Protestant Patrick?

:confused:A girl lives across the hall in my dorm and she is a protestant. She is also Irish. Today she wore orange saying that she was symbolizing the protastant part of her irish heritage…

did anyone ever here anything so dumb?:banghead: its ST PACTRICK’S day not Irish heritage day…

I’m sure it was a political statement, a Northern Irish political statement (William of Orange, the Orangemen, yada, yada, yada). A teacher in my school today said,“Green isn’t my color. ORANGE is!” Oh well, I’m sure my Scotch Irish ancestors are spinning in their graves that this son swam the Tiber.

[quote=Meggie]:confused:A girl lives across the hall in my dorm and she is a protestant. She is also Irish. Today she wore orange saying that she was symbolizing the protastant part of her irish heritage…

did anyone ever here anything so dumb?:banghead: its ST PACTRICK’S day not Irish heritage day…
[/quote]

It is a political statement, just as the wearing of green is.

Green is Catholic, orange is Protestant.

The color green really has nothing to do with St Patrick’s day, so the wearing of that color really means nothing.

[quote=ByzCath]It is a political statement, just as the wearing of green is.

Green is Catholic, orange is Protestant.

The color green really has nothing to do with St Patrick’s day, so the wearing of that color really means nothing.
[/quote]

Huh? St. Patrick is always pictured in green vestments…

Yea too bad shes probably english then lol . . .

The Sun will never set on the British Empire . . yea thats because God doesnt trust the English in the dark! :irish1:

[quote=Meggie]Huh? St. Patrick is always pictured in green vestments…
[/quote]

That has to do with the Green being associated with Catholics.

Can you tell me what time of the Liturgical Calendar when green vestments are worn? So did St Patrick only celebrate then?

Also I bet the vestments you have seen him in are not the vestments that were wron back when he was alive.

Well not even an 1/8th Irish, I can tell.

My Irish mother is rolling over.

Fogny

[quote=Meggie]Huh? St. Patrick is always pictured in green vestments…
[/quote]

Because green is traditionally associated with both the Free Republic and the ban that the English put on the showing of any public"green" symbols as they represent Irish rebellion against English rule.

There is a society of Orangemen and they are very anti-Catholic and naturally wish to retain rule by England.

[quote=JKirkLVNV]Oh well, I’m sure my Scotch Irish ancestors are spinning in their graves that this son swam the Tiber.
[/quote]

I can completely relate to this. My ancestors are highland Scots. Very Calvinist folk. I keep looking for some Catholics in my family tree, but so far I’ve turned nothing up. :smiley: There’s a first time for everything, I suppose.

There are also some protestants who claim Patrick was protestant. THe outrageous claims never stop. The man was commissioned by the Pope to convert the Irish people back to Orthodox Catholcism.
There were christians in Ireland prior to Patrick but they were small in number and not very Orthodox.

OF course most protestants in Ireland are not very deep in Irish ancestry they were put there by England to dilute the very irish catholic population to stop Ireland from uprising against England constantly this worked in Northern Ireland instead of uprising against England the Irish fought against themselves.
England actually paid protestants to relocate to Ireland.
Those with deep Celtic roots are almost always Irish Catholic.

since Patrick lived before the split with the orthodox or the reformation he could not really be called a protestant because in his time there were none!
He is a Christian Saint who should be honoured by all who follow Jesus

Yeah but he was a catholic christian. He took orders from the Pope was a catholic bishop for crying out loud.
Believed in the sacramental theology consistent with Catholcism and prayed to angels according to him he talked to them. Doesn’t sound protestant to me. To claim he was protestant is to be a liar unless protestants beleive in taking orders from the pope and believed in holy orders and apostolic succession. Patick was as Catholic as they come.

When I read the title to this thread I thought it was going to be a reference to the old Protestant myth that Patrick was not affiliated with the Roman church. It is based on a small amount of truth. Due to the nature of communication in the 5th century, St. Patrick ran his church as an independent entity. He wasn’t receiving weekly e-mails or faxes from the pope updating him on liturgical norms. In spite of this, St. Patrick was indeed a Roman Catholic. There is even a long held tradition that at some point in his career St. Patrick traveled to Rome and met with the Pope.

[quote=ByzCath]It is a political statement, just as the wearing of green is.

Green is Catholic, orange is Protestant.

The color green really has nothing to do with St Patrick’s day, so the wearing of that color really means nothing.
[/quote]

the wearin’ of the green has everthing to do with celebrating St Patricks day, and also everything to do with politics. During the centuries of British persecution begun by Henry VIII Irish Catholics were forbidden to practice their religion publicly, priests were persecuted and executed when found, and green became the color of parties who fought against British oppression. It was chosen because of the older tradition of associating green with St. Patrick, the patron of Ireland and the champion of Irish Catholics. Wearning green was declared a treasonous crime punishable by death or transportation, and was a political statement. Wearing the green today not only commemorates St Patrick, but the struggle of Irish Catholics against British and Protestant oppression.

Orange is the color of the militant protestant party in Northern Ireland, chosen for William of Orange, the Dutch protestant husband of Queen Mary, daughter of James Stuart who was barred from succession to the British throne because he was Catholic. Leading the Queen’s army, William decisively defeated the Catholic Irish rebels and instituted protestant rule over the entire country and effectively outlawed the Catholic faith.

[quote=atsheeran]When I read the title to this thread I thought it was going to be a reference to the old Protestant myth that Patrick was not affiliated with the Roman church. It is based on a small amount of truth. Due to the nature of communication in the 5th century, St. Patrick ran his church as an independent entity. He wasn’t receiving weekly e-mails or faxes from the pope updating him on liturgical norms. In spite of this, St. Patrick was indeed a Roman Catholic. There is even a long held tradition that at some point in his career St. Patrick traveled to Rome and met with the Pope.
[/quote]

Reminds me of the ‘story’ told by a well known TV preacher, (last year? year before?), who claimed ST. Patrick was Celtic Christian, and not affiliated with Rome. Don’t remember all of how it went, but was way off from any history of Patrick I ever read or heard. :rolleyes:

Kotton :thumbsup:

[quote=JKirkLVNV]I’m sure it was a political statement, a Northern Irish political statement (William of Orange, the Orangemen, yada, yada, yada). A teacher in my school today said,“Green isn’t my color. ORANGE is!” Oh well, I’m sure my Scotch Irish ancestors are spinning in their graves that this son swam the Tiber.
[/quote]

Take heart. The Irish Catholic ancestors of your transplanted Scottish Presbyterian ancestors are rejoicing as are mine.

I usually wear orange on St Patrick’s day, some of my ancestors were Scot-Irish from Ulster. Sometimes I’ll wear green and orange together, a stunning combination. :eek:

The whole colour issue is political. Sometimes it annoys Protestants to find out that Orangemen have been going over to the Pope, but it cannot be denied. Some day (God willing) we may see a that the Orange and the Green are together in God’s holy church.

[quote=Meggie]http://forum.catholic.com/images/smilies/confused.gifA girl lives across the hall in my dorm and she is a protestant. She is also Irish. Today she wore orange saying that she was symbolizing the protastant part of her irish heritage…

did anyone ever here anything so dumb?http://forum.catholic.com/images/smilies/ani/ani_banghead3.gif its ST PACTRICK’S day not Irish heritage day…
[/quote]

I don’t know all the facts, but I would caution that you cut her some slack. Irish Protestants greatly revere St. Patrick. The more enlightened Protestants give credit to the early Catholic evangelists for spreading the word of God and bringing pagans to Christianity.

It’s possible that she associates her faith with the color orange, as many Irish Protestants do. Since St. Patrick helped to convert Ireland to Christianity, perhaps she feels the best way to honor him, within her tradition, is to wear orange.

St. Patrick’s chosen color was actually blue, in honor of our Blessed Mother.

Now, if this girl goes around claiming that St. Patrick was Protestant, then you should perhaps enlighten her.

I did a google search using the words “St. Patrick Baptist” and found four pertinent hits. Apparently there are no internet apologists willing to argue that he was Presbyterian, but believe me, there are a few Irish across the pond who believe that he was!

God bless you all!

sigh It’s so sad, I love both green AND orange. Too bad orange isn’t a good Irish Catholic color, too. :tsktsk:

[quote=ByzCath]Can you tell me what time of the Liturgical Calendar when green vestments are worn? So did St Patrick only celebrate then?
[/quote]

Saint Patrick also had black vestments -something we know because the Tripartite Life tells of how he spent Lent in the year 439 on The Reek, fighting with the angel Victor and celebrating Mass, obviously in black for Lent. :wink:

Someone mentioned that blue was his favourite because of his love for Mary the Mother of God. Very unlikely in the 5th century when Mary was painted in more earthy and maternal colours, browns and ochres and reds - the colours you see in Greek and Russian icons. Blue as Mary’s colour comes into the Western Church much much later. Anybody know when the change to blue took place?


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us.
Holy Mother Brigid, pray for us.
Holy Father Colmcille, pray for us.

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