend Fred lived his life with humor, grace, and love, despite chronic illness, constant pain, and several personal tragedies. He has not abandoned me here on Earth. He has gone on to Heaven where he now waits for me, every day saying to me, “Come on, Mark. Just a few more steps. Don’t give up.”

– Mark L. Chance.
[/quote]

Wow that’s really nice. I guess its part of the view of the communion of saints that catholics have. It sounds really catholic which is a good thing of course. I think protestants at the time of death really like the idea of the communion of saints and the departed are looking out for them wheteher they admit it or not.


#10

that’s the thing about protestants.

you never know what they’re gonna do next.


#11

[quote=Maccabees]Wow that’s really nice.
[/quote]

Thank you.

[quote=jeffreedy789]that’s the thing about protestants.

you never know what they’re gonna do next.
[/quote]

Whereas you can always count on all Catholics to always agree about everything.

Or at least count on some Catholics to take advantage of any opportunity, even grief, to get in a cheap shot or two.

– Mark L. Chance.


#12

[quote=mlchance]Or at least count on some Catholics to take advantage of any opportunity, even grief, to get in a cheap shot or two.

– Mark L. Chance.
[/quote]

Oh, but you are a Protestant, so that isn’t a cheap shot? :tsktsk:


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