Protestant "miracles"?


#1

As a new Catholic, I am curious as to how the Church views Protestant “miracles” (apparent evidence of God working in their lives, from the “mundane” [praying for a parking space and getting it, etc.] to the “awesome” [a stubborn world-loving family member coming to the “faith” after much prayer]). Are all of these to be seen as mass delusions? I am asking in order to better wistness to Prots in the future.

Thanks,
Guy


#2

[quote=Guy Daniels]As a new Catholic, I am curious as to how the Church views Protestant “miracles” (apparent evidence of God working in their lives, from the “mundane” [praying for a parking space and getting it, etc.] to the “awesome” [a stubborn world-loving family member coming to the “faith” after much prayer]). Are all of these to be seen as mass delusions? I am asking in order to better wistness to Prots in the future.

Thanks,
Guy
[/quote]

For heaven’s sakes, why should they be seen as delusions rather of the work of God? God and His grace are not confined to the Catholic Church nor to the sacraments. Our Pope would be the first to say this.

However, it is helpful to note that many people use the word “miracle” to simply denote a sense of God working in their lives, rather than, say, a suspension of the laws of nature. In this sense, life itself–the natural world, a baby’s birth, is considered a miracle.

Too many others, however (both Catholic and Protestant) seem to retain disturbing remnents of quietism in their faith and believe that God’s active involvement and perfect will alone are instrumental in the most mundane actions of their daily lives (i.e. God wants me to have this parking space right at this moment…") That’s just bad theology (it eradicates free will), and I"ve encountered this attitude in far more Catholics than Protestants.


#3

You could refer to the text below,

Mat 7:22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?

Mat 7:23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.

rgds
marlo


#4

God listens to and answers the prayers of all, even pagans. Remember St. Cornelius the centurion, the first gentile convert to Christianity.

Act 10

1At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was known as the Italian Regiment. 2He and all his family were devout and Godfearing; he gave generously to those in need and prayed to God regularly. 3One day at about three in the afternoon he had a vision. He distinctly saw an angel of God, who came to him and said, “Cornelius!”

4Cornelius stared at him in fear. “What is it, Lord?” he asked. The angel answered, “Your prayers and gifts to the poor have come up as a memorial offering before God. 5Now send men to Joppa to bring back a man named Simon who is called Peter.


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