Protestant to Catholic Converts? Come Here!!


#1

Certainly many of you on this forum were at one time protestant and became Catholic. I was just wondering what your story is. What/who was it that brought you (back) to the church?


#2

Long story, brought up presbyterian, returned to church High Church Anglo Catholic Anglican, recieved into full communion with Church 5 years ago.

Why Catholic? (short answer)

  1. Eucharist - real presence.

  2. Bishop of Rome - Yes, there is a petrine ministry, no it’s not perfect and there have been some poor popes down the years but that doesn’t invalidate the office.

  3. VatII - Acceptance of Orthodox and Protestants as fellow Christians. Dubious interpretation of no salvation outside the Church (meaning the visible Roman Catholic Church) consigned to the dustbin of history.

Wouldn’t be anywhere else (well might be eastern rite Catholic if things were different but that’s another story…)


#3

My story is also long. About 25 years worth.

Let’s just say, I have always been in love with Catholicism and when my children were born, God spoke to me thru his many signs and wonders, and showed me the way to the Church.


#4

I converted three years ago. I was a schismatic in Eastern “Orthodox” Church (or Kerularian Church). I tried to be a good christian in the schismatic Church, but I never felt the presence of Jesus there, I prayed Psalms every day with the hope that Jesus will show me the true. When I finished it was an usual day. But after three days I don’t know ehat I felt and I enterd into the roman-catholic church in my city. There was the Mass in german (I live in Romania, Transylvania region, and the mass is celebrated three times: german, hungarian and romanian) and I had a feeling of peace, something warm and delicate overwhelmed my soul, I looked carefuly and I prayed. After that I went in the Conffesion Chair to ask the priest how can I talk with him and he told me that I have to go to the office to talk with the parish priest.
I prayed three days and I went there, at the office, I talked with the priest, he is the best priest I saw and of course I asked him if I can be a catholic because my soul feels that this is the true Church of Jesus Christ. After an year of cathehesis I made the profesion of faith and I became catholic. It was wonderful when I made the profession of catholic faith and the most wonderful was the Holy Communion.
I was so happy and now I am very happy!!!

The others schismatic Churches don’t know what they lose in their schism.
I have read recently a book about the conversion to Holy Catholic Church of two orthodox monks (monk in “Orthodox” Schismatic Church), one of them wrote the book and he had no enough words to describe how happy was he when he celebrated the Mass as a catholic priest, just like me (I’m not a priest, but I receive the Holy Communion every week or event three times in a week).

In he future I want to be a priest, a good priest and to serve Jesus Christ and the people all my life.

God bless you all!


#5

Hi, thanks for asking. It’s a long, long story.

After over 40 years of evangelical Protestantism, I was kicked out of my Protestant church for disagreeing with the pastors regarding some procedures and scedules (not doctrine). It was horrible–I lost my entire life. Somewhere on this board is a thread about it, and I am in the process of writing it into a book, but doubt it will ever get published. No sex.

Anyway, now I rejoice, because I never would have given the Catholic Church a serious thought if I had not been kicked out of my church. I believe that God had to allow this to happen to get me into His Church, the Catholic Church.

I love the Eucharist, the Authority structure, and just the fact that this is the Church that Jesus established. I love the rich, rich devotional heritage, all the saints and communion with them.


#6

[quote=theodorro]I converted three years ago. I was a schismatic in Eastern “Orthodox” Church (or Kerularian Church). I tried to be a good christian in the schismatic Church, but I never felt the presence of Jesus there, I prayed Psalms every day with the hope that Jesus will show me the true. When I finished it was an usual day. But after three days I don’t know ehat I felt and I enterd into the roman-catholic church in my city. There was the Mass in german (I live in Romania, Transylvania region, and the mass is celebrated three times: german, hungarian and romanian) and I had a feeling of peace, something warm and delicate overwhelmed my soul, I looked carefuly and I prayed. After that I went in the Conffesion Chair to ask the priest how can I talk with him and he told me that I have to go to the office to talk with the parish priest.
I prayed three days and I went there, at the office, I talked with the priest, he is the best priest I saw and of course I asked him if I can be a catholic because my soul feels that this is the true Church of Jesus Christ. After an year of cathehesis I made the profesion of faith and I became catholic. It was wonderful when I made the profession of catholic faith and the most wonderful was the Holy Communion.
I was so happy and now I am very happy!!!

The others schismatic Churches don’t know what they lose in their schism.
I have read recently a book about the conversion to Holy Catholic Church of two orthodox monks (monk in “Orthodox” Schismatic Church), one of them wrote the book and he had no enough words to describe how happy was he when he celebrated the Mass as a catholic priest, just like me (I’m not a priest, but I receive the Holy Communion every week or event three times in a week).

In he future I want to be a priest, a good priest and to serve Jesus Christ and the people all my life.

God bless you all!
[/quote]

Can you give the title of that book by the Orthodox monk and the name of the author. It sounds like something I would like to read.


#7

Author: Teodosie Bonteanu

Title: The Conffesion of a Converted one


#8

[quote=theodorro]Author: Teodosie Bonteanu

Title: The Conffesion of a Converted one
[/quote]

Thanks


#9

Anybody else wish to tell their story?


#10

[quote=JGC]3. VatII - Acceptance of Orthodox and Protestants as fellow Christians. Dubious interpretation of no salvation outside the Church (meaning the visible Roman Catholic Church) consigned to the dustbin of history.
[/quote]

Actually, it is still and always will be the official teaching of the Catholic Church that formal membership in the visible Church, that is the Church made up of the bishops (all over the world) and their flocks in formal communion with the Bishop of Rome, is normatively necessary for salvation. Salvation (in the middle or eternal senses) that occurs outside the visible, institutional Church is entirely possible but is considered extra-ordinary, and the Church can officially speculate, theologically and philosophically, on such matters only to a limited degree (e.g. a person could never be canonized who did not die as a formal member of the Church, or during the process of becoming one).

That is not to say that it is rare or difficult to see the Holy Spirit acting outside of the Catholic Church – I see this all the time in the inter-denominational and ecumenical events and groups in which I participate; and in the daily lives of my non-Catholic Christian friends. After all, Jesus won’t turn anyone down who calls on Him by name!

But the ordinary and normative context for salvation in and through Jesus Christ is within the visible, institutional Catholic Church. Check out the Church’s recent official teaching on this matter:

Dominus Iesus

In the Hearts of Jesus and Mary.


#11

My conversion story isn’t something that is clearly set out. I, too, grew up protestant. But by the time I got to high school, I was throughly miserable. I felt that something was missing, but I didn’t know what. I church hopped for awhile, and still couldn’t find what I was looking for. I wouldn’t have been able to tell you, at that time, exactly what it was that was the problem.

One of my problems was the lack of charity. I often found myself thinking, “How can I believe that God loves me when His people so obviously don’t?” Yes, I believed that there was a God. But it was more of a intellectual assent more than anything else. I didn’t see what He had to do with my everyday life.

A few months after a very nasty divorce, I had a kernal dropped in my path. I can’t remember exactly what it was now. But it caused me to sit up and think. But it still took years. I was very thick skulled. But in 1995 I started seriously looking at the catholic church. I found the “fullness of truth” there. And I knew that that was what I was looking for. But I still had reservations. Especially about Mary. But I found a priest who was willing to take all the time necessary to answer my questions and explain things to me.

In August of 1996, I finally started going to a church. The first sunday I went, there was an announcement in the bulletin about the RCIA starting up. I quickly signed up. Well, the rest is pretty much obvious. I’ve had problems over the years since then. But never any regrets.


#12

[quote=whosebob]Actually, it is still and always will be the official teaching of the Catholic Church that formal membership in the visible Church, that is the Church made up of the bishops (all over the world) and their flocks in formal communion with the Bishop of Rome, is normatively necessary for salvation. Salvation (in the middle or eternal senses) that occurs outside the visible, institutional Church is entirely possible but is considered extra-ordinary, and the Church can officially speculate, theologically and philosophically, on such matters only to a limited degree (e.g. a person could never be canonized who did not die as a formal member of the Church, or during the process of becoming one).

That is not to say that it is rare or difficult to see the Holy Spirit acting outside of the Catholic Church – I see this all the time in the inter-denominational and ecumenical events and groups in which I participate; and in the daily lives of my non-Catholic Christian friends. After all, Jesus won’t turn anyone down who calls on Him by name!

But the ordinary and normative context for salvation in and through Jesus Christ is within the visible, institutional Catholic Church. Check out the Church’s recent official teaching on this matter:

Dominus Iesus

In the Hearts of Jesus and Mary.
[/quote]

We have no disagreement here, the point I made was that we have moved from unless you are a Catholic you are outside the Church and cannot be saved to acknowledging other Christians partial communion with us and hence right to be called Christians (CCC 838)

And indeed (CCC847) specifically refutes this. This affirmation (outside the church there is no salvation) is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church.

Those ignorant of the gospel entirely are covered in (CCC848.)

Regretably we still have Catholics (some on these boards) trying to use Florence and Unam Sanctam to damn anyone outside the visible Catholic Church without exception.

So the ideal way to Christ is through his Catholic Church. What the Church acknowledges that those who do not know his Church or have an imperfect knowledge of it can be saved. And now, and since Christ, that’s probably the majority of people.


#13

Great posts, great witness. I would like to expand the question if I may, Were you first captivated by a book, an article, a TV show, a preacher, or by the actions and witness of a person? If I wanted to bring someone to the place you stand now, should I tell them they will burn in hell if they don’t adopt my religion, or should I listen to their story, be welcoming, live my belief in what Christ commanded and share my faith with them?


#14

[quote=Cat]Hi, thanks for asking. It’s a long, long story.

After over 40 years of evangelical Protestantism, I was kicked out of my Protestant church for disagreeing with the pastors regarding some procedures and scedules (not doctrine). It was horrible–I lost my entire life. Somewhere on this board is a thread about it, and I am in the process of writing it into a book, but doubt it will ever get published. No sex.

Anyway, now I rejoice, because I never would have given the Catholic Church a serious thought if I had not been kicked out of my church. I believe that God had to allow this to happen to get me into His Church, the Catholic Church.

I love the Eucharist, the Authority structure, and just the fact that this is the Church that Jesus established. I love the rich, rich devotional heritage, all the saints and communion with them.
[/quote]

Dear Cat:

I say don’t give a further thought to this occurrance. You are completely in the right Church now. PTL! But it’s too bad it had to happen. But maybe for a reason!


#15

Hello! My name is Jeff, and I’m new here. I just converted (2 months ago I was confirmed!! Yay!!).

I grew up an ‘episcopal’ but I really didn’t have much christian identity.

A couple years ago my religion professor depressed me by telling me what I later found out to be lies about Jesus, God, etc… I was really in a state of darkness, but I kept praying that God would help me through and show me the truth (even though I was intellectually agnostic).

God saved me and led me to be an avid student of modern biblical scholarship and philosophy, where I learned that it is irrational to doubt God’s existence and the events of the Gospels. I became a Christian at that time in a way. My head was converted, and my will was getting there, but my heart was still lagging behind.

I became a charismatic ‘methodist’ of sorts for a couple years, but I still denied that the scriptures were inerrant because of a lack of sufficient support from historical investigation (which was my only guide at this time).

Finally, 9 months ago God brought me to hang out with a Catholic friend of mine. Two years prior to this, I was vehemently anti-catholic. But over those two years I began to see that it was only what I thought catholics were that I didn’t approve of, and not what they actually were. At this point in time (9 months ago) I was just under the impression that Catholics were a bit unusual, but not horrible. I thought, “Well, that’s what they like–fine. I just don’t go for that.” Nonetheless, I would ask questions about, why Catholics do this or that, or what this and that means. I honestly wanted to know, not to prove them wrong (this friend was obviously passionate about serving the Lord), but just to know. Thank the Lord, I was given faith in His Church so quickly! After understanding Catholocism, God gave me a passionate love for the Church. Now I know that it is his One Holy Catholic and Apostolic authority on this earth that I can safely rest in. At this point, my heart and will were converted and my conversion to Christianity was completed in confirmation. (Of course, I know we are supposed to live a life of conversion, but you know what I mean…)

The reason I came into the Church was that God called me in. Another reason I thought of at this time for becoming Catholic was that Jesus+Living Authority throughout ages makes perfect sense; Jesus w/o Living Authority throughout ages makes no sense.

Thanks for asking!

Jeff

BTW I now accept the Scriptures as inerrant in virtue of the the Church’s authority.


#16

Hey all you “Catholic Converts” Let’s talk----have you had some trouble “witnessing” to friends and family??? What is the secret? So many just don’t even listen!!! They have their misconceptions about the RCC and that’s that. My own father told me just yesterday --“don’t I know Catholics worship Mary?”…how can I be in a faith that does this? Should we stop all together even talking about the faith with such folks? What we have all come to learn? What God has showed us? How HE has had his hand on our shoulder for a long time? How HE has lead us to THE TRUE CHURCH OF CHRIST??? Should we not even bother? Even on the net, there are so many so caught up in the total Fundamentalist agenda. I sometimes think we’re all wasting our breath. How do we really discern those we should waste our time even talking to, and those we shouldn’t.???

I know for a fact some Fundamentalists will never change their views. So why do so many of us even bother? While there are those who are really seeking the truth?

Converts–yes–this thread is for us. I’m so thankful for it.

I’m sooooooo discouraged right now.


#17

Perhaps people would like to tell how they came to believe that Jesus is fully present in the Eucharist.

Greg


#18

My conversion requires a bit of back story, so bear with me. There is a point to it.

I was raised Southern Baptist. I was “saved” at the age of six. (Looking back I cringe at the idea of viewing salvation as a one time event.) I was baptized at that time. I was a leader in my youth group and president of Youth for Christ in my high school. After my senior year, I surrendered my life to ministry of some sort. I wasn’t sure what, but I knew I was called for something.

Over the next few years I drifted away for God. I still attended church, but I was not into it like I was when I was younger. Finally, at the age of 25. I completely left church. I truly did not believe in God. I could easily base my decision on logic, and I could find no logic behind the existence of God.

Being Southern Baptist, I never drank alcohol. At the age of 27 I began drinking. Just over five years later I was drinking very alcoholically. In February of 2003 I woke up in bed one morning with my head split open and blood on my hands and shirt. My car was sitting in the flower bed of my apartments. It was totaled. That scared me so badly that I quit drinking for three weeks.

On Good Friday of 2003 I started my last binge. It ended Easter Sunday. The following Wednesday, I checked myself into rehab. The program I went through was based on AA’s 12 steps. The whole program is about God. The last step is about taking the message to others. Ministry if you will. My first day there, when I read the steps, I felt like Jonah. I had run from what God called me to do, and I spent my three days in the belly of a great fish. When I was spit out I decided I should look at the whole ministry thing again.

After being out of for a few months, I really felt two callings. I felt called to be a missionary or a priest. I was Baptist so I decided that maybe God just wanted me to look at Catholicism. I deciced to contact a parish down the street from my apartment. I sent an email, and about two weeks later I met with a priest. Here’s what really made me realize God had a hand in all of this. Of all the priests in Houston, Texas, the one I happened to contact was the diocean vocational director for 12 years. I decided to go to mass the next day. Since I have I shaved head and goatee, I wondered if I would have to grow hair and shave. The priest that walked in to do the mass was a young guy with a shaved head and goatee.

At this point, I figured God really wanted me to look seriously at the Church, which I did. It didn’t take long to figure out that the Catholic Church is the church of the apostles. When I was reading about the various doctrines all the holes I had always found in Baptist teachings were filled in. I officially came into the church over Memorial Day weekend. My job transferred to Northern Oklahoma in January. I’m using this time away from all friends and family to discern if the priesthood is really my call. I feel about 99% sure it is. God sent Paul into Arabia for three years after his call, so I feel like I’m in good company.

That’s a long explaination, but that’s how I got here.


#19

[quote=Greg_McPherran]Perhaps people would like to tell how they came to believe that Jesus is fully present in the Eucharist.

Greg
[/quote]

That was one of the easiest things for me to accept. As a Baptist, I had frequently asked where the Bible ever said it was supposed to by symbolic, and amazingly enough, no one could ever answer. When I heard the Catholic teaching, it fit perfectly in with the Bible.


#20

Well, don’t know if I should post here as I’m only in RCIA right now, so am only a convert in my heart, but have to wait till Easter Vigil to really join. :smiley:

Well, I was raised Southern Baptist, but when I was in college I grew discouraged with the Baptists. (Went to Baylor Univ - largest Baptist college in the world, & unknown to alot, has a large Catholic student body) In fact most of my life I have had friends who were Catholic. Most of my best friends were Catholic ( and one or two Orthodox). I was always attracted to Catholicism, but never went further than that. Somehow, I knew that there was something special about the “first” Church.
Then I was researching some family history, and decided to read the Catechism (in 1996) that had just come out in print. It really answered the questions I had, but never ventured to ask. Not to mention to clear up some misconceptions that as a Baptist I had. Still, I didn’t convert. (Too many distractions, but thankfully God is very patient with his children)
After attending an Orthodox Easter service, I was filled with a longing for the Church that Christ founded and knew that that was where I belonged. So even though I knew I was attracted to the Catholic Church, I wanted to make sure I joined the “real” Church. So I read and read about both (Catholic and Orthodox) . A few things happened for the next few years that were a “wake up call” so to speak and I felt lead to finally take that first big step. The distractions were gone and all I had to do was to “come home.”. So, here we are. Coming home to the Church that Christ founded. It’s been 30 years in the making. :smiley: (Sorry for the length!)


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