Protestant Penance


#1

I’ve heard many Protestants argue against penance, saying that Jesus’ sacrifice was enough and nothing else is required to absolve you if sin. But I’ve noticed that some Protestants will participate in what I’ll call a self-imposed penance. Example:

Joe Protestant is at his friend’s house and he really loses his temper and throws something through his friend’s window, breaking the glass, and stomps off. He goes home, cools off, and asks God to forgive him. Then he calls and apologizes to his friend and pays for the window to be fixed.

Isn’t that the same thing Catholic penance is? “Fixing the window” so to speak?


#2

You have the right idea.

Yes, if one commits a sin, 1st you go and confess the sin - you are forgiven, but. If it is possible to rectify the situation such as buy a window, give back stolen money etc.

Confession is just part of “getting rid of the sin”.

But in your story about Joe Protestant - he did not have his sin forgiven…he just did penance before a confession.

See 1st John 1: 9. It says you are forgiven if you confess.


#3

[quote=Curious]I’ve heard many Protestants argue against penance, saying that Jesus’ sacrifice was enough and nothing else is required to absolve you if sin. But I’ve noticed that some Protestants will participate in what I’ll call a self-imposed penance. Example:

Joe Protestant is at his friend’s house and he really loses his temper and throws something through his friend’s window, breaking the glass, and stomps off. He goes home, cools off, and asks God to forgive him. Then he calls and apologizes to his friend and pays for the window to be fixed.

Isn’t that the same thing Catholic penance is? “Fixing the window” so to speak?
[/quote]

Probably, why bother fixing or paying for anything if the Sacrifice of Jesus was enough.
Seems like he was atoning for his sins, by fixing the window.


#4

But in your story about Joe Protestant - he did not have his sin forgiven…he just did penance before a confession.

See 1st John 1: 9. It says you are forgiven if you confess

He did too. He asked God to forgive him and then called his friend and paid for the window. Remember, he’s a protestant. He’s not going to a priest. :wink:


#5

As a Protestant for 25 years, I did not hear enough on self examination and sin. But if one is interested in the subject, John Owen wrote a treatise on Sin and Temptation in the 17th century that, although hard to find, is one of the best treatments of the subject. “Penance” the word, is not used much, but true confession and repentance is when reading the Puritans. Your assessment of the reparation is accurate. Apologizing to God alone is only a part.

I actually long for the day when I can go to confession etc.


#6

I have found that protestants tend to deny Catholic teachings as wrong, but in substance, teach the same thing in some areas. For example, I remember a pastor who was great on faith alone, yet he was always talking about how we ought to want to be in church, we ought to want to volunteer, not a sin not to go to church but the truly faithful will be there. Real faith brings action were his words. But we are saved by faith alone.:rolleyes:

Your example is another one where they would never believe in penance, but actions show that they really do.

God Bless,
Maria


#7

ok…never mind that there are biblical references that are the basis for cofessing to a priest…Let’s look at it from a purely psychological standpoint if we may…

1.Talking out our problems and transgressions is good for us.
Who is the one person that we can talk to here on eath that we can feel “safe” that we will not be judged…our priest

  1. What we are really seeking is to repair our relationship with the Lord. That is the only thing that can relieve the burden that guilt of wrong doing places upon us.
    Who knows best how to help us “repair” our relationship with the Lord?.. our priest

  2. When we confess our sins we are seeking not only absolution but advice.
    Again, it is our priest that can tell us what we need to know not what we want to hear.

  3. Talking out our problems helps us to clarify our motives and seek solutions to changing that behavior.
    Our priest is trained to help us sort out these things and clarify them for us.

  4. According to psychological studies, the population with the lowest instance of suicide are Catholics that regularly go to confession or reconcilliation…
    Why is this you ask? Because no matter what we have done we can be forgiven if we are truly penitant and truly never want to repeat the behavior again. Also the same study found that Catholics in this category are able to talk about their most serious problems without fear of the other person rejecting or ostracizing them…i.e. without fear of abandonment

I am not super smart or anything, but when a psychological study comes up with results like this, as much as they would like to believe that they can cure anything, we have to pay attention.

Personally, I am thankful for reconcilliation. I have experienced the love and mercy of our Lord through my priest, and for that I am eternally BLEST!


#8

[quote=MariaG]I have found that protestants tend to deny Catholic teachings as wrong, but in substance, teach the same thing in some areas. For example, I remember a pastor who was great on faith alone, yet he was always talking about how we ought to want to be in church, we ought to want to volunteer, not a sin not to go to church but the truly faithful will be there. Real faith brings action were his words. But we are saved by faith alone.:rolleyes:

Your example is another one where they would never believe in penance, but actions show that they really do.

God Bless,
Maria
[/quote]

hehe ive heard protestant ministers do the same thing. I think some protestants are afraid of being “to Catholic” if they admit they have a similiar teaching.


#9

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