Protestant monks


#1

You know SBC or pentecostal or non denom monks.

Why don’t we see those?


#2

Christians in general are not called to monasticism and early Christians were not monastics. Since most non-Catholic Christians adhere to following the Word of God, and we do not find the Apostolic call to monasticism, that is why you do not see such things as non-denom monks.


#3

It’s kidna hard to preach the gospel in a monastary. Protestants believe that it is important to preach the gospel to everyone. Also, historically it would have been difficult to setup a protestant monastary in the early days.

and Finally, Protestants are stong believers in Scripute Alone, and no where in the bible is there a monastary mentioned.


#4

The trinity is never mentioned in the bible either.


#5

Monasteries aren’t mentioned in the Bible, but the idea of a Christian going off by themselves to study for a few years is mentioned (e.g., Paul after his conversion).


#6

as a note, Anglicans do have monastic orders, revived in the 19th c. long after Henry VIII and his successors supressed and destroyed the monasteries and killed the monks. Since most protestant denominations do not value celibacy (irregardless of Christ’s own words on the topic) they do not provide for a formal way of living out that charism. Since many denominations also do not value a life devoted to contemplative prayer, meditation on scripture, and daily work as an alternative to more active apostolate in the world, such denominations naturally would not encourage associations of like minded people devoted to that lifestyle. the earliest monks arose from the desert tradition, which directly modeled Christ’s time in the desert, and frequent recourse to solitary prayer, which is entirely scriptural.


#7

There was not a “formal way of living out” that gift during the Apostolic era. If you were giufted to be a celibate, then you were to be a celibate. Simple as that.

One does not need to be a monastic to be celibate. Please.

Since many denominations also do not value a life devoted to contemplative prayer, meditation on scripture, and daily work as an alternative to more active apostolate in the world, such denominations naturally would not encourage associations of like minded people devoted to that lifestyle.

Again, same mistake.

One need not be a monastic at all to be devoted to prayer, to meditation on Scripture, and to daily work.

The Apostles managed just fine and they were not monastics. How did they ever get by without cloistering themselves away?

the earliest monks arose from the desert tradition, which directly modeled Christ’s time in the desert, and frequent recourse to solitary prayer, which is entirely scriptural.

Again, this all makes monasticism moot because anyone can take time away for solitary prayer and not be a monastic.

Just look at your own example, our Lord: not a monastic.


#8

Another mistake is that all monastics are cloistered. That would be news to Mother Teresa.


#9

I’m confused…are you saying that nobody is called to a monastic lifestyle, or that the Apostles weren’t? :confused:

Peace,
Dante


#10

monastic
adjective1. of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vows [syn: [URL=“http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/cloistered”]cloistered]
noun1. a male religious living in a cloister and devoting himself to contemplation and prayer and work [syn: [URL=“http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/monk”]monk]
You know the definitions look like the lives of the prophets, john the baptist Jesus before his public ministry, paul after his conversion and the rest of the apostales.

cloistered
adjective1. of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vows 2. providing privacy or seclusion; “the cloistered academic world of books”; “sat close together in the sequestered pergola”; “sitting under the reclusive calm of a shade tree”; “a secluded romantic spot”

And if you look at it were all called to cloister ourselves from the world.


#11

Mat 28:19 Therefore go and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the ***Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, ***

2Co 13:14 May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the ***Holy Spirit ***be with you all. Amen.

1Pe 1:2 according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, in sanctification of the Spirit, to obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ. May grace and peace be multiplied to you.

Enough for me!


#12

The monks have served a wonderful role in the history of Christianity. Can you think of any group of people more responsible for preserving God’s Word in the Bible?

Catholics and all other Christians owe a huge debt to the monastics that hand copied and preserved 1000’s of these bibles (often at extreme risk to their lives) throughout the centuries! What did it take, some 8 months, from daybreak to sundown, to hand-write the complete Bible.

Of course, it would have take only 7-1/2 months if it weren’t for those pesky Apochryphal Deuterocanonicals, eh? :wink:


#13

Not to mention the numerous hospitals that these monasteries opened to serve the poor throughout the world!


#14

This was an earlier response to monasteries not being mentioned in the bible.
Monasteries aren’t mentioned in the Bible, but the idea of a Christian going off by themselves to study for a few years is mentioned (e.g., Paul after his conversion).

Protestants seem to pick and choose on the “bible alone”


#15

I believe Martin Luther was a protestant monk. :wink:


#16

I can tell you don’t know much about monasteries. A fact of life in every monastery is the constant flow of visitors. Some are strongly religious, others less so, and others simply curious. They will all get a substantial dose of the gospel preached to them, in words but even more in actions and in lives being lived out for God. Never underestimate the witness that the lives of these men and women offer to the world.


#17

To me, the term “Protestant Monk” seems a contradiction in terms.

First, if one believes in Sola Fide, why live an ascetic life and take a vow of celibacy–by one’s own confession, doing these things do not affect one’s own salvation.

Also, anyone who is familiar with the strict lifestyle of most monks must find the notion of a “non-denomiational” monk hilarious. Non-denominational christianity is marked by religous indifferentism, something Catholic religious could possibly be–it would compromise their lifestyle, making it even more unnecessary than Sola Fide makes it.

In my opinion, only the Holy Roman Catholic Church and those very near it (EO) could produce people who live such holy lives.


#18

And I wonder why people call us Catholics arrogant…

To put it in a way I’m more comfortable with, only God can produce people who live such holy lives.


#19

Well formalized monasteries or priories may not be in the Bible however the religious lifestyle they lead is there. The Nazarite Order is an example of a structured form of asceticism.

Jeremiah lived an ascetic lifestyle, as did several other OT prophets. John the Baptist was a hermit, and Jesus was also ascetic. All the Apostles seem to have become ascetic at one level or another as they basically walked away from property and family.

From The Acts we see that the early Church as a whole quickly embraced an idea of common property and community. Which while not monastic in nature still points to the fact that the early Christianed put a value on those monastic concepts.

As to why Protestants (outside of the Anglicans) put little value into the monastic lifestyle. It would be multileveled. First as stated earlier the Protestant aversion to celebacy is a hinderance.as celebacy is an integral part of the acestic lifestyle. One cannot give their lives and time completely to spritual and ecclesiastical growth while in the married state. That isn’t a knock against the married but when one marries they take on other responsibilities (which are also God given).

Many Protestants also have a low view of monastasticsm. They often view it as shutting oneself off from the world. They really don’t understand all the various orders and how that they actually have active Christian lifestyles and functions. They also probably don’t consider that it was the monasteries that were primary in safekeeping the Sacred Scriptures. It is a style of spirituality that they are not familiar with so I think it is hard for them to comprehend its purpose.


#20

One might say that the Jerusalem community was the only one to form this “common property” practice. I had heard that since they had heard the words of Christ, they knew that Jerusalem’s days were numbered. So they sold all their assets and used the money to help maintain the new Church as well as assisting in evacuating when the Romans came. Some 30-40 thousand people were said to have escaped immediately prior to the sacking of Jerusalem in 70AD.

But none of the other communities in Acts were recorded as duplicating this “sharing of the wealth” so to speak.

To the rest of your post, I agree wholeheartedly.


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