Protestant martyrs


#1

It’s my understanding – and of course please correct me if I am wrong – that anyone martyred for the faith is a saint. What about Protestant martyrs, though? I remember a horrific story several years ago about a Protestant missionary burned alive along with his two young sons in India. Is he a saint? What about his two sons, the younger of whom I believe was eight?


#2

When a person is martyred the Church doesn’t automatically declare them as a Canonized Saint, they still go through the same process as anyone else who is Canonized. This does not mean that they didn’t go directly to Heaven though…they might well have.
As for protestant martyrs, they would go through the same process to be Canonized by the Church. There are Canonized Saints that were protestants at their death so there is no reason why the ones you are speaking of couldn’t be Canonized at some point.


#3

I’ve wondered about this myself. For example, the young lady who was shot at Columbine High School because she refused to deny Jesus.

Plus, I’ve always wanted to get the singer/poet/songwriter/musical genius/essayist/l and potential Catholic convert Rich Mullins canonized, but how does something like that even get started? (He was on the verge of converting when he died in a car accident.)

And what about GK Chesterton? Is there a formal cause for his Sainthood?


#4

Really?


#5

You can’t be canonized unless you are Catholic.


#6

I have wondered this as well.

Somewhere an ecumenical group of Catholics and Anglicans were martyred together. I often wonder if the Anglicans could rightly be called martyrs or not.

I assume yes, but I’m unaware of any other answer at the current time.


#7

You are going to have to provide proof for this.


#8

The example usually cited is Saint Charles Lwanga and Companions, the Martyrs of Uganda. As the Companions were canonized as a group, and as some of these were Anglican, it has been asserted that this means the Anglican martyrs were also canonized. Others dispute this. I am not aware of any authoritative clarification from the Church regarding whether only the Catholic martyrs were canonized and the Anglican martyrs excluded.


#9

The Church does not declare saints - only Saints. All the names of those who have died and been judged (by God) worthy of eternal life (saints) have not been revealed. The relatively select few who have been revealed(to the Church) as having been judged(by God) worthy of eternal life (Saints) is known to us.

What about Protestant martyrs, though?

They are probably in heaven, and as such would be, by definition, part of the Catholic Church and would be saints. But I cant say that with any certainty.
Is he a saint? What about his two sons, the younger of whom I believe was eight?
Probably saints, but definitely not Saints.


#10

<<As for protestant martyrs, they would go through the same process to be Canonized by the Church. There are Canonized Saints that were protestants at their death so there is no reason why the ones you are speaking of couldn’t be Canonized at some point.>>

Except theres one qualification all saints have in common–true and correct faith.


#11

Which all who enter Heaven will have/get…all who will enter will be made perfect before entering Heaven.

I might be able to come up with the saint(s) who were protestant, but there are more than 10,000 canonized saints…will take awhile to find them. On a Catholic radio program one of the presenters did name at least 1 if not more…I just can’t remember the name(s)


#12

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